Ironic that the apology came from Pakistan

Published: May 17, 2012

The writer is a senior journalist and works for DawnNews

This is the season to count the blessings of  ‘positive engagement’ with the US, the hallmark of which is the opening of Ground Lines of Communication (G-LOCS, an American coinage). The Defence Committee of the Cabinet (DCC), the highest decision-making body in crisis situations, fell just short of declaring a national holiday to emphatically send the message to Washington about how relieved it was to be proposing a new beginning in bilateral relations. The DCC’s authorisation to different heads of departments to prepare the finer details of the agreement to unblock the stalled supplies to Afghanistan is being made to look like a well-considered and a painfully-arrived-at decision from a responsible state that wants to avoid the disastrous course of confrontation with a large group of very important states.

The facts of this particular matter are, however, wholly different. The entire rigmarole of holding marathon meetings and burning the midnight oil to smooth over complex policy creases had nothing to do with the 40-plus ‘important countries of the world’; nor was it a master stroke of fine diplomacy born of genius. While scripted differently, at heart it was an unconditional apology by all Pakistani decision-makers tendered to Washington for their act of closing the Nato supplies six months ago. And this apology had to be made under duress created primarily by a string of miscalculations by the country’s army high command and the political elite.

The more prominent of these miscalculations was the assumption that the hurried act of closing the gates of supplies to Nato and the US forces through Pakistan’s land would, in turn, make the world sit up and take note of the mood at the General Headquarters following Salala.

It was meant to be more than just a profound protest. In fact, Pakistan’s second miscalculation was that it perceived this as an opportunity to re-design its relations with the US in a manner that would secure Islamabad’s core interests in a deal publicly accepted to be between equals and sealed with guarantees of declared respect for Pakistan’s territorial sovereignty. This was an important point to make at the time as Salala came on the heels of the OBL raid. Since the army high command could not retaliate in kind, nor could it sit back and take these repeated hits, it chose the middle way of fighting it out on the table of hard bargains with Washington.

The political elite played along this strategy, but for different reasons. A weak-kneed government had to resort to the crutches of parliament to sustain the policy of cold confrontation with Washington in the hope that the collective will of the people’s representatives would add strength to this posture and help it cut a popular deal with the US. The parliament, never a brooding forum of high-rolling intellectuals, took the mandate with open arms, stretched it according to the aspirations of the people and returned the government a document that would be hard to implement even by the strongest of countries. What was meant to be a source of strength for the government thus became its biggest weakness: the parliament’s wish list could not be turned into a command for the world to obey. Certainly, not by a government that was consumed by its power play with the judiciary.

Thus, hemmed in by gross miscalculations, the Pakistani decision-making machinery went into hasty retreat trampling on itself. The army high command started to blame the politicians for creating a mess in parliament over a fine and delicate manoeuvre to get the best deal with Washington. The civilians in power quietly began to shift responsibility towards the generals for playing populist cards and landing the government in an impossible situation, leading to the blocking of Nato supplies. An empty kitty forced further gloom and doom upon a directionless policy-making apparatus.

The saga that started after the Salala attack is a sad and worrying testimony of how matters of extreme national importance are decided. Knee-jerk reactions have replaced long-term planning in every sphere and no collective wisdom seems to inform — much less set the direction of — the debate about Pakistan’s abiding interests. In the most precarious of times, the country is in the most fickle of hands.

Published in The Express Tribune, May 18th, 2012.

Reader Comments (61)

  • 3rdRockfromtheSun
    May 17, 2012 - 11:26PM

    As they say – Beggars can’t be choosers. Pakistan has no leg to stand on, no bargaining chips in hand, having tried to play on both sides of the fence and with a shambles on the economic front – is only left with the option of swallowing its (false?) pride and acceeding to the demands of US and its NATO allies. And it has no one else to blame but itself – its politicians, its military and its people.

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  • Usman Sherazi
    May 17, 2012 - 11:33PM

    Very well said Talat. You’ve nailed the point. The lack of any vision for the future and the disaterous existing foreign policy is the reason why we are languisihing in this mess in the first place.
    What else can you expect when incompetence reigns supreme regime after regime???

