I had by no means 'forgotten' our beloved national anthem: Shafqat Amanat Ali

Twitter slams Pakistani singer for not knowing lyrics of the national anthem


News Desk March 20, 2016
Shafqat Amanat Ali (L) sings the Pakistan national anthem as Indian Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan (C) and Chief Minister of West Bengal Mamata Banerjee (C) look on ahead of the start of the World T20 cricket tournament match between India and Pakistan at The Eden Gardens Cricket Stadium in Kolkata on March 19, 2016. PHOTO: AFP

As Pakistan and India came face to face in Kolkata for a heavyweight World T20 clash on Saturday, seasoned Pakistani singer Shafqat Amanat Ali seemingly failed to seize the opportunity to make the nation proud with his otherwise immaculate singing skills.

Shafqat and Bollywood superstar Amitabh Bachchan were present in Eden Gardens alongside the two teams to sing their respective national anthems before the historic event. However, the Pakistani singer could not keep up with the lyrics of the national anthem which caused displeasure among many fans across the country.

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The singer has since apologised for his performance, saying that he was deeply hurt by the little faith that Pakistanis showed in him.

"I admit that there were a few audio and technical glitches that may have sounded like lyrical errors and I will surely apologise for not being able to win your praises this time, but assure you I had by no means "forgotten" our beloved 'Qaumi Tarana," he tweeted.



Many took to Twitter to express disappointment over the singer’s performance.











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https://twitter.com/naveed575/status/711433029080760320

Some even suggested that Shafqat should have been ‘coached’ properly before singing on the ‘big stage’.



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While others said Bachchan is a better singer than Shafqat as the former ‘sounds more in tune’.





COMMENTS (22)

Trollslayer | 5 years ago | Reply @S I'm an Afghan and I speak Farsi/Dari fluently, and I also know that Urdu has loan words borrowed from Farsi, however spoken Farsi/Dari is not understood by Pakistanis. I have Pakistani friends who are able to pick out familiar words from Farsi speech without understanding the context and content of the speech. Urdu's syntax and conjugation is derived from Hindi with loan words from Farsi and Arabic, which makes Urdu and Farsi mutually unintelligible to its respective speakers.
Trollslayer | 5 years ago | Reply @S I'm an Afghan and I speak Farsi/Dari fluently and I also know that Urdu has loan words borrowed from Farsi, however spoken Farsi/Dari is not understood by Pakistanis. I have Pakistani friends who are able to pick out familiar words from Farsi speech without understanding the context and content of the speech. Urdu's syntax and conjugation is derived from Hindi with loan words from Farsi and Arabic, which makes Urdu unintelligible to the Farsi speaker and vice versa.
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