Pakistani girl given liver transplant in India returns home

Hadia’s father praises Shahbaz Sharif, God, the media and the Indian people.


Shamsul Islam January 09, 2012

FAISALABAD: Seven-year-old Hadia has returned home to Samanabad, Faisalabad, after a successful liver transplant operation in India.

Hadia was suffering from chronic liver problems and her family was told by doctors that she needed a transplant. Coming from a poor family, she could not afford the expensive operation.

However, after a news channel televised a report of her plight, Punjab Chief Minister of Shahbaz Sharif used government aid to sponsor her treatment at Medanta Hospital in Delhi, India.

The Indian doctors successfully transplanted her liver and she arrived back home on Sunday. Hadia’s house was decorated to accord her a warm welcome, while neighbours also distributed sweets.

Talking to the media, the girl’s father Sajjad Khan said that “being a poor family, I could not dream even to bear the expenses of minor treatment, and such a high cost treatment was possible only with the timely help of the Punjab government – and with the blessings of Almighty Allah.

I am also thankful to the media which highlighted the plight of my daughter.”

“I also prayed for the doctors in India who were very caring and gave special attention to our child,” he said.

“Although I and so many of my friends have reservations about the Indian people, we did not see any hatred during our two-week-long stay in India”, Sajjad added.

Published in The Express Tribune, January 9th, 2012.

COMMENTS (26)

salman khan | 9 years ago | Reply

best wishes of good healthy life dear.Allah bless you

IndianSkeptical | 9 years ago | Reply

Does pakistani news channels show these medical treatments in positive light? On youtube there are many such videos reported by Indian news channel but only one from Pakistani news channel. I hope it is reported at least in local pakistani media so that common man in Pakistan gets to hear this.

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