What are we afraid of?

Published: April 22, 2012

The writer is a lawyer and partner at Ijaz and Ijaz Co in Lahore [email protected]

What image is summoned to mind when you hear the words ‘aam admi’, ‘common man’ or the ‘average’ Pakistani and various lazy permutations? Admittedly, one uniform sentiment would be that he is impoverished and downtrodden. However other than that, is he a Punjabi or Sindhi, a Muslim or a Hindu, a Sunni or Shia, etc.? I am aware that I can be accused of being fatuous here since a monolith uniform national identity is very rare in almost any country of significant size. Still, because of the intensity and the frequency with which the common man is referred to in evening chat shows, it might be useful to have a semblance of an idea about his identity. It is a shame that we can’t find him and ask him directly. At this point, raising the objection of what about the ‘common woman’ might come across to some as being unnecessary nitpicking.

There may be a variety of easy and over-capacious answers to the question of our national identity, but when stripped of the fairly spurious reasoning, in essence the singular defining feature remains that we are Muslims. In an order of priority, we as a nation are first Muslims and then Pakistanis. An almost natural corollary of this is that we ascribe a vaguely divine mandate to the creation of this country.

In recent times, there has been a lot of talk about the creation of a separate Seraiki province. Most major political parties agree to the idea in principle, and all of them agree that it should be done on administrative ground and under no circumstances on ‘ethnic’ grounds. The terms, ‘ethnic’ and ‘ethnicity’ are mentioned cautiously almost as if they were foul words. The ostensible reason for that is that a Seraiki and a Hazara province on ethnic grounds will increase polarisation and provincialism, as opposed to a united national front of solidarity. However, as I have said earlier, we have very little idea of what precisely is that united national front, apart from the fact that all of us are supposed to be Muslims. Uniformity is overrated, and on most occasions undesirable, and at any rate is impossible in our case. Once one concedes the cold, hard fact most of the parameters of this fortress of Islam have been decided not by any direct divine intervention, at least none susceptible to empirical scrutiny, but by a British lawyer, Sir Cyril Radcliffe, it might be easier to be open to the possibility of changing these lines.

However, we are fair in our use of imprecise terms; ‘minorities’ is a term which does not refer to the numeric strength of a community, but often used as a blanket term for all those outside the fold of Islam. Muslim in Pakistan does not have a fixed connotation either, as the Ahmadis know too well. I think now it would take a fantastic level of ignorance or stubbornness to deny that the Hazara community in particular and the Shias in general in Pakistan are being murdered through an orchestrated scheme. In public discourse barring a few fanatical religious party leaders, nobody goes so far as saying that the Shias are a ‘minority’, at least not yet. I say this without any in-depth information, but they are being targeted because they do not fit the image of the ‘average’ or model Pakistani, which at the risk of generalisation it seems is now the image of a Sunni, Punjabi male. It has to be a cause of alarm when in the middle of this mayhem a party named Sunni Tehreek enters into mainstream electoral politics. As far as the Punjabi part, some of you might have noticed that any grievance coming outside of Punjab is always a ‘game’ or a ‘card’.

Jean-Paul Sartre’s essay Réflexions sur la question juive on “Anti-Semite and Jew” should be read and re-read in Pakistan to understand our reaction to the Shia genocide. The most arresting and prescient are the passages regarding the liberal democrat’s attitude towards anti-Semitism. The democrat, unlike the fanatic, does not hate the Jew and is driven by good faith. However, in his quest to view things from an objective and universal point of view he refuses to acknowledge the individual existence of the Jew and ends up being as Sartre puts it “feeble protector”. The democrat says, “There are no Jews”, and he says, “‘there is no Jewish question’. This means that he wants to separate the Jew from his re¬ligion, from his family, from his ethnic community, in order to plunge him into the democratic crucible whence he will emerge naked and alone, an individual and solitary particle like all the other particles”. This display of almost metaphysical amorality is piercingly relevant to us again, for the Shia, for the Baloch, the Seraiki. The reluctance to recognise the possibility of a fight for self-determination in Balochistan and the desire of the Seraiki people to want recognition of their own and the genocidal proportions of violence against the Hazara Shia are almost driven by the same sentiment. The crucible we seek to plunge individual identities into is that of a national, one dimensional Pakistani identity, based rather flimsily on notions of the two-nation theory. Hence, I in no way attribute maliciousness on the part of our intelligentsia, yet clarity in language and thought become considerably more significant in causes such as these. The line between silence and complicity becomes indiscernible after a certain point, and that point has long passed.

