Assessing Imran Khan

Published: November 27, 2012

The Writer is a PhD Scholar at West Virginia University in the US

There is voluminous literature in social and management sciences on the personality and qualities of a leader. There are many forms of leadership such as charismatic, political, and spiritual. Theorists and authors have consensus that a successful leader should be cool-headed, a good listener, polite to his subordinates/colleagues, respect opposing views and make good judgment. As far as the personality of a leader is concerned, three components are important: character, world view and style. According to political scientist Dr James David Barber, these characteristics develop during childhood, adolescent and adulthood years, respectively. All of us have two fundamental orientations or dimensions in our personalities: active-passive and positive-negative. The active-passive orientation denotes a leader’s energy to effect the environment around him. The negative-positive attributes his reactions to what he does either as optimistic or pessimistic. In the light of these two dominant theories, I analyse the leadership of Imran Khan. There are four types of personalities: 1) active-positive; 2) active-negative; 3) passive-positive and 4) passive-negative. Imran Khan fits in the category of an active-negative type personality that is ambitious, striving upwards, power-seeking, impulsive, aggressive, pessimistic and preoccupied with ‘I’m succeeding’ (“tsunami aa raha hay”). Sometimes, the type can have a vague and discontinuous image, persistent problems in managing aggressive feelings and contradictions between relatively intense effort and low reward. This type of personality has two other traits as it little enjoys its work and has very low self-esteem; however, Imran has the opposite. He derives much enjoyment from his work and has a high sense of self-esteem.

Apart from the above-mentioned philosophical and theoretical analyses, Imran Khan has tremendous potential and opportunity to lead the nation if he objectively reviews his personality. It is interesting to note that all politicians who left the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) had differences only with Imran, not with the party or programme. Most of them blamed Imran for being arrogant, inflexible and unpragmatic. Imran is not the ‘man of people’ given his lifestyle and attitude. He also flip-flops on both national and international issues. However, as far as the strengths of Imran are concerned, he has charisma and aura. He is a great philanthropist and fundraiser and an amazing social/community worker. He is energetic, brave and popular among the youth and women. Most importantly, he has a huge and unparalleled organisational capacity or political machine for elegantly using social/electronic media and the latest technological tools to raise money and hope among the people. He also has support, both moral and financial, of the upper class overseas Pakistani community. But I would like to remind all of the fact that leading a nation of 180 million people is absolutely different from captaining an 11-member cricket team.

I agree that there are other factors besides leadership for achieving political success. However, I do not agree that Imran is emerging like Zulfikar Ali Bhutto in the late 1960s. Bhutto emerged in a ‘vacuum’ due to the lack of general elections for the past 24 years. Political parties and politicians had no opportunity to test their ranks. But after Ziaul Haq, there have been eight general elections from 1985 to 2008 and the next election is scheduled soon. Politicians and parties have been participating in those elections. There are two major political forces in the country, the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) and the Muslim League, along with some other regional and national parties. There is no ‘vacuum’ in politics at all and there is little space for a third major political force. Imran’s vote bank is the same as that of traditional right-wing votes, which will absolutely be divided. His vote will benefit the PPP alliance in rural parts of the country just as the PPP alliance votes could benefit Imran in urban areas of Punjab. Collectively, this will badly hurt the Muslim League.

As far as young voters are concerned, the youth matters in a huge constituency, as in the US presidential elections where the whole nation votes for only one man but not in a parliamentary form where constituencies are small and controlled by traditional, cast-ridden and hereditary politicians. The major drawback with the PTI is the dearth of electable or winnable candidates in the party. Imran needs over 2,000 candidates/covering candidates all over the country to contest on all seats in all assemblies of Pakistan. Does the PTI have these numbers? The answer is simple: no.

Published in The Express Tribune, November 27th, 2012.

