PM Imran shares rare footage of ‘shy snow leopard’ in G-B mountains

Around 8,000 snow leopards are believed to be left in the wild worldwide and fewer than 400 of them are in Pakistan


APP December 25, 2021
Shy snow leopards are found in 12 countries including China, Bhutan, Nepal, India, Russia and Mongolia. SCREENGRAB

ISLAMABAD:

As the government is striving for wildlife conservations through community involvement and forestation in the country, Prime Minister Imran Khan on Saturday shared footage of a snow leopard roaming and roaring over the snowy mountains in Khaplu area of Gilgit-Baltistan (G-B).

“Rare footage of the shy snow leopard in Khaplu, GB,” he captioned the short video clip on Twitter which showed the snow leopard under a cliff with snow all around.

A few hours later, PM Imran posted another video of more snow leopards, and said their numbers were increasing due to his government's "strict policy of protecting them in their natural habitat."

Also called the “ghost of the mountains”, the snow leopards are shy and of elusive nature.

Moreover, the colouring of their coats makes them difficult to see against the snowy, rocky environment they live in. These cats are most active at dawn and dusk, which is called a “crepuscular activity pattern” by scientists.

In the Himalayas, snow leopards live in high alpine areas, mostly above the tree line and up to 18,000 feet in elevation. They are found in 12 countries — including China, Bhutan, Nepal, India, Russia and Mongolia.

Also read: Rare snow leopard cubs spotted in northern Pakistan

According to a media report, around 8,000 snow leopards are believed to be left in the wild worldwide, and fewer than 400 of them are present in Pakistan, including the G-B region, where Under Baltistan Wildlife Conservation and Development Organisation (BWCDO) is working with local village populations to help protect and conserve the snow leopard.

BWCDO pioneered livestock insurance schemes for villagers to compensate farmers against livestock losses resulting from attacks by snow leopards to ensure the apex predators and humans coexist in harmony.

After more than two decades of hard work, the snow leopard population in the area is not only surviving but thriving.

COMMENTS (1)

Hussain | 1 month ago | Reply

Snow leopards are no doubt Ghost of mountains it is not possible to sight or document them with direct sighting. There is only one way of documenting snow leopard. Thanks Mr. P M your this share will help researchers to get NOC for installing more cameras like this one to have more rare images of snow leopard.

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