Sanam Baloch responds to separation rumours

For the past few weeks, the media had been circulating news regarding actor’s separation from her husband


Entertainment Desk October 12, 2018
PHOTO: SANAM BALOCH/INSTAGRAM

Famous TV star and morning show host Sanam Baloch recently appeared on the Samina Peerzada web show, where she opened up about her childhood, career and marriage.

The past few weeks have seen the media circulate news regarding Sanam’s separation from her husband Abdullah Farhatullah. However, neither the actor nor her husband have confirmed or denied the news.

Sanam Baloch and Abdullah Farhatullah: PARTY ALL NIGHT, Mr and Mrs Abdullah Seja celebrates their mehndi in Karachi. PHOTO: FILE

She finally addressed the issue in Samina's talk show where she liftd the lid on several questions pertaining to her marriage.

When asked about Farhatullah, the Durre Shehwar star commented, "It (marriage) happened really fast. We were close friends for a long time and we thought that's how we would spend our life. He's a lovely person."


Her Dastaan co-star then inquired if the two were still friends. To which Sanam simply responded, "No. We're not." Shedding more light on her personal life, the Kankar star opened up about her childhood, her family and how she made her way to showbiz.

Marium Mukhtar  Marium Mukhtar

"I was three when my parents separated. We were five siblings and being a Sindhi feudal family, all of us were asked to live with our father. Since my parents were cousins, it was a huge conflict when it came to our custody," she said.

Sanam further added that her mother used legal procedure to receive guardianship. "My mother took a stand against the so-called feudal system of our country. She is a very strong woman," shared the actor.

The Daam star went on to add that she was lucky to have been so young when the conflict between her parents arose, so she doesn't  remember much.


"I'm sure I'll be criticised for it - that children from a broken marriage are more emotionally stable than those from an abusive one," Sanam said. "Why, you may ask? When your kids see you fight all the time, there will be additional stress on them than kids whose parents have separated."

The Doraha star continued."When I was 13 or 14, I called my father for the first time. Since then we've continued talking to each other. I served as a bridge when it came to reconciling us siblings with our father."

Sanam was last seen essaying the role of Kiran in TV drama Kankar. PHOTO: FILE PHOTO: FILE

Divulging about how she entered showbiz, the star said, "I never thought I'd work in the entertainment. Whenever I was asked about what I'd want to be when I grow up, I always used to say 'I'll become the prime minister of Pakistan.'"

"It was Sabrina (Sanam's older sister) who first started a career in the entertainment. This was her dream," Sanam commented. "In our family, working in showbiz was considered an insult. So imagine how hard it must have been," she continued. " But while Sabrina bagged a show at a local Sindhi channel, I used to sit in the audience and cheer her on."

sanam

"It was only when I got my own show at the same channel and invited Fahad Mustafa as a guest, that I was referred to a director, who was looking for a lead for an Urdu drama," she revealed. "But the only hurdle I was facing at that point was that I didn't know how to speak the language."

Sanam said she was persuaded by her elder sister to pursue acting and that's when she made her TV debut with Kaalak - a role which made her a star overnight. "The night my teleplay was on air, Sabrina received calls from numerous directors, asking about me. I shaved my head for that show and the character was brilliant. I became a star overnight," she said.

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COMMENTS (1)

Dash | 3 years ago | Reply Still she didnt confirmed or denied the separation rumours.
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