Winter rains: This year’s December the wettest since 2012

The showers expected to prove beneficial to winter crops


Sehrish Wasif December 14, 2017
PHOTO: FILE PHOTO

ISLAMABAD: After a gap of several years, major parts of Pakistan have received simultaneous winter showers in December, a happening that experts believe will prove beneficial for the winter crops.

According to the Pakistan Meteorological Department, yearly data shows that December of this year is the wettest since 2012. This year Islamabad has received heaviest amount of rain. It has rained also in Lahore where the previous three Decembers had witnessed no showers.

Speaking to The Express Tribune, a senior meteorologist said a westerly wave affected the upper parts of the country on Monday and caused light and moderate showers coupled with snowfall in hilly areas.

Karachi receives rain instead of heatwave

This wave is expected to come to an end on Thursday early morning in all areas except for the Malakand division, he added. “After 2012, Decembers have remained mostly dry in Pakistan. However, this year almost the entire Pakistan has received showers, which are good for winter crops,” he added.

Sharing the details, he said in December 2012 Islamabad had received 87mm of rain while this December an amount of 58mm of rain has been recorded. Lahore has received 17mm of rain.

He said in several parts of the country it was the first winter shower. “Malamjabba has received 10 inches of snow, Kalam 7 and Murree one foot of snow. After this spell which is expected to be followed by gusty cold winds, the temperature may further drop in the country,” he said.

During last 24 hours the lowest temperature, -8 °C, was recorded in Kalat, followed by Quetta -6°C and Dalbandin, Kalam and Parachinar with -5°C. Foggy conditions are likely to prevail over plains of Punjab and upper Sindh during night and morning hours.

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