Does all of this mean that a Pakistani identity or even Pakistan is not important enough to fight for? Absolutely not, precisely the opposite. As is often the case, the people who most mistrust the sustainability of our nation are those who shriek the hoarsest about the ideology of Pakistan. The desire for everyone to be like everyone else is a petty one, and whose ambition is to be like a clone anyways. Diversity and even some degree of polarisation are not to be feared and are even necessary if we are to evolve a shared identity.

Published in The Express Tribune, April 22nd, 2012.

Reader Comments (44)

  • Max
    Apr 22, 2012 - 12:41AM

    If one happens to be Hazara Shiite or other Shiite, Ahmedi, Buddhist, Christians, Hindu, Jews,or Sikh, there, obviously, is no place for them in Pakistan. What a shame?
    We question their religious beliefs, their patriotism, and impose our nonsensical value system upon everyone else. Does not this tell that we are the worst type of hate-mongers and racists on the face of the earth. Dig deep and the problem lies with to what some call “two-nation theory.” What a mockery have we made of epistemology of the term “theory.”
    Shame on us and more so on myself as I have done nothing to get rid of these dark clouds.

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  • Azhar Siddiqui
    Apr 22, 2012 - 12:43AM

    If new provines are being built than it is the ideal time for also building a new Mohajir province.
    Why are Mohajirs not being given the right that our Hazara and Saraiki brothers are being given?

    If Saraiki and Hazara provinces are being built than why not a new Mohajir province also?

    The ppp and its allies have a clear majority in the Sindh assembly. A new Mohajir province can be immediately created by the PPP and its allies in Sindh.

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  • Hasan Awan
    Apr 22, 2012 - 12:44AM

    A nice article and he is right that diversity must be celebrated in Pakistan rather than thriving for one uniform definition. But at the same time i would stress one important point and that is what i have seen in Europe and that is in every society ways and means are developed to integrate the migrant population overtime. Same should be the case within Pakistan.
    If we can develop some ways and means to integrate everyone within a certain identity that exists in Pakistan then it would be a great thing.
    For instance the latest definition of Punjabi in Punjab is based on geographical and cultural one and it is a peculiar identity within Pakistan and this definition successfully integrated migrants in Punjab and their subsequent generations identify themselves as Punjabis and Pakistanis. Similarly one must define that a person living in Karachi and speaking Urdu and Pushto can be a Sindhi or not??. If they are not then how to broaden our definition so that their next generation will call themselves Sindhis. Same should be the case in KPK, South Punjab regions and in Balochistan that what is meant by Seraiki, Balochi and a Pakhtoon . Is it a language, is it a culture, is it geographical location or is it race that defines one ethnicity?
    The diversity is itself a beauty on its own but a diversity should not marginalize anyone but rather it should welcome assimilation to accommodate everyone to have a one homogeneous society within one region.

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  • Fahad Khan
    Apr 22, 2012 - 12:46AM

    It’s interesting to note that none of the columnists, anchors or bloggers mention the Muhajir sooba when they talk of new provinces being made . There have been multiple rallies,demonstrations and protests in Karachi for the creation of a new Muhajir sooba just like the Saraiki sooba in Punjab.

    The ppp leadership which is very active and highly vocal for a new province in Punjab should be
    equally active and vocal for a new Muhajir sooba in Sindh.

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  • BlackJack
    Apr 22, 2012 - 12:49AM

    I agree – and hope that this is not the case with liberal democrats in Pakistan, who are probably the last hope for all the non-Sunnis whom you indicate. But the same blindness that you refer to is exhibited in the two statements that emerge routinely after any instance of terrorism (domestic/international) or violence/ oppression/ discrimination against minorities – which somehow absolves everyone (including the liberal democrats) of responsibility: (1) Islam is a religion of peace, and (2) There is no compulsion in Islam. The fact is that Islam is as Islam does – and in today’s world, muslims are the ones who use their religion as a pretext to wage war or murder innocents.

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  • ashok
    Apr 22, 2012 - 1:11AM

    You asked, “What are we afraid of?”

    My answer would be “REALITY” or “real face in the mirror”

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  • Arindom
    Apr 22, 2012 - 1:25AM

    Pakistan should take the Indian route ( with all it’s imperfections) – Unity in Diversity.
    Reserve jobs for minorities, promote minorities – witness the number of dispropotionate number of minorities at the top in India. This required confidence – does Pakistan have it?

