Women and the peace process

Published: March 7, 2015
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The writer is a senior sub-editor at 
The Express Tribune and tweets 
@FarahnazZahidi

The writer is a senior sub-editor at The Express Tribune and tweets @FarahnazZahidi

They lose their fathers, husbands, sons and brothers in acts of terrorism and violence. They themselves are injured and killed. Yet, the women of Pakistan do not have a voice in the peace processes in the country. They are stakeholders and direct effectees of terrorism but have no say in how it should be handled. If there is one thing that glared out at the (in)famous All-Parties Conference (APC) post the Army Public School attack, it was this: there were no women present. With the exception of perhaps, Sherry Rehman, women have hardly ever been included in the most important discussions in the country. As we gear to celebrate the International Women’s Day tomorrow, it remains a bitter truth that Pakistan’s women are considered good enough for things that we call ‘fluff’. They have a voice in health, education and other developmental issues. But there is a deafening and forced silence when it comes to their perspective on peace-building and conflict resolution strategies at all tiers, whether it is the aman jirgas or the National Action Plan (NAP).

In the year 2000, the UN Security Council resolution (UNSCR) 1325 on women, peace and security was adopted. This resolution recognises the need to increase women’s role in peace-building in conflict-ridden countries. However, the scope of 1325 is much wider. It not only calls for women to be included in peace talks, it also presses for a more gender-sensitive perspective to consider the special needs of women and girls during conflict, repatriation, rehabilitation, reintegration and post-conflict reconstruction. The UNSCR 1325 focuses on issues of gender-based violence and refugee camps covered in Articles 10 and 12. Thus, the impact gets wider. Post the October 2005 earthquake and the 2010 floods, to name two natural disasters in Pakistan that caused massive damage and human displacement, women trafficking increased.

Since 2000, 48 countries have adopted NAPs on Resolution 1325 to make policies to fulfill the resolution’s objectives. Developing and conflict-affected countries use NAPs to support women’s participation in politics and peace processes, as well as commitments on protection from sexual and gender-based violence. Yet a less than one-fourth of UN member states have implemented these NAPs.

Pakistan has not implemented 1325. Neither has India. It is rather curious that a resolution is unanimously hailed as a step in the right direction, yet is not implemented by the government. While many activists and proponents of women’s rights in Pakistan agree in spirit with 1325, it is not without reservations. The human rights’ camp remains discretely divided over the issue. And the reason is simple. Accepting a UN Security Council resolution comes with its share of possible consequences — consequences in the form of the proverbial ‘boots’ and sanctions. Many feel that such resolutions have other ‘agenda’, which is why Pakistan, among many other countries, remains sceptical of it. Other peace and gender activists strongly assert that Pakistan has no national action plan on 1325 not just because it is afraid of sanctions but because the much-needed political will is missing. These activists regularly urge the government to implement 1325.

The reasons can be debated. But the fact remains that across the globe, from 1992 to 2011, only four per cent of signatories to peace agreements and nine per cent of negotiators at peace tables were women. In Pakistan, the numbers would be even lower. The pandemic of violence against women and girls affects one in three women worldwide, and conflict zones are the worst hit. This correlation is often missed out.

Perhaps, a less controversial and more effective way would be to go via the CEDAW Committee’s landmark General Recommendation (GR 30) on Women in Conflict Prevention, Conflict and Post-Conflict Situations. This was adopted on October 18, 2013. Pacifist and more realistic voices from the civil society feel that implementing GR 30 could also have the desired results. But even if these resolutions and recommendations are implemented, will the Pakistani woman at the grassroots level have a say, alongside the men, regarding how peace should be achieved? It is time this conversation starts, and a narrative around this is built.

Published in The Express Tribune, March  7th,  2015.

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Reader Comments (3)

  • Toticalling
    Mar 7, 2015 - 9:43AM

    The status of women is really bad in the country. I agree when a husband or father is killed, she has nowhere to go. And yet nobody talks about them. I hear many husbands marry more than one wives and hardly anybody thinks about the tears of the first wife. Majority of women are not allowd to walk freely out of vthe house.
    Yes the most important task for Pakistan is to give more rights to women. I am sure few think about this.Recommend

  • Parvez
    Mar 7, 2015 - 1:52PM

    Madam you are blowing in the wind…….but lets be honest, blow you must because someone MAY hear you….even if its the birds.
    Aren’t women religiously inclined ?……of course they are, but do we have any women sitting on the Council of Islamic Ideology ?
    I’ll go out on a limb here and say the real reason for this is that the men folk are afraid, yes afraid, that a determined woman may show them up……so they prefer to ostracize them and get on with the process of ‘ look busy, do nothing ‘ as displayed in the NAP. Recommend

  • Mar 7, 2015 - 2:27PM

    Wonderful piece of writing. So empathetic and readable. I think the issue is justice and good human behaviour, not simply the rights. Speaking of just rights seems to be politicizing a perfectly good humanistic issue. You talk of women’s rights; what about children’s rights? Then minority rights? Not leaving out animal rights? What we must strive for is to emphasize humane behavior in our society.Recommend

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