Pakistani-American photographer fatally shot by ex-husband

Khan was vocal about her ongoing divorce, lamented pitfalls she experienced of South Asian culture as a divorcee


Web Desk July 21, 2022
Sania Khan/ Source: Facebook

CHICAGO:

A Pakistani-American photographer was shot dead by her former husband in Chicago on Monday, reported US media

Sania Khan, a 29-year-old professional, was found shot in her condominium by police who had arrived at the premises around 4:30 pm to perform a welfare check. The check had earlier been requested by police in Georgia after Khan's husband, Raheel Ahmad, was reported missing by his family. 

A police report, cited by the Chicago Tribune, stated that law enforcement agents heard a gunshot upon arrival at the scene followed by what appeared to be sounds of a man groaning in pain. 

When officers entered the premises, Khan was found dead and her former husband was found in the bedroom with a single gunshot wound to the head. US media added that a firearm was found next to the alleged shooter and a suicide note was discovered nearby. 

Ahmad was subsequently transferred to Northwestern Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival.

Read Man, woman killed in name of ‘honour’

Khan was vocal about her ongoing divorce on social media and lamented the pitfalls she had experienced as a divorced woman.

On her TikTok account, the victim shared, “going through a divorce as a South Asian Woman feels like you failed at life sometimes. The way the community labels you, the lack of emotional support you receive, and the pressure to stay with someone because 'what will people say' is isolating. It makes it harder for women to leave [a] marriage that they shouldn't have been in, to begin with”.

"It's painful to walk away from someone you once loved. But it's even more painful to love someone who is careless with your heart."

The Sun-Times reported that Khan had a double major in psychology and women’s studies and had launched her photography career on the side.

“She could make a friend out of anyone and would always be there for them during their moments,” a friend of Khan told the Chicago based editorial. “You would be hard pressed to find anyone who would say something bad about Sania because just knowing Sania added so much light to your life.”

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