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Reader Comments (71)

  • Falcon
    Nov 27, 2012 - 1:23AM

    Few things:
    1. I don’t get how a person could be pessimistic and be pre-occupied with ‘I am succeeding’ and also have a high self-esteem. The first two attributes are contradictory.
    2. Most of the people didn’t leave because of him they left because of the insecurity that comes with influx of new people and that they might not get an easy ticket after inter-party elections. Ask PTI insiders and you will get the answers.
    3. You are making an assumption of PPP vs. anti-PPP electoral patterns. You have to also consider anti-incumbency sentiments and the fact that Pakistani voter doesn’t like to waste his vote. So, that means the battle will be actually between pro-PMLN and anti-PMLN vote and most of PPP voters will fall in the lap of PTI.

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  • Uqaab
    Nov 27, 2012 - 1:31AM

    Ok, another one here. Except the theoretical first paragraph everything has been repeated in every other column about Imran. Nothing new. By the way, those who left his party due to him being arrogant, infelxible, mostly did not join any other party. There are no better options. We’ve been dealing with flexible and corrupt politicians for too long now. Maybe honest and inflexible is the way to go now. Fingers crossed and prayers with him.

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  • Sultan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 2:02AM

    TestRecommend

  • Mirza
    Nov 27, 2012 - 2:44AM

    A nice scientific analysis of the subject. Thanks ET for this pragmatic Op Ed. There are a couple of points that I would add here.
    While the captain of cricket team IK was not famous for his democratic style or popularity among the players. He has been a lifelong leader of his own party. The real leaders emerge at a younger age and do not bloom after retirement age. The raw talent and character is built early in life as the Op Ed suggests. The great leaders do not continue to make wrong decisions in their own lives till late. All the leaders of Pakistan and India who have won the independence were known for a successful career in law and not banking on other people’s money all their lives. From Mr. Jinnah to ZAB they had the answer to the question what have you done for making a living? They were a political legend even in their 30′s and 40′s. Their source of power was the poor masses of the country not well to do living outside the country.

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  • sabi
    Nov 27, 2012 - 3:18AM

    In my view a leader is one who can change wrong perceptions deep instilled in nation’s psychie.If one fails to do so, is not worth calling a leader..A nation like Pakistan has its vast share of wrong perceptions created by establishments.May it be a stand on religion and state.nuclear weapons. programs and it implications on Pakistan economy kashmir at any cost,secular constitution is a threat to religion idealogy of Pakistan is a glory for Pakistan, Huge army is the need of Pakistan,politicians are corrupt therefore army’s intervention is fair. etc etc.IK has done nothing but to ride on these perceptions to make his way into politics.
    IK is not leading the nation but following the nation.He is not a leader.It needs vision and courage he has none.

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  • sam
    Nov 27, 2012 - 3:55AM

    Well, nobody is perfect and all the people cannot agree at one point. It is the scheme of world. You have described the Khan’s personality in somewhat accurate way but you have not at all given him a reasonable credit for his qualities of inspiring and dragging the youngsters and middle and upper-middle class in the political process. . He is also trying to establish his party on democratic basis. It is not only beneficial for PTI but for the rest of the parties and for the political process too. Khan has given a new life to political activities in Pakistan. At the moment we cannot expect that Khan sweeps in the upcoming elections and will make government (because his party is just taking start). People raise objections then why he makes big assertions? He can make, because he thinks he would do all these, and he has courage, strength and belief upon him. I believe that at the end of the day if he remains (he will be) successful in establishing a strong political party it will be a great success and it will destroy the corrupt culture and change the spoil system. It is called “Tsunami of Insaf”.

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  • Kamal
    Nov 27, 2012 - 4:34AM

    Simply useless!

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  • Taimoor
    Nov 27, 2012 - 7:32AM

    So you begin with Imran to get a personality check, then do the typical “electables in the party” attack. When he gets electables the whole of pakistan whines about them being the old guard, when he gets new the whole of pakistan whines that they are not experienced. So what the heck do you want. People leave his party because he is doing what a democratic party is suppose to do have elections and have people stand on merit. Its obvious those that left want things on a silver platter, like they are entitled to it. Imran has done a fine job if his personality was a problem then his accomplishments would have been colossal failures. These are perhaps the oldest arguments I have read, back when he hadn’t done the lahore jalsa. Think of some better critiques professor.