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  • BlackJack
    May 17, 2012 - 11:40PM

    Another well-written article on this topic. It appears that hindsight is a well-developed skill in Pakistan – not surprising for a nation that embellishes its past through creative fiction and has a questionable future. Most of Pakistan has ceased to expect much from their govt or lawmakers, but I find it extremely surprising that the intelligentsia, which is now sagaciously pointing out every single loophole in the thought process that led events to this pretty pass were singing a very different tune in the initial stages of this sorry affair. Anyway, the PPP govt is clearly the fall guy, and given their existing level of unpopularity (with or without the GLOC opening), is a pragmatic decision that doesn’t change anything for anybody. The US shells out approx 10% of their projected spend if the northern supply route was to be used (and gets a free pass through Pakistan with security to boot), and in return agrees to keep Pakistan in the loop through the Chicago invite. The collective productivity of all the great minds leading the nation is truly impressive.

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  • bena
    May 17, 2012 - 11:41PM

    I don’t think all was lost, NATO now knows that a wrong move can have consequences, closing of supplies for six months being the least of them. I think that in the post salala world, NATO will not push Pakistan too much the way it was doing so before salala.

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  • fus
    May 17, 2012 - 11:48PM

    Tax..Tax..Tax…get your finances and revenue streams in order… stand up on your feet and then talk. Until then live like a beggar.

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  • 3rdRockfromtheSun
    May 17, 2012 - 11:52PM

    @bena
    I think the shoe is on the other foot – it is Pakistan that stands on a precipice. As this and some of the other columnists are pointing it, Pakistan does not have many straws left. Another wrong move could have serious consequences for you as the US and its NATO allies have had it with your shenanigans. Your kind of thnking is exactly what has led you to where you stand today and also what the author is warning against.

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  • Kaspar
    May 17, 2012 - 11:55PM

    Why wax eloquent on the deeds of this government of hypocrites and cowards. This is a waste of energy. It was clear from day one that this government is just putting up false shows of ‘democracy’ by involving the parliament in every matter. The real reason for their doing what they are doing is their cowardice, lack of decision power, and preoccupation with ‘making hay while the sun shines.’
    No sane person has any hopes of any good coming from this lot. And don’t worry, most of the money we receive in future from opening up the NATO supply line through our blessed country would go to line the pockets of the rulers and their henchmen. At the end, they will be the richer for it, and the country poorer, and even more exposed to the machinations of the enemies, within and without!!

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  • syeda sidrah
    May 18, 2012 - 12:06AM

    If nato suplly is closed that’s a loss of AMERICA not ours…then why government is desperate to open supply route….com’on its not even our concern…it should be stop for ever ..ALAS our government has taken massive aid from AMERICA so they are unable to say a word because they are treacherous and dumb leaders….!

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  • Imran Con
    May 18, 2012 - 12:56AM

    @bena:
    No. Consequences of actions is common sense. Nothing new was learned.

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  • sandip
    May 18, 2012 - 1:15AM

    @bena: Really? You think so? The truth is that the generals in GHQ will not even in their dreams think of provoking US again. They had only one trump card and they used it with no gains whatsoever. Just imagine. The mighty PA has been turned into a bunch of security guards for NATO containers. And all this for what? Just for a few hundred million dollars more to buys toys for the boys? I hope someone somewhere is pondering as to where they have taken the nation to.

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  • sidjeen
    May 18, 2012 - 1:22AM

    thirty years of interfering in the affairs of Afghanistan has brought only doom and gloom for our country i wonder if any one will just put his hands up and say enough is enough lets not interfere in the affairs of Afghanistan for may be the next three years and see what happens i believe the result will be a better Pakistan and a better Afghanistan isn’t that a good thing?

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  • Pro Bono Publico
    May 18, 2012 - 1:42AM

    @Usman Sherazi:
    What else anyone can expect from an NRO-foisted junta? The Zardari junta are only making the best if it.

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  • DB
    May 18, 2012 - 2:59AM

    Sorry to say, but Talat is now just justifying the soon to be re-opened NATO supply line.

    Closing it was the right thing to do after Salala.

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  • Jat
    May 18, 2012 - 3:13AM

    Talat very well written. These so called generals are hiding behind politicians and firing duds from their shoulders. And the politicians are too corrupt; and as a result too weak to say “No”.

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  • Mirza
    May 18, 2012 - 3:18AM

    We should have apologized the world for trying to blackmail and extort money out of the death of two dozen soldiers. Taliban kill dozens of Pakistanis every other day but we do not go ballistic on that ever. How much blood money do they give to the families of poor victims?

