A giant iceberg turned this tiny Canadian town into an unlikely tourist hot spot

Surrounded by shallow water, the iceberg is estimated to be about 150 feet at its highest point


News Desk April 20, 2017
Surrounded by shallow water, the iceberg is estimated to be about 150 feet at its highest point. PHOTO: TWITTER

A giant iceberg awe-struck onlookers, helping make a small town in Canada one of the country's top most tourist spots, the CBC News reports.

The Easter weekend in Newfoundland saw flocks of people hit Avalon Peninsula, off the coast of Ferryland to catch a glimpse of the iceberg - taller than the one that sinked the Titanic, causing major traffic on the Southern Shore highway.

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Resident Don Costello told CBC that the area was "swarming with people" eager to take a photo. "Good Friday it was pretty busy but Sunday it was really blocked out there too," Costello told CBC's St. John's Morning Show on Tuesday morning.

Surrounded by shallow water, the iceberg is estimated to be about 150 feet at its highest point. Despite having moved slightly, it looks like its here to stay.

"It’s the biggest one I've ever seen around here," Adrian Kavanagh, the mayor of the town told Canadian Press. "It’s a huge iceberg and it’s in so close that people can get a good photograph of it."

Kavanagh himself was surprised by the number of tourists, he said the 'onslaught' showed people were interested "in that kind of stuff." He told the newspaper that hundreds of people made the trek from the surrounding area and Saint John's - an hour's drive away. "You can see off in the distance on a clear day, you can see five or six big bergs," he added.

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Icebergs are made through calving - a process where chunks of ice break off from the edge of a glacier, the Telegraph said. History's most infamous iceberg, that came off a glacier in Greenland, of the 1912 Titanic mishap was around 10 feet tall.

Apart from tourists, social media too has been bitten by the iceberg too.









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