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  • Ali Tanoli
    Apr 22, 2012 - 1:39AM

    Like Ayub khan says in his book Friends not Master that dont ever break the fedral system
    in the name of provinces in pakistan we did this now we gotta face these problems and why
    not we were just indians then Hindu, Muslims them indo paki now punjabi, pathan, Muhajir,
    sindhi. we dont stoped here shia sunni, and sariaki, Hazarawall. may god help us and give us
    some good leader who can unite and lead us.Recommend

  • Logic Europe
    Apr 22, 2012 - 2:21AM

    sir I am a great fan of yous and I live in England .you are probably the best thinker in Pakistan at present.Only problem is your english!! it is too heavy and an obstacle in dispersing your excellent analysis of the ills of Pakistan IT IS TOO CLASSICAL it needs to be contemporary

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  • Arijit Sharma
    Apr 22, 2012 - 2:24AM

    @author: ” … As is often the case, the people who most mistrust the sustainability of our nation are those who shriek the hoarsest about the ideology of Pakistan. … “

    “That’s how I know he can be beaten. Because he’s a fanatic. And the fanatic is always concealing a secret doubt.” ( George Smiley in the movie Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy )

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  • Apr 22, 2012 - 2:51AM

    Well said and great examples.

    The insincere unity pandering many make, is more like a ‘HUSH NOW’ cover to avoid discussing major minority, ethnic and sectarian and other demographic issues of the country, for the comfort of a stable status quo hegemony which entails a privileged majority.

    True unity is when everyone, especially the majority, shows deep empathy in straight forward words and action for other communities, especially minorities.

    Consider the fact of how difficult it is just to have people acknowledge Jinnah’s own non-Sunni Shia background, simply because it doesn’t fit into the dominant religious nationalist narrative.

    The best examples of where ‘the other’ thinking is employed is when politics is discussed along ethnic lines. Compare the high ethnic charge of Karachi politics as compared to Lahore.

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  • adeel759
    Apr 22, 2012 - 4:33AM

    Our ideals were flawed, our ideas have failed. Pakistanis as a nation are quite racist, dishonest, Be Imaan, hate mongers and religious to wrong limits. We are against the values of 21st century, we are not inclusive, pluralistic, receptive and absorbing. Pakistani society is totally opposite of a diverse society that has become the beauty, need, strength and engine of growth for every nation for the times to come. We are bogged down in negativism. We hate our fellow countrymen on numerous grounds, we despise our certain neighbors in the region and many countries across globe. We are clueless people when it comes to who to look up to, we have no leader of greater wisdom and eloquence who could lay the future principles and plans for the nation and draw the lines of morality and immorality to 200 million humans walking the Land Of Purely Impure. In this country of Pure, immorality has become Absolute Normal. Honesty has become Rare Pakistan Moral and despicable practice to exercise. Opposition generates debate which in turn creates ideas and offers new perceptions and dimensions to look at things, and we admire subjugation and oppression of opposing voices and disallow debate which is depriving the nation of diversity of ideas and ideals. Pakistani nation needs absolutely new beginning with New Ideals and New Ideas from New Leaders with New Friends and No Foes.

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  • Maryam
    Apr 22, 2012 - 4:56AM

    We are Not ONE in Pakistan: let’s embrace it and Not be Afraid of it. A must read for every Pakistani!!……..This should be made part of the Syllabus, I must say. Thank you for writing this.

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  • Mirza
    Apr 22, 2012 - 7:31AM

    When I was born in Pakistan, Arabic was introduced to my ears first along with the mother tongue Sindhi/Seraiki. While growing up I was overwhelmed by Urdu, and Punjabi culture in addition to my own. In school I was forced to take Persian as a second language as there were only two options in my school and Arabic was tougher for me.
    Now I think in my native Sindhi/Seraiki, talk in Urdu and write in English. I do read Arabic and try to imitate the Arabs but they don’t think much of us Pakistanis. We hate India and Indian culture and their way of life but we cannot have a wedding without the Indian Songs and dances and other traditions. Long ago I was taught Persian but at that time there were no Arabian petrodollars and Pakistan’s national anthem is all Persian except just one Urdu word none Arabic. We have not changed our Anthem but I cannot even say Khuda Hafiz which is in the last line of my anthem. Who am I, where do I belong, nobody wants me or likes me? Even we don’t like us and are killing each other; my future looks bleak and hopeless.

