South Sudan declares independence: Major world powers recognise newest member

Published: July 10, 2011
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People from South Sudan sing and dance during independence day celebrations in the streets. PHOTO: AFP

People from South Sudan sing and dance during independence day celebrations in the streets. PHOTO: AFP

WASHINGTON: 

The US, UK, France and EU announced on Saturday the decision to formally recognise the newly created Republic of South Sudan and vowed to support it.

“As Southern Sudanese undertake the hard work of building their new country, the US pledges our partnership as they seek the security, development and responsive governance that can fulfil their aspirations and respect their human rights,” US President Barack Obama said.

South Sudan’s Salva Kiir was sworn in as president of the world’s newest nation.

South Sudan’s independence comes after more than 50 years of conflict between the southern rebels and successive Khartoum governments.

The 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) that finally ended the conflict, and which was signed under intense pressure from foreign countries, particularly the US, Britain and Norway, paved the way for a referendum on southern independence in January.

Around 99 per cent of southerners voted to split from the north.

Amidst formal recognition, celebrations erupted across Juba where South Sudan proclaimed its independence.

At the ceremony attended by a host of international dignitaries, the speaker of parliament, James Wani Igga, read out the declaration of the south’s secession from the north.  South Sudan’s national flag was then raised to wild applause, tears and song. “We shall never, never surrender,” the crowd chanted, as people whistled and wiped tears from their eyes.

Sudanese President Omar al Bashir, the guest of honour, was present at the ceremony in spite of being marked ‘wanted’ by the International Criminal Court on charges of crimes against humanity in Darfur.

Concerns about future remain

In spite of the celebrations however, analysts fear violence may be reignited in South Sudan due to unresolved issues. The border the south shares with the north remains ill-defined and border disputes remain. Talks in Addis Ababa aimed at resolving disputes have so far failed.

Published in The Express Tribune, July 10th, 2011.

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Reader Comments (11)

  • Jul 9, 2011 - 7:45PM

    All the best to the new nation.

    Recommend

  • Jul 9, 2011 - 7:52PM

    All the best to the new nation.Recommend

  • ZAHOOR
    Jul 9, 2011 - 10:51PM

    what about kashmir paliastine chechenia why only south sudan and east timor

    Recommend

  • Cautious
    Jul 9, 2011 - 11:02PM

    Great news — it’s unfortunate that the entire Muslim community opposed this – but it’s also unfortunate that the entire Muslim community sat back and said nothing during the Darfur Genocide.

    Recommend

  • G. Din
    Jul 10, 2011 - 1:35AM

    Another little bite out of the future “khilafa”!Recommend

  • Jul 10, 2011 - 10:41AM

    what about kashmir paliastine chechenia why only south sudan and east timor, Muslims Should think about it

    Recommend

  • Jul 10, 2011 - 10:42AM

    what about kashmir paliastine chechenia why only south sudan and east timor, Muslims Should Think about it…

    Recommend

  • yorkshire
    Jul 10, 2011 - 3:05PM

    @ZAHOOR
    don’t forget balochistan

    Recommend

  • MKD
    Jul 10, 2011 - 8:37PM

    @yorkshire

    You are very naughty. (I am looking from ZAHOOR’s point of view.)

    Recommend

  • Khurdra
    Jul 11, 2011 - 7:46AM

    @yorkshire:
    dont forget north east indian states fighting for liberation…………:-)

    Recommend

  • Tariq
    Jul 11, 2011 - 9:57AM

    It is time for Balochistan to be free too.

    Recommend

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