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  • S.R.H. Hashmi
    Nov 27, 2012 - 8:18AM

    Deccribing personalities, the wrier quotes four types: 1)active-positive; 2)active-negative; 3)passive-positive and 4) passive-negative, and places Imran Khan in the active-negative type – stating further that this type of personality little enjoys its work and has very low self-esteem, but Imran is opposite: he derives much enjoyment from his work and has a high sense of self-esteem. To me, that makes his classification rather dubious. In any case, it is rather too broad, to be meaningful.

    I think traits of a good leader, compiled by Santa Clara Univesity and th Tom Peters Group, detailed below, are a better guide:

    Honesty, competent, forward-looking, inspiring, intelligent, fair-minded, broad-minded, courageous, straightforward, imaginative.

    Judging our ‘prominent’ leaders who are ruling the country at present, and/or have done so in the past, we find that nearly all of them fail miserably on the very first count, making them unfit even to sit the test

    The second conclusion would be that Imran Khan is well qualified to sit the test, and hopefully, pass it with honours.

    Karachi
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  • Ch. Allah Daad
    Nov 27, 2012 - 8:19AM

    PTI has lost momentum, Tsunami has become Badnami.

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  • Azeem
    Nov 27, 2012 - 8:45AM

    A poorly written article with dearth of analytical thinking, could have been better as a blog post !!

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  • Topak Khan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:15AM

    term paper on imran khan? err

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  • KH
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:16AM

    So you are suggesting he should go for same traditional politics and get land lords as cadidates. What Imran is trying to do is change the face of polictics in Karachi. And this is why people will vote for him. In sha Allah

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  • Rasikh
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:27AM

    I was struggling to understand the term “arm-chair analyst” but now I do. Thanks for explaining THAT, although you didnt intend to.

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  • talha
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:54AM

    This is very balanced written article and a true picture for PTI and Imran khan to know the realty before time and manage deficiency accordingly.

    But as usual, what I believe, Imran and their immature youth will react badly on it and will never realize their faults to counter the competition.

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  • Amanzeb Khan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:55AM

    Fair assessment. Two things I would like to disagree with. One, I dont believe Imran flip flops on national and international issues. If anything, he has an inflexible view of things which does not change with changing circumstances. The “flip flop” accusation is only propraganda from his distractors. Secondly, the concept that PTI will divide the right wing vote and benefit PPP is wrong. More disgruntled PPP/ANP supporters have moved across to PTI than PML-N. You can see that clearly in the numbers. PTI is actually breaking the division of right/left wing as its ideology is not based on these principles.

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  • UMSyed
    Nov 27, 2012 - 10:56AM

    Imran is not a team man. Remember his speech after lifting the World Cup trophy in 1992. He never mentioned the efforts of his team mates. Even today when he talks, it is only ‘Me & I’. You can not expect a young man to let go of his ego at the age of 60.Recommend

  • Khan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 11:26AM

    PTI Zindabaad
    I will definitely vote for him and ensure that everyone i know votes for him.
    Sick of all other fraud parties and fake leaders
    Imran is the only true leader

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  • gp65
    Nov 27, 2012 - 11:46AM

    @Author: The 4 Presidential styles described by Berber, in The Pulse of Politics arrived at by answering the question related to 2 attributes:

    1) Activity or Passivity

    How much energy does a president invest in his presidency?

    2) Positiveness or Negativeness toward the job of president

    Does the president enjoy his job? Does he enjoy exercising power? Does the job make him sad or discouraged?

    Ofcourse Imran is still not the premier of the country and we will find out in due course whether he does become one. But if we use this framework to classify his leadership style, then he would come across As Active answer to question 1 and by your own admission as Positive in answer to question 2. Thus his type would be Active Positive.

    @Falcon: I think the contradiction that you pointed to in question one arises as the author has misclassified Imran’s leadership style.

    Inherently all 4 types of PResidents have been successful in US, so unlike what the name might suggest a Passive Negative President was not necessarily worse for the country than an Active Positive President, it depended on what the times called for. One of the most famous Passive Negative Presidents in fact was George Washington (note this is his classification as a President in the book, not as a leader because as a leader of the army ofcourse he was certainly not Passive).

