Pakistani kid 'kicks' his way to a world record

Published: July 7, 2017
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RECORD MAKER: A whopping 5,620 kicks in sixty minutes may seem impossible — and then some — for most, but Musa says he barely broke a sweat. PHOTO COURTESY: AHMED AMIN BODLA

RECORD MAKER: A whopping 5,620 kicks in sixty minutes may seem impossible — and then some — for most, but Musa says he barely broke a sweat. PHOTO COURTESY: AHMED AMIN BODLA

KARACHI  : Guinness world record holder Ahmad Amin Bodla feels sky is the limit for his pupil Muhammad Musa after the gifted 11-year-old’s record for most full-contact kicks in an hour was approved by the Record Holders Republic (RHR), UK.

The fifth-grader set the new record with 5,620 strikes from his alternative foot — a testament of his incredible stamina, which his mentor says could take him a long way in their sport.

“For Musa to achieve this feat at such a young age is truly unique,” Bodla, who himself holds several Guinness world records, told The Express Tribune. “The RHR have already acknowledged and inducted his record, and Assist World Records is next on our list. Had it not been for Guinness World Records’ rule that prevents U16 children from attempting endurance records we would’ve gone for it too.”

A whopping 5,620 kicks in sixty minutes may seem impossible — and then some — for most, but Musa says he barely broke a sweat.

“It was easy,” said Musa, “I love martial arts and Bodla really worked hard with me. I was determined to do this, and it got easy after a while. I didn’t feel too tired, but it’s probably because I worked hard before attempting it, like doing the drills diligently and following a proper diet plan.”

In addition to his voluminous kicking prowess, Bodla says Musa can hold his own in planking competitions too, often outlasting his seniors.

“Musa competed at the endurance championships in Lahore a few weeks ago and managed to take on and outdo senior black belts,” added Bodla.

But it wasn’t always like that. In fact, three years ago Musa was just one of many students at Bodla’s martial arts academy in Lahore. Through his hard work and dedication, however, he went from being just another student in his class to in a class of his own.

“Musa came to me when he was just eight years old,” recalled the mentor. “At that time I thought he was an average talent but his dedication to this thing we do grew on me. He would come to my home on a bicycle for training.”

Bodla also credited Musa’s father for his rapid athletic progress. “He’s got a very supportive father as well, who encourages him to take martial arts just as seriously as his academic education. That makes a difference, really.”

 

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