FBR finalises modalities for capital gains tax

FBR has decided that the 10 per cent capital gains tax will be applicable on day trading of equities.


Mobin Nasir August 27, 2010

KARACHI: The Federal Board of Revenue (FBR) has decided that the 10 per cent capital gains tax will be applicable on day trading of equities. The decision came on Thursday during a meeting between FBR officials and the committee on capital gains tax set up by the Karachi Stock Exchange (KSE).

Sources privy to the meeting informed The Express Tribune that it has been decided that day trading will be treated as ‘within six months investment activity’ and that the ‘respective 10 per cent tax rate will apply.’

They added that stock purchases under the new Securities Lending and Borrowing Act will be taxed similar to previous leverage products and that the ten per cent tax on the spread earned by the margin financier or margin trading funding provider will be treated as full and final liability.

Margin trading

KSE board members were expected to convene a meeting with KSE Chairman Zubyr Soomro on Thursday but the meeting was postponed. Approval of the new margin trading system was stalled when Soomro raised concerns over its risk management capabilities. Experts assert this has led to low volumes and falling equity prices.

“There is a general consensus that multiples of main board needs to come down for trading comfortably,” contended Hasnain Asghar Ali, an equity analyst.

However, other stakeholders have expressed hope that the approval will be obtained in the coming week.

Published in The Express Tribune, August 27th, 2010.

COMMENTS (1)

nasim ahmed | 11 years ago | Reply tax will be deducted from the clients by the members on day trading,who is going to deposit the same in Govt treasory,besides how the record has to be maintained,nothing seems to be clear. How about other trading activities?
Replying to X

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.

For more information, please see our Comments FAQ

E-Publications

Most Read