WATCH: Dubai Quranic Park opens for visitors

As mentioned in Holy Quran and Sunnah, trees bearing grapes, figs, pomegranates and olives dot the park’s 64 hectares


Reuters April 09, 2019
Visitors are seen outside Dubai's Quranic Park in Dubai, UAE April 6, 2019. PHOTO: REUTERS

DUBAI: A new park that uses gardens and landscaping to tell stories from the Holy Quran has opened in Dubai, offering locals and tourists a day out with a religious twist.

Quranic Park attracted some 100,000 people in its first week, officials say, feeding demand for religious attractions in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) where Abu Dhabi’s Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is a top destination for visitors.

 Visitors are seen inside 'The Glass House', part of Dubai's Quranic Park in Dubai, UAE. PHOTO: REUTERS Visitors are seen inside 'The Glass House'. PHOTO: REUTERS

The educational park, which seeks to attract Muslims and non-Muslims alike, features 12 gardens, a “Cave of Miracles,” and a split lake symbolising Moses parting the Red Sea.

Trees bearing grapes, figs, pomegranates and olives dot the park’s 64 hectares, highlighting the medical and scientific uses of plants mentioned in the Holy Quran and Sunnah, the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH).

A visitor is seen inside the Cave of Miracles, part of Dubai's Quranic Park in Dubai, UAE. PHOTO: REUTERS A visitor is seen inside the Cave of Miracles. PHOTO: REUTERS

“My children had learned about these plants, and they had some questions about the [Holy] Quran and the miracles,” said Emirati visitor Omar al Kaabi.

“Praise God we got some answers,” he said, standing inside the greenhouse that holds some of the plants.

Visitors to the cave can learn about the story of Jesus making a bird from clay and six other prophetic miracles mentioned in the holy book, using 3D map and hologram displays.

 Visitors are seen inside 'The Glass House', at Dubai's Quranic Park in Dubai, UAE April 6, 2019. Picture taken April 6, 2019. PHOTO: REUTERS Visitors are seen inside 'The Glass House'. PHOTO: REUTERS

“It’s a nice idea, right at the heart of our Islamic religion,” said Anan al Hourani, another visitor who brought his daughters to the park on a sunny Saturday afternoon.

“At the same time, it’s recreational, with the lovely gardens, greenery and trees,” he said.

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