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  • Truthbetold
    May 18, 2012 - 3:47AM

    @syeda sidrah:

    Your post is strange!

    First you ask:

    “If nato suplly is closed that’s a loss of AMERICA not ours…then why government is desperate to open supply route….com’on its not even our concern…it should be stop for ever” ..

    Right in the next sentence you say:

    “ALAS our government has taken massive aid from AMERICA so they are unable to say a word because they are treacherous and dumb leaders….!”

    You see, you answered your own question! One way of putting your own answer is “beggars can’t be choosy and have no power!

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  • syed hussain
    May 18, 2012 - 4:06AM

    Nothing new happened,not a startling news,this is destiny of beggars and slaves,like us. Obey orders of your master or get ready to be punished. But Pity this nation who could not enjoy the pleasure of blockading the supplies for a long time,it seemed to be only pleasure of this despondent nation. The only source to satisfy the so called Ghairat of this nation seems to be going away, alas. After a deliberate affront, no formal apology but threats and pressure from US to open the supply line. i think, US forgot, Pakistan is a Ghairatmand Country, how can we open supply line without Dollars. Dollars are important than apology, apology that is nothing but few fruitless words for this nation. Thanks God, US realized and now he is ready to pay our price, price for the martyrs of Salala, price for more than 40,000 casualties in Pakistan and price to keep our lips sealed, don’t open your lips for an apology.

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  • kaalchakra
    May 18, 2012 - 4:31AM

    sijdeen

    Pakistan does not interfere in the affairs of Afghanistan. Pakistan is Afghanistan’s brotherly nation. Pakistan has certain rights over Afghanistan. Exercising those rights is not the same thing as interfering.

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  • gp65
    May 18, 2012 - 4:50AM

    Pakistan’s foreign and security policy formulation takes into account its own strength and the opponent’s weakness. It does not consider either its own weaknesses or the opponents strength. Salala is definitely not the first time. 1965 and Kargill are other examples of the same thought process.

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  • Adeel759
    May 18, 2012 - 6:02AM

    @Author. “DCC stoped short of declaring holiday” that’s a good one. This needs to be clearly understood, “Nato Supply was blocked by GHQ and is being allowed by GHQ”. So please stop bashing Civilians, they towed the GHQ line to hype the crisis as they always do. GHQ is the Janam Bhumi of Pakistan’s all ills and disastors.Recommend

  • May 18, 2012 - 6:50AM

    One of the biggest challenges of waging war anywhere is supply logistics to deployed troops. The supply challenge becomes even more formidable when the war theater is a landlocked country located thousands of miles away and involves transit through one or more other countries and international border crossings. The United States military has been facing such a challenge since it deployed in Afghanistan in 2001, and it’s become only more difficult since the Obama troop surge in 2009 and worsening ties with Pakistan.

    The apology would have been swift if this was not an election year in the US, but politics have trumped policy yet again. The end game for the US in the region is likely to become much tougher without bringing Pakistanis on board.

    http://www.riazhaq.com/2011/12/us-military-supply-logistics-in.html

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  • naive
    May 18, 2012 - 8:54AM

    @kaalchakra

    Your messages are often confusing. It is difficult to make out whether you are sarcastic or just being naive.

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  • naive
    May 18, 2012 - 8:57AM

    I don’t know why people are being critical of Pakistan on this issue. Ultimately Pakistan has got a good deal. They are getting 365 million more/year at the cost of 2 dozen soldiers which is not bad whichever way you look at it.

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  • Feroz
    May 18, 2012 - 9:11AM

    A compulsive gambler will bet his house for the last throw of dice. The country has tried to capitalize on fear by issuing threats and sometimes adding more fuel to the fire. If you do not support us the terrorists will take over the country. Now the World has sadly realized the emptiness of the threat and that the danger comes from the mindset of the interlocutors, not solely the state sponsored terrorists. Only a genius can get away with the double speak of fanning extremism and asking for aid to fight it – unfortunately the country has made a hash of that job and lost the last shred of sympathy.

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  • atherzaidi
    May 18, 2012 - 9:26AM

    Talat’s presentation needs serious consideration by all the stake-holders in Pakistan’s polity. There is something basically wrong with our thinking process that needs to be attended.