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  • Apr 22, 2012 - 7:40AM

    @Max: No society is perfect and Pakistan has its flaws. But to suggest that minorities have no place in it is factually incorrect. Please do a little research and you’ll find members of each of the minorities you mention in significant positions. You’ll find 100,000 Hindus in Karachi that fashion designer Deepak Perwani said were “thriving”. You’ll find Hazara girls flying fighter jets in Pakistan Air Force. You’ll find Shias such as President Zardari and Prime Minister Gilani as part of the ruling elite, etc etc.

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  • Shehzad Shah
    Apr 22, 2012 - 8:05AM

    Saroop, the Sunni Tehreek is in fact not an anti-Shia outfit, though they have a militant wing also. ‘Sunni’ in this context means follower of the tradition of the Prophet, not specifically ‘Sunni’ in opposition to ‘Shia’. The ST belongs to the Barelvi school of Sunni Islam, which has a far more inclusive record in Sunni-Shia sectarian history compared to the Deobandis, the other major branch of South Asian Sunni-ism. The Barelvis have their own kind of extremism now unfortunately, mainly to do with blasphemy against the Prophet & are strong supporters of the infamous blasphemy laws.

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  • Zulfiqar Ali
    Apr 22, 2012 - 8:22AM

    Though an interesting article; I just wanted to point out that if Shia’s are being targeted in the Land of Pure, it’s not b/c of the ordinary Sunni Muslims. They are being butchered by the terrorists. Any person who kills an innocent person b/c of his/her believes cannot be a true believer of any religion, be it Islam, Christianity or Judaism.

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  • kaalchakra
    Apr 22, 2012 - 9:21AM

    Pakistan’s unity derives from its inherent oneness – that all Pakistanis worship the same One God, follow the One Prophet, and lead their lives according to One Book (other than those who are dhimmis).

    Pakistan’s unity does NOT follow from Punjabi being Punjabi, Mohajjir being Mohajjir, Balochi being Balochi and Pushtoon being a Pushtoon (let alone a Hindu being a Hindu or a Christian being a Christian.)

    Recall, the great Quaid had said – Hindus will STOP being Hindus, He didn’t say Hindus will become even more Hindus so we can celebrate somebody’s idea of ‘diversity’ whatever that means.

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  • kaalchakra
    Apr 22, 2012 - 9:47AM

    “liberal democrats in Pakistan, who are probably the last hope”

    Liberals Pakistan’s last hope? On the contrary, they are a mere nuisance, a hindrance, an irrelevant detail. They have never amounted to anything in the past, and never ever will. They have no ideology that they can sell to Pakistani people (who, quite rightly scoff at their attempts to sell them snake oil in the name of Veena-Malik lite ‘liberal Islam’).

    You Hindus need to accept Pakistan as it is, instead of placing your ‘hopes’ in a bunch of eternal teller of tall tales and never-do-any-real-gooders.

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  • Apr 22, 2012 - 10:54AM

    @Max: No society is perfect and Pakistan has its flaws. But to suggest that minorities have no place in it is factually incorrect. Please do a little research and you’ll find members of each of the minorities you mention in significant positions. You’ll find 100,000 Hindus in Karachi that fashion designer Deepak Perwani said were “thriving”. You’ll find Hazara girls flying fighter jets in Pakistan Air Force. You’ll find Shias such as President Zardari and Prime Minister Gilani as part of the ruling elite, etc etc.Recommend

  • Arijit Sharma
    Apr 22, 2012 - 11:57AM

    @Riaz Haq: ” … You’ll find Hazara girls flying fighter jets in Pakistan Air Force. … ”

    Rewind. There were Bengali fliers in PAF. I’d assign those girls desk duty.

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  • Concerned
    Apr 22, 2012 - 1:07PM

    I happened to watch Najam Sethi late night show on Geo TV a couple of days back who clearly blamed the state for not taking any action against LeJ and other groups who are killing Shias/Hazaras at regular intervals. He pointed out that each thana knows where the killers are hiding/residing but the police refrains to take any action against them either being too afraid or are under orders from the ruling politicians in discharging their duty. Under such circumstances how will the minorities live in Pakistan ??

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  • Logic Europe
    Apr 22, 2012 - 1:52PM

    undeserving people did not deserve a state ,they cant live together ,one extreemist trying to overcome other extreemist, honestly people would have been safer in india

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  • Parvez
    Apr 22, 2012 - 3:28PM

    Nicely argued but believe me, no one is listening.