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  • 3footninja
    Nov 27, 2012 - 11:46AM

    wonderful!… can you shed some light on “leadership” please? I’m sure you’ve been a leader all your life, having achieved more than petty things like a world cup victory, a cancer hospital that everyone dissed as unviable, a university that no-one thought would survive in the wilderness, and a setting up a democratic political party from scratch in this land of equal opportunity and fairness. you are a phd scholar, so you SURELY must know better about leadership than imran…

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  • AAb
    Nov 27, 2012 - 12:08PM

    Dear Author – We would have been better served as readers if you had done a comparative analysis of the other leaders using the same critera. Can you do that in your next article?

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  • Liaqat Yousufzai
    Nov 27, 2012 - 12:37PM

    A good drawing room analysis….

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  • Liaqat Yousufzai
    Nov 27, 2012 - 12:38PM

    A drawing room analysis…

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  • ASIM
    Nov 27, 2012 - 12:47PM

    Media made leaders fly soon

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  • Abbas
    Nov 27, 2012 - 12:58PM

    Nice article! One thing I like to add up here is that in multi party politics one doesn’t afford to have hard or taut lines otherwise the situation becomes as of N league right now. Optimizing the behaviors is pre requisite for a leader in this globalized automated world. Further, PTI is failing to impress again and again by not contesting the elections. In an interview, Mohtarama BB answered a question about her biggest mistake in politics and she replied that “not contesting the 85 elections and consequently we lost Punjab and still PPP is facing the consequences”. I wonder that how IK, PTI and their blind followers assume a clean sweep victory?

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  • Zaid
    Nov 27, 2012 - 1:01PM

    The thing we need to do is: change this constituency system and bring presidential system in the county as is in US. The society like Pakistan where literacy rate is much low, people don’t know the value and worth of their vote. Presidential system can bring a big change in Pakistan as it will be easy for the people to choose one from the two candidates.

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  • Moazzam Salim
    Nov 27, 2012 - 1:05PM

    Bhutto was a prodigy of Gen. Ayub Khan which meant Bhutto’s political life started with the help of the State machinery. He was given a portfolio out of the blue and for a young man of almost thirty years of age it was a big advantage. Bhutto later turned against his mentor and encashed his earlier political success given to him by a military ruler. Any comparison with Khan is not going to do justice to Khan’s politics which has spanned more than a decade with relentless pursuit of his political vision. One can differ with the political and social views professed by Khan but cannot argue with his continuous struggle in the political arena which differentiates him markedly with the kind of support and push that Bhutto got in the earlier days of his political career.

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  • mian khaliq
    Nov 27, 2012 - 1:10PM

    yes

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  • Shahzad
    Nov 27, 2012 - 2:33PM

    My Vote is for Imran.

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  • Nawaz
    Nov 27, 2012 - 2:50PM

    Imran Khan is truly the only leader the people of Pakistan can vote for if they want to change the destiny of this great country. We have tried all the other leader more then once and they all have failed miserably. People want change. People our sick with all the garbage which they have to choose from. PTi is the only party which gives hope to the people of Pakistan. Change will come only if we all show up and vote for it. Trust me PMLN MQM ANP and PPP don’t have any plans to fix the problem Pakistan is facing. They have showed us over and over again. Now is the time for Pakistan to wake up and vote for real change and PTI is the only party which offers us that. So as many people have already predicted that PTI will sweep i too say for the hope of Pakistan’s future that PTI sweeps and comes into power. This is probably the first article written in EP which isn’t bashing IK and PTI. About time EP. Pakistan Zindabad.

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  • waqar
    Nov 27, 2012 - 4:25PM

    Where did you get your PhD from???you contradicted every thing you started with.

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  • zaf
    Nov 27, 2012 - 4:59PM

    this is a unique way to analyze someones personality, its attributes and its relevance with the job that person is looking for. i think writer needs to elaborate more about the theories of leadership especially when it comes to political leadership. he needs to apply it not just on IK but all other politicians so youth could get the idea of what theories talk about our star figures.

