Witness fails to identify ‘target killer’ in court

The suspect had confessed to killing ASI Shahbaz in 2005 near Yusuf Plaza.


Our Correspondent April 04, 2015
The suspect had confessed to killing ASI Shahbaz in 2005 near Yusuf Plaza. PHOTO: FILE

KARACHI:


The prosecution against alleged target killer, Ubaid alias K2, apparently lost its ground on Saturday when a key witness in a policeman killing case failed to identify the accused before a judicial magistrate.


Ubaid, an alleged worker of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement, was arrested during the March 11 raid at the party headquarters, Nine Zero, and was recently implicated in the murder case of a police officer. According to the police, the suspect had confessed to killing ASI Shahbaz in 2005 near Yusuf Plaza. The suspect had, however, pleaded innocent but the anti-terrorism court had sent him on remand on Thursday.

On Saturday, the prosecution presented the suspect before a district Central civil judge, Ali Suleman, amid security provided by the police and Rangers. They also brought a key witness along with them to record his statement and for identification. The witness, whose identity was kept secret, deposed before the judge that Ubaid had killed the policeman before his eyes.

The court then asked him if he could identify the suspect, to which he agreed. Minutes later, a dozen men were lined up before the judge and the witness was asked to recognise the culprit. The witness pointed out the wrong person. The process was repeated twice, each time with a different arrangement but the witness still could not identify the accused. The court, then, wrote in its observation that the witness failed to identify the suspect.

At least four cases of possession of illicit weapons, explosives and murder have been registered against Ubaid since the raid. The suspect is currently on physical remand in all these cases.

Published in The Express Tribune, April 5th, 2015.

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