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  • Haris Chaudhry
    Apr 22, 2012 - 4:23PM

    @ kalchhakra:

    Having read both of your comments, one can understand why Pakistan is called a global-migraine (as was well put by then US Secretary of State Madeline Albright).

    Its thought processes like yours which essentially manifests themselves in the society that we have become today !

    Congrats..

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  • Logic Europe
    Apr 22, 2012 - 4:44PM

    @kalckakra sir ,you Qaid has been proved wrong and must be feeling sorry for the mayhem he caused in the subcontinent , life is unsafe in Pakistan for Muslims more than in India
    you can’t be all worshiping one God as you have so many sects and all of you call each other kafir and kil each other

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  • politicaly incorrect
    Apr 22, 2012 - 6:20PM

    @kaalchakra

    There is very little I can add to @Haris Chaudhry’s response to your drivel, except that on this page you have even excelled yourself.

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  • Lala Gee
    Apr 22, 2012 - 6:46PM

    @Azhar Siddiqui:

    “Why are Mohajirs not being given the right that our Hazara and Saraiki brothers are being given?
    If Saraiki and Hazara provinces are being built than why not a new Mohajir province also?”

    Mohajir province as well as Seraiki and Hazara provinces shall and will never be created. Not that I have something against my Mohajir, or Seraiki, or Hazara brothers and do not want them to be given their due rights, but because this is not the right way of doing a right thing. Moreover, even the right things done at wrong time produce undesired results, as this not the right time to create more chaos than is already there. The countries where the administrative divide is based on ethnic lines, like UK, are still facing ethnic tensions of varying degrees. In my opinion, when we have some stability in the country, then administratively dividing the whole Pakistan into 15 to 20 provinces is a right solution for the better management and devolution of power to the local population. Another solution could be the revival of District Government system.

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  • Seema
    Apr 22, 2012 - 8:05PM

    @Ali Tanoli: Ayob’s One unit was a disaster, which federal system he was talking about the one he introduced in Bengal and other smaller provinces, he imported bureaucracy from Punjab to other provinces and undermined their loyalties as Pakistani, that is the reason we are sindhi, Balochi Pashtun now seraiky. Zia’s federal system sow the seed of religious fanaticism when he created monsters of Mujahdeen , and try to linger on his rule.

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  • kaalchakra
    Apr 22, 2012 - 8:15PM

    My liberal friends appear to have lost faith, if they ever had any faith, in Islam’s divine mission to unite people in a brotherhood of equality, love, and justice. They have no reason to promote one God, one Prophet, one Book.

    The rest of us know better.

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  • Lala Gee
    Apr 22, 2012 - 8:32PM

    @Fahad Khan:

    “There have been multiple rallies,demonstrations and protests in Karachi for the creation of a new Muhajir sooba just like the Saraiki sooba in Punjab.”

    There have never been any such violent demonstrations for Seraiki province as were for the Hazara or Muhajir provinces. Although some voices have been raised by people having vested interests or the misguided ones by such people, but the majority perhaps do not support or at least not fervently support the demand of Seraiki province. A large number of educated, technical, and skilled people from Seriaki belt are working through out the rest of Punjab and they may not like to lose the greater opportunities presented to them. Further, significant number of seraiki people are living in Lahore, including the Prime Minister, and other cities and are well integrated by inter-marriages. They would definitely not like the rift to be created between their Punjabi neighbors and relatives. Moreover, creating a true Seraiki province require some parts to be included from upper Sindh and KPK making it a very complicated phenomenon. The only solution for the time being is to restore the District Governments so that the resources utilization is delegated to the local people.

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  • Lala Gee
    Apr 22, 2012 - 8:46PM

    @BlackJack:

    “The fact is that Islam is as Islam does – and in today’s world, muslims are the ones who use their religion as a pretext to wage war or murder innocents.”

    You mean Christianity is what Christians did to Jews during Holocaust, or what they did in Vietnam, Korea, Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, and elsewhere.

    Judaism is what they did and are doing to Palestinians.

    Hinduism is what they did to Kashmiri Muslims (only killed 90,000 of them), or what they did to Babri Mosque, or in Gurat and Mumbai riots, or what the did to Sikhs in 1984 riots (only killed 5,000 of them)

    please check this link “Self-pity” for your own betterment.

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  • Lala Gee
    Apr 22, 2012 - 8:54PM

    @ashok:

    “”You asked, “What are we afraid of?”
    My answer would be “REALITY” or “real face in the mirror””

    The exact same is true for you also. Check my reply to @BlackJack: for some details.