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  • Nov 27, 2012 - 5:21PM

    @Moazzam Salim:
    “Bhutto was a prodigy of Gen. Ayub Khan which meant Bhutto’s political life started with the help of the State machinery…..”

    @Moazzam Salim: What you said about Bhutto is an irrefutable fact. He may be compared with IK if you wish so. But @Mirza please do not mention MA Jinnah in the same breath as that other guy. If you have not woken up to the fact that there is a slight difference between the maker of a country and breaker of the same. The only parallel of your hatred for Jinnah can be found in JI and its founder.
    .
    That amply explains the removal of Quaid’s portrait from the presidential palace.

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  • Bilal Choudry
    Nov 27, 2012 - 5:36PM

    My friend which scientific method did you use to come up with your conclusion that PTI doesnt have numbers? The author comes up with the his conclusion without any numbers on vote banks or approval ratings. This wouldnt pass for a assignment essay for high school. Seems like anybody can write an article these days.

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  • Mohammad Assad
    Nov 27, 2012 - 5:42PM

    Now this was just boring.

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  • samir
    Nov 27, 2012 - 5:59PM

    No hero worship for me… sorry… I’ll go local whoever is best for the job

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  • Azeem Aslam
    Nov 27, 2012 - 5:59PM

    Good analysis but I am not depressed bcoz we hope that our tomorrow will be better than today.

    We will vote PTI. Come what may.

    We want to change two party system at any cost.

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  • TraxRider
    Nov 27, 2012 - 6:01PM

    Read this somewhere “Commanders command, managers manage, leaders… well they just inspire”. The time of instruction is long gone. This is the time of inspiration, something that IK may realise in due course.
    Another very interesting thing taught in management courses is “under-promise but over-deliver”. What little I have observed of his political manifesto, its sprawling. He is promising heaven and earth to his supporters whereas the problems of Pakistan can be summerised in only one work which is also part of the name of his party, INSAF, justice. He should only focus on that and deliver that. If he can deliver justice, other thinks will fall in place automatically.

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  • Sultan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 6:29PM

    @AAb:

    Dear Author – We would have been better served as readers if you had done a comparative analysis of the other leaders using the same critera. Can you do that in your next article?

    No need to bother the author, I can provide a quick comparative analysis based on modified Myer Briggs Type Indicator:

    Nawaz Sharif: Megalomaniac-Loser. Fully developed tendencies of narcissism. Wanted to have himself declared “Amir ul Monineen.” Can barely read and write–all orders come from the seat of the pants. Lazy, lethargic–sleeps till 10:00 am and wants badami milk for breakfast to mimic Mughal rulers. Poorly educated and brought up. Completely unfit to rule.

    Asif Zardari: Victim-Loser: A true scavenger living off of the sympathy generated by the death of his spouse, who was a leader. Power crazy, always scheming and plotting to extend his rule. Utter disregard for the welfare of the same downtrodden people that vote for his party. Clever user of money (Benazir Income Support scheme) to buy loyalties. Medieval, supersticious, unscientific mindset –believes in black magic. Poorly educated and brought up.
    Completely unfit to rule.

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  • Arsalan Ahmad
    Nov 27, 2012 - 7:13PM

    a drawing room analysis, with no ground research…hate guys like these who write on intricate matters of a state, sitting in another corner of the world

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  • Something Clever
    Nov 27, 2012 - 7:18PM

    Shame on you, author. You’ve broken the heart of many boy-crushed Pakistani males : /

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  • sabi
    Nov 27, 2012 - 7:19PM

    Mao Se Tung was a great leader.He came at a time when chinese nation had lost all its moral
    and and estem because of opium.The nation on the whole got addicted to this drug and was unwilling to to quit it.This man didn’t promis to give them more opium but no opium.He struggled and in the end he got his nation get rid of that deadly drug.He is the founder of modern china.He was a leader who changed the direction of his nation against all odds.
    Is there anyone in Pakistan who can tell this nation that religion is a private matter between God and man.and second Kashmir should not be our demand to normalise relation with India.

    third ,secular constitution doesn’t mean ban on religion but freedom for every religion, faith,beliefs.Last, can tell the nation it’s not politicians but establishment responsible for all that disastar.Who is going to fight against these odds? at the present no one,We don’t need opium givers we need opium snatchers.