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  • Surya
    May 18, 2012 - 9:47AM

    @kaalchakra:
    Based on your weird theory, US has a “lot more rights” on Pakistan..So don’t when US is “exercising” their rights over you..Lol..

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  • Kini
    May 18, 2012 - 10:04AM

    Why do you call it the Pakistani ‘Decision Making Machinery’? Who are you trying to fool?

    We all know who makes the decisions here. And its not the civilians.

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  • mani
    May 18, 2012 - 10:09AM

    @3rdRockfromtheSun:
    exactly, if we were that strong, none of this crap would’ve happened. we are run by the weak and pathetic

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  • May 18, 2012 - 10:34AM

    @bena: Hanging on the wild wishes????

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  • May 18, 2012 - 10:40AM

    @kaalchakra: How about we saying “India does not interfere in the affairs of Pakistan. Pakistan is India’s brotherly nation. India has certain rights over Pakistan. Exercising those rights is not the same thing as interfering.”

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  • May 18, 2012 - 10:51AM

    There is only one thing emphatically clear to me that the newspapers like TRIBUNE, DAWN their editorial boards and well known writers on the “OPINION” column were right from the beginning. They have been openly writing throughout that all the show by Tehrik e Insaf, Defae Pakistan and Right wing is waste of time. The steps and stance taken by them was not based on cool reason but no one was in mood to listen. Thank God the reason has prevailed.

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  • Lala Gee
    May 18, 2012 - 10:53AM

    I mostly agree with Talat’s narrative and I am myself a critic of the strategy employed post Slala incident, but at the same time I disagree that the whole exercise went in vain. It definitely had some indirect benefits and, at minimum, we shown our will to resist and put a bit of stop to any such future incidents, at least for the six months.

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  • imran
    May 18, 2012 - 10:57AM

    I don’t know why these columnist always ready to bash government whatever decision made by her. After the Salala incident the blockade of supply route was right decision. If government did not took decision, that can be resulted in deepen the internal rift criticism on armed forces and other lethal consequences. What was wrong that time to invoke public sentiment irrationally by ghairatmand brigade including this writer. Government took decision some wrong some rights but it should not connected with apologize and national prestige. One more thing, every Pakistani must understand that “prestige’ is not a product of a weak state like Pakistan. unfortunately Pakistan is a country which always slap others’ faces but always expect from other that they believe on our nationalist fantasy.

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  • Lala Gee
    May 18, 2012 - 10:57AM

    @Mirza:

    “We should have apologized the world for trying to blackmail and extort money out of the death of two dozen soldiers.”

    You can have the honor and do it on your countries behalf. But wait, which country? Pakistan or USA?

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  • May 18, 2012 - 11:43AM

    lol. So true.

    But, in hindsight its all easy to analyze, but people like Kamran Shafi and Irfan Hussain of Dawn have said giving this decision to parliament was a bad idea.

    Their articles made so much sense! I can’t believe they were the only people who saw through the illusion Pakistan had built it up for itself, at least of the many opinions I had read at that time.

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  • kaalchakra
    May 18, 2012 - 11:46AM

    Vinod, Surya, other Indians poking their noses into Afghanistan

    Afghanistan is an Islamic nation. Pakistan is the Islamic core. Merely Pushtoons live in Afghanistan. In Pakistan live Pushtoons who not only are Pushtoons racially but who also are guided by an Islamic vision. Do you now see how the Islamic core of Pakistan has natural, brotherly rights over the land of Afghanistan?

    On the other hand, India has no business having any relations with Afghanistani government.

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  • yousaf
    May 18, 2012 - 11:59AM

    Have to log off,light is about to go off.route????????????

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  • sidjeen
    May 18, 2012 - 12:42PM

    @ VINOD: Thank God the reason has prevailed.

    Sorry brother reason has actually not prevailed its just that every other option is lost. the international community called our bluff and found out we don’t have any trump cards up our sleeves.

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  • ramanan
    May 18, 2012 - 12:45PM

    Guys/Gals

    Where is Imran Tsunami khan these days ? His silence is deafening.

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  • sidjeen
    May 18, 2012 - 12:47PM

    @ kaalchakra don’t know what you are trying to say but if you are referring to the Durand line agreement and stuff like that then its actually the other way round i.e Afghanistan having rights over parts of Pakistan. i think we should all live in this region peacefully and refrain from claiming rights over each other. its quite a Pandora’s box.

