Suspected Congo patient dies at Nishtar Hospital

Saleem was suffering from respiratory problems


APP December 20, 2017
Saleem was suffering from respiratory problems. PHOTO: FILE

MULTAN: A suspected Congo patient died at Nishtar Hospital on Tuesday.

Officials said 29-year-old Saleem, a resident of Mailsi District, was admitted to Nishtar Hospital on December 18 (Monday).

They added the patient was suffering from respiratory problems and was shifted to ventilator at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where he breathed his last.

When contacted, Nishtar Hospital focal person for Infectious diseases Irfan Arshad said that Saleem was a suspected case of seasonal influenza.

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He added that tests of the patient were conducted at the hospital and they were awaiting the report to confirm whether or not he was suffering from seasonal influenza.

Arshad maintained, “The condition of such patients deteriorates swiftly and this happened with Saleem too.”

He said that the patient also suffered cardiac arrest on Monday night.

Meanwhile, Fazlain Bibi, a resident of Shah Jamal, Muzaffargarh, is also a suspected Congo patient who is being treated at ICU, he said.

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The onset of Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is sudden, with initial signs and symptoms including headache, high fever, back pain, joint pain, stomach pain, and vomiting. Red eyes, a flushed face, a red throat, and petechiae (red spots) on the palate are common. Symptoms may also include jaundice, and in severe cases, changes in mood and sensory perception.

As the illness progresses, large areas of severe bruising, severe nosebleeds, and uncontrolled bleeding at injection sites can be seen, beginning on about the fourth day of illness and lasting for about two weeks.

Published in The Express Tribune, December 20th, 2017.

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