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  • Nov 27, 2012 - 7:39PM

    @Something Clever:
    “Shame on you, author. You’ve broken the heart of many boy-crushed Pakistani males : /”
    .
    Should have guessed about the Freudian underpinnings behind this worship.

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  • Mirza
    Nov 27, 2012 - 8:11PM

    @Moazzam Salim:
    @Abid P Khan:
    Sir all I was saying is the real leaders do not appear after 60 years of political wilderness and loss of many elections. This God given talent comes out by itself from the initial days. Pakistan was made by a great leader Mr. Jinnah who was a leader from the very start at every stage of his life. These great leaders did not live on other people’s money. They have their own brilliant careers in law all on their own.
    Pakistan was made by politicians and ordinary people not army. It was broken when Jinnah’s capital was moved farthest away from East Pakistan by an army dictator so it was out of reach for Bengali masses. Then a drunken womanizer general lost it due to atrocities against the people East Pakistan and Bengali still hate those generals and the army not Pakistani civilians. Pakistani civilians did not go to East Pakistan to commit atrocities no matter what some people say. It was the army and their rightwing militant militias who are still dreaded and hated.
    Regards,
    M

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  • Amna Shah
    Nov 27, 2012 - 8:16PM

    I would like to agree with the above proposition especially with the aforementioned statement that politics is far much a different field than captaining an 11-member cricket team. Although he(Imran Khan) bears the talent but he still needs to improvise his personality and objectives as he seem to be a bit ignorant of POLITICAL DYNAMICS!

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  • 3footninja
    Nov 27, 2012 - 8:22PM

    @Sultan:
    lol!!!! (watch out for noora trolls)

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  • Sultan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 8:55PM

    @Abbas:

    I wonder that how IK, PTI and their blind followers assume a clean sweep victory?

    It may be news to you but the answer is very simple: by vigorously contesting the upcoming elections and beating the crap out of the old guard!

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  • Sultan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:01PM

    @UMSyed:

    Imran is not a team man. Remember his speech after lifting the World Cup trophy in 1992. He never mentioned the efforts of his team mates. Even today when he talks, it is only ‘Me & I’. You can not expect a young man to let go of his ego at the age of 60.

    Really? Youn don’t suppose all the bricks in SKMH just lifted themselves up on their own and amalgamated into the finest charity cancer hospital in Asia? Or Namal University?

    A young man needs his ego to accomplish great things. Now, please go back to your mundane life worth nothing to no one other than you and yourself.

    Watch out, more inane typing expected!

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  • Sultan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:02PM

    @Something Clever

    I think @Something Idiotic will suit you better as a screen name–you always leave a trail of drivel wherever you leave a comment!

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  • Falcon
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:14PM

    @gp65:
    That was informative. Thanks.

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  • Falcon
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:16PM

    @UMSyed:
    If you get a chance, please do read his book. He has mentioned a number of times on many occasions that he is still guilty of making that self-centered speech. Isn’t it sad that people change but our biases towards them don’t?

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  • Sultan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 9:54PM

    @Falcon:

    If you get a chance, please do read his book.

    Read? You must be kidding. Noora League darbaris don’t read–they just take orders and follow!

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  • Sultan
    Nov 27, 2012 - 10:21PM

    @Amna Shah:
    he still needs to improvise his personality and objectives as he seem to be a bit ignorant of POLITICAL DYNAMICS!

    And the great subcontinent thinker/leader/piffle producer, Amna Shah, who can single handedly smear an entire lipstick on her mouth to set an example for the young, is giving free lessons in leadership. Imran, please do not miss this great opportunity to learn Political Dynamism aka Muk Mukka!