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  • Lala Gee
    Apr 22, 2012 - 9:05PM

    @Arindom:

    “Pakistan should take the Indian route ( with all it’s imperfections) – Unity in Diversity.
    Reserve jobs for minorities, promote minorities – witness the number of dispropotionate number of minorities at the top in India. This required confidence – does Pakistan have it?”

    Would you dare telling the ET readers the current percentage of Muslim population in India and the overall percentage – let’s forget the top positions which are even lower, let alone disproportionate – of Muslims in the Indian civil and military services, or in the banking or financial services.

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  • Suresh
    Apr 22, 2012 - 9:08PM

    @kaalchakra Pakistan’s unity does NOT follow from Punjabi being Punjabi, Mohajjir being Mohajjir, Balochi being Balochi and Pushtoon being a Pushtoon

    Up routing a civilisation this way will have very serious consequences!

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  • politicaly incorrect
    Apr 22, 2012 - 11:39PM

    What are we afraid of?

    Ourselves. Yes we are afraid of ourselves.A nation, a large chunk of whose populace can’t decide one way or the other what it’s identity is, is bound to fall prey to the comfort of delusional grandeur of all possible varieties between moral (religion) and physical (genetic)superiority over all others who are not their mirror image.
    Feeling of insecurity breeds inferiority complex which in turn creates fear.

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  • Haris Chaudhry
    Apr 23, 2012 - 3:53AM

    Kalchakra says: “My liberal friends appear to have lost faith, if they ever had any faith, in Islam’s divine mission..”

    So very typical of the people like you.. When disagreeing with someone, always question their faith and their intentions and label them as kafir and apostate to settle score..

    No wonder we are doomed as a nation…

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  • kaalchakra
    Apr 23, 2012 - 4:27AM

    Suresh

    What you call ‘uprooting’ civilization, we call replacing old and tired ways with the beauty and power of a resplendent fresh civilization – that of Islam alone.

    We look forward to the day –

    “When true pangs of brotherhood are established in human mind
    (so) their roots are also established in the heart, and not in water and earth” (Iqbal)

    Brotherhoods of ‘water’ and ‘earth’ do not move us – our aims are high and outside of human bounds.

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  • Apr 23, 2012 - 5:14AM

    I know what you are afraid of. It’s that without the bigotry of anti-Hindu, anti-Shia, anti-Semitic hatreds filling Pakistani souls the country will be reduced to merely North India – the two-nation theory utterly discredited and an entire political and military elite shamed by thoughts of inferiority and quaking at the looming prospect of being made redundant by reunification.

    ” in no way attribute maliciousness on the part of our intelligentsia, yet clarity in language and thought become considerably more significant in causes such as these. The line between silence and complicity becomes indiscernible after a certain point, and that point has long passed.”

    So the challenge for the intellectual class is to find a way to justify a Pakistan without all the hate.

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  • Lala Gee
    Apr 23, 2012 - 12:44PM

    @Logic Europe:

    “undeserving people did not deserve a state ,they cant live together ,one extreemist trying to overcome other extreemist, honestly people would have been safer in india”

    Let’s not talk about Muslims, especially the Kashmiri Muslims. How safe were the Sikhs in 1984 Sikh Riots? Or, how safe are the Christians in India? Or, how safe are even the Human Rights Activists in India?

    You must be ashamed of yourself posting this comment.

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  • kaalchakra
    Apr 23, 2012 - 2:51PM

    Well, there is no need for liberals to worry. Our friends Aakar Patel and Sushant Sharma from India have concluded that Pakistan has ‘learnt from our mistakes” and we will all become like Indians and Pakistan will become another India. Heaven on earth is here, folks. Our dreams have been realized.

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  • Salman Sheikh
    May 4, 2012 - 2:41PM

    New Provinces = More Ministers = Less pay for common man = hike in prices = new govt expenses = more provincial differences = less water = every provincial govt has its own tax net to capture the poor = royalty issues = worst economic conditions = more blood shed

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  • Salman Sheikh
    May 4, 2012 - 2:42PM

    No ordinary Pakistani is afraid of provinces they are afraid of the looters

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  • Ghassan Khan
    May 15, 2012 - 9:20PM

    The main problem in our society lies in the definition of Islamic democracy. Our people believe that accepting cultural diversity is banned in Islam. Anyone with such a school of thought should study the Charter of Madina, which showed a very hospitable aspect of Islam towards Jews. Some also consider it to be the foundation of state building.

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