Seminar: ‘Many Indians seek guidance from Allama Iqbal’s poetry’

Published: December 5, 2012
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Delhi University professor told those present that for about two decades, from 1947 to 1960s, not many Indians approved of Iqbal and mentioning his name was frowned upon. PHOTO: FILE

Delhi University professor told those present that for about two decades, from 1947 to 1960s, not many Indians approved of Iqbal and mentioning his name was frowned upon. PHOTO: FILE

SARGODHA: 

More and more Indians are getting to know Allama Muhammad Iqbal’s work, said Prof Dr Abdul Haq of Delhi University at a seminar on Monday.

The seminar Understanding Iqbal in India was organised at the University of Sargodha’s MBA Hall.

The Delhi University professor told those present that for about two decades, from 1947 to 1960s, not many Indians approved of Iqbal and mentioning his name was frowned upon. Now, he said, Iqbal’s poetry could be found pasted in several areas of India and Kashmir “in shops, bookstalls and even homes”. People seek guidance from his work, Dr Haq said. He mentioned a Mumbai newspaper, Inqilab which, he said, regularly carried Iqbal’s poetry.

He said it was a tribute to the great poet that a poem that he wrote in 1904, Lab pay aati hai dua ban kay tamanna meri, was recited the world over. Dr Haq said he was always amazed by the quality of Iqbal’s work, “His maternal tongue was Punjabi but he wrote excellent poetry in Urdu and Farsi.”

Dr Haq

The professor said he respected Iqbal’s work because it focussed on the Holy Prophet’s (pbuh) love for Allah.

Dr Haq suggested that the University of Sargodha and Delhi University should sign an agreement which would facilitate a student-exchange programme between the two varsities.

Vice Chancellor Prof Dr Mohammad Akram Chaudhry, on the occasion, said that Urdu was one of the most widely spoken languages of the world. He said Bollywood movies had become immensely popular when producers and directors stared making films in Urdu. They used to make films in Hindi, Gujrati, Tamil and other local languages, Dr Chaudhry said, but they weren’t popular.

He said Iqbal was respected and loved decades after his death because his poetry had been inspired from the Quran. Iqbal set a new standard in Urdu with his poetry, the VC said, and took Urdu and Farsi ghazals to a new level.

Published in The Express Tribune, December 5th, 2012.

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Reader Comments (3)

  • Falcon
    Dec 5, 2012 - 7:55PM

    I think it is unfair to portray Iqbal in purely religious symbols as the speakers tried to do, Iqbal was also a great philosopher.

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  • Dec 6, 2012 - 3:15AM

    Iqbal was product of Anglo-Muslim culture and well versed in European and Indian languages.He subscribed to German philosophy_ the so called idealist school of Hegel. To dub him as a religious zealot would be definitely wrong.

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  • Dec 11, 2012 - 7:30PM

    Thank you for this article.

    There are also many non-Indians (such as myself) who seek guidance from Allama Iqbal’s philosophy and vision. He speaks to all.

    Many thanks to the Express Tribune for featuring articles about Iqbal from Khurram Ali Shafique. They are eye-opening.

    All good wishes,

    robert

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