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  • Kamran Naqvi
    Nov 27, 2012 - 10:23PM

    The kind of criticism by PoTI trolls speaks volume about their immature dictatorial mindset. The author is quite logical in his analysis that PTI is relying on right-vote bank and voting for PTI will benefit PPP!
    Exactly a similar situation occurred in 1993-elections when Pakistan Islamic Front was created (financed through Younis Habib), which led to the breakup of right-votes and PPP was the winner.

    This is the time for all logical & educated people of Pakistan to recognise this conspiracy and prevent recurrence of the same blunder.

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  • aiisha
    Nov 27, 2012 - 10:28PM

    sir No one can pro cast the future of politics in pakistan … pakistan is changing like the clock

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  • ishaq
    Nov 27, 2012 - 10:44PM

    so what u mean?
    i did not understand.
    there is no one else in the field.
    its very simple.
    1)zardari 2) nawaz sharif 3) imran khan
    think and chose one.

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  • Nov 27, 2012 - 10:54PM

    @ishaq:
    “…there is no one else in the field….”
    Yes.To quote Hamlet, something is rotten in the Kingdom of Denmark.

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  • Sultan
    Nov 28, 2012 - 2:32AM

    **@Abid P Khan:

    @ishaq:
    “…there is no one else in the field….”
    Yes.To quote Hamlet, something is rotten in the Kingdom of Denmark.**

    And the current two alternating jokers ruling us reminds me of another Shakespeare play, Macbeth

    Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn, and caldron bubble.

    Vote PTI.

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  • UMSyed
    Nov 28, 2012 - 7:43AM

    @Sultan: What I said was regarding a completely different aspect of Imran Khan’s life. As far as his hospital & university projects are concerned, remember Pakistanis are a nation with a very high inclination of giving out charity. By the way, liking someone does not mean that you ignore his weaknesses.Recommend

  • 3footninja
    Nov 28, 2012 - 10:34AM

    @UMSyed:
    you clearly don’t seem to get it do you? let me repeat what Falcon had said, again. please read this aloud in slow motion until you fully grasp the depth and meaning behind it. i know you can do it:

    ‘Imran Khan has apologized on television, AND in his book, that what he said 20 years ago was selfish of him and a mistake on his part.’

    he has the courage to admit that what he said was wrong. he is no saint and makes mistakes in life just like all other mortals do. get it???

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  • Sultan
    Nov 28, 2012 - 3:19PM

    @UMSyed:

    @Sultan: What I said was regarding a completely different aspect of Imran Khan’s life.

    Imran will make you eat crow on this one too. He is the only politician that competes in the public sphere based on ideology and has been consistent thoughout on the basic tenets of what he believes in. He is instilling a true spirit of democracy through intra party elections, paving the way for use of technology to help propel political maturity amongst the masses by giving them a direct stake at the push a button that, in a small but potent way, empowers the individual. He is bringing financial accountability to the forefront of politics and is also putting in place a modern political fundraising structure to eliminate the opaque exchange of lifafas, etc. He is going to take away the gravy train called “development” funds from legislatures and give the funds it to the people to invest on issues that they face directly, not some tamasha project like laptops to buy votes. Then legislatures will become just that, legislatures and focuss on devising laws that improve society, not fill their pockets. This is a huge project but Imran is the only one who can rise to this challenge like the other challenges before–the rest are just lazy, lethargic relics of the old order who should be flushed down the drain along with their coterie of darbaris and sychophants. If he succeeds, you and other tax cheaters like you will find Pakistan an exteremly harsh place to live–you will have to change your ways or be ostracized. You have no idea what is coming out to hiit you!

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  • Safeer
    Nov 29, 2012 - 8:47PM

    It must be conceded that the past four and a half years of an elected PPP-led coalition government have been some of the toughest for any elected government in our history. Not only has the government been under pressure if not siege from the cast of usual suspects, including the military and an overly assertive judiciary, the opposition has blown hot and cold in terms of cooperation with, and also stubborn resistance to, the present dispensation. The challenges faced by any government taking over after the traumatic assassination of Benazir Bhutto and the depredations left behind as a legacy by the Musharraf dictatorship would have tested the most resolute of political leaderships. PPP had no quantum of solace since it came into power. Historically you can analyze this fact that PPP was never given a smooth ride to run this country. Constant leg pulling, conspiracy, palace intrigues and mudslinging always hindered process of delivering. Yet PPP is stick to strengthen democracy in this country.Recommend

