Benazir assassination: Cell phones of suspects recovered

Suspect's cell phones has now opened new leads for the investigation team.


Express January 30, 2011

ISLAMABAD: In the latest development in the Benazir Bhutto assassination case, the  joint investigation team conducting the inquiry has managed to recover the cell phones of two leading suspects.

Prior to this, the suspects in the case SP Rawal Town, Superintendent Police Khurram Shehzad and former CPO Saud Aziz both refused to provide the cell phones they had used on the day of Bhutto's assassination. Both suspects initially claimed that they had lost their sets, and  later also reportedly provided the investigation team with fake phones.

In an earlier report in The Express Tribune, Public prosecutor Chaudhry Zulfiqar had revealed that the police officers had not given the mobile phones which they had used on the day of the assassination.

“Saud Aziz gave mobiles phones of 2008 and 2009 models. After forensic laboratory tests it was proven that this phone was not used by the police officials and in fact was in the use of Ramzan, a resident of Karachi,” the prosecutor maintained.

The unique International Mobile Equipment Identity number on the suspect's cell phones has now opened new leads for the investigation team. The most important lead is the numbers of several government officials with whom the former suspects had been keeping in touch on the day of the assassination.

COMMENTS (15)

observer | 10 years ago | Reply Quite shameful for both the police officials. They were running the business of policing and investigations in the crime. Look at their behaviour, they know the importance of the cell phone and they are trying to hide the evidence like a typical criminal.
Anwer+Kamal+Pasha | 10 years ago | Reply Main reason of washing the crime scene was to remove the sims of mobile of attackers.
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