  • business.” by Lenny Bruce.|”Money doesn’t make you happy. I now have 50 million but I was just as happy when I had 48 million.” by Arnold Schwarzenegger.|”None can love freedom heartily but good men the rest love not freedom, but license.” by John MiltRecommend

  • Shakeel N
    Dec 2, 2012 - 12:50PM

    A nice read. IK has certain personality. He has some positives and negatives like any person in the world. Definitely he has to think and work on it a bit (Probably on “impulsive behavior”).
    The author categorized him as “Active-Negative” probably due to “pessimistic”, “aggressive” and “power-seeking” attributes. Let me discuss these one by one:
    1) I strongly disagree with author terming IK as “pessimistic”. How can a person giving “Hope” to others, be “pessimistic”? He is always optimistic even when others discourage him for ‘seems-to-be-impossible’ things. I don’t think SKMH and NAMAL University would exist if he were pessimistic.
    2) The author rightly said he is aggressive, but aggression is not always bad. His aggression is for the country situation and injustice etc, and not for his personal matters. I believe every sincere Pakistani should be aggressive if he cares about his country. My analysis is Imran Khan is hard on politicians/rulers, but soft on country-fellows. He is the one who says talk to local militants, not because he loves militancy, but because they still are Pakistanis.
    3) Again, the author wrongly assessed him as “power seeker”. If he were power-seeker, he had many chances to do so. But he didn’t. We hear him saying ‘we will sit in opposition instead of making alliance with ruling status-quo parties’. However he is leader by nature, he want to be on top and lead from the front.Recommend

  • Oh No!
    Dec 2, 2012 - 4:57PM

    This type of personality has two other traits as it little enjoys its work and has very low self-esteem; however, Imran has the opposite. He derives much enjoyment from his work and has a high sense of self-esteem.

    Good to know!

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  • Oh No!
    Dec 2, 2012 - 5:00PM

    Its articles like these, thanks to Phds like you, that re affirm my vote for Imran Khan.
    Pakistan Zindabad.

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  • Oh No!
    Dec 2, 2012 - 5:13PM

    People say that if Imran succeeds in becoming a statesman, he will have achieved more than any other cricketer. Yet what he has achieved already – setting the philanthropy and politics aside – is quite incredible. As a bowler, his Test average, economy, and strike rate are all better than Wasim Akram’s, which is a huge statement when you consider that for two years in his prime, Imran had to sit out with a stress fracture of the shin. And though his career Test batting average is only in the high 30s, it jumps to 52.34 in his 48 Tests as captain; astonishingly this is higher than the corresponding figure for Steve Waugh, Ricky Ponting, Sachin Tendulkar, Clive Lloyd, Allan Border, Sunil Gavaskar, Inzamam-ul-Haq, Len Hutton, and yes, even Miandad.
    Despite all the criticism including this article, Imran is quietly (and sometimes not so quietly) steaming ahead. If you take a panoramic view of his life and career, the quality that most dominates is focus and single-mindedness in the service of a lofty goal.
    Its this quality you missed in your article. I sincerely hope you can come to assess people better than this article.

    Recommend

  • Abbas
    Dec 3, 2012 - 3:58PM

    @Sultan: You may vote for IK, its your right. But pardon me that like other PTI supporters you have nothing to say except eulogical phrases. My question was genuine and based on historical remarks by one of the top leaders Pakistan ever had. Giving a sweeping statement is nowhere near to a logical answer.

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  • usman faryad
    Dec 4, 2012 - 6:54PM

    i do agree with the writer..Imran khan no doubt is rigid in attitude and behaviour..how culd a man with rigid attitude along with can lead a team??? Team is leaded by tactics and a piece of which he do”nt have exept tsunaami.Recommend

  • usman faryad
    Dec 4, 2012 - 6:56PM
  • Khalid Mahmood
    Dec 7, 2012 - 12:04AM

    Excellent analysis. Keep it up.

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