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  • let there be peace
    May 18, 2012 - 12:54PM

    @Riaz Haq:
    Wow now you have become military expert too. You are genius sir.

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  • evil
    May 18, 2012 - 1:38PM

    lol , brotherly what?!
    first try 2 satisfy the basic needs of ur own citizens… stand on one’s own feet and then exercise!! :/

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  • Nand
    May 18, 2012 - 4:29PM

    @kaalchakra: ‘Pakistan has certain rights over Afghanistan. Exercising those rights is not the same thing as interfering’.
    Can you please inform us illiterate what these ‘rights’ are.

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  • Mad-Paki
    May 18, 2012 - 4:38PM

    If blocking the routes was wrong then this volte face is even worse.

    Of course there were downsides, in blocking the supplies, but this is how you go about your business in this world driven by interests.

    In this high stake poker game only countries with strong nerves always win. In contrast, our leadership has shown that it cannot stand up for vital national interests and it will buckle under pressure.

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  • Lala Gee
    May 18, 2012 - 5:10PM

    @3rdRockfromtheSun:

    “I think the shoe is on the other foot – it is Pakistan that stands on a precipice. As this and some of the other columnists are pointing it, Pakistan does not have many straws left. Another wrong move could have serious consequences for you….”

    @sandip:

    “The truth is that the generals in GHQ will not even in their dreams think of provoking US again. They had only one trump card and they used it with no gains whatsoever.”

    @sidjeen:

    “Sorry brother reason has actually not prevailed its just that every other option is lost. the international community called our bluff and found out we don’t have any trump cards up our sleeves.”

    Many columnists and commentators are reiterating that Pakistan has already played her trump card, i.e. blocking the GLOC, but I would humbly disagree with their assessment. Pakistan still has couple of cards left but that would take the hostility into higher levels and it is wise to retreat as a strategic move. In my opinion, Pakistan herself is the trump card of USA in this region, when seen in the perspective of India, Iran and gulf, and Afghanistan and Central Asia; and also when an investment of hundreds of billions of dollars (money spent on war) is considered in AfPak; USA equally stands on the verge of losing her trump card.

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  • Nand
    May 18, 2012 - 6:05PM

    @Lala Gee:
    If your assessment was right, GHQ would not have opened this NATO route. If you are talking of the strategic asset as your another trump card you are mistaken. Just try and see the disastrous result for Pakistan. For God sake, come down from your high horse.

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  • Lala Gee
    May 18, 2012 - 6:17PM

    @BlackJack:

    “The collective productivity of all the great minds leading the nation is truly impressive.”

    I totally agree with you what you said in the whole comment, but particularly the above quoted para is the essence. Ironically, if you think deeply and honestly, this may equally apply to your own nation as well with some give or take.

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  • May 18, 2012 - 6:54PM

    strong text@kaalchakra: You have said “……….. Pakistan is the Islamic core. ………. In Pakistan live Pushtoons who not only are Pushtoons racially but who also are guided by an Islamic vision. Do you now see how the Islamic core of Pakistan has natural, brotherly rights over the land of Afghanistan?”
    Dear Sir you have no logic or facts but rehotric only. Sir, How is Pakistan “Isamic core” What about Saudi, Iran, Iraq etc.? What is Islamic vision? You mean all Islamic countries have “natural, brotherly rights over the land of Afghanistan or land of each other?’ How about the brotherly rights of people of Afghanistan and Bilochistan over the land of Pakistan ? How about brotherly Islamic rights of billions of Muslims of India over land of Pakistan? Just talking loudly about Islam, Ummah and so on does not give Pakistan any rights over the land of another soverign Ilslamic state. I wonder if Arabs or Pushtoon ever think that people of Pakistan are same race. Please think over.

    .

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  • usmanx
    May 18, 2012 - 7:19PM

    oye Vindod, pushtuns ARE pakistanis.

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  • 3rdRockfromtheSun
    May 18, 2012 - 7:53PM

    @LalaGee
    “Pakistan still has couple of cards left but that would take the hostility into higher levels…” A trump card you can never play isn’t really a trump card at all, is it? And as regards “Pakistan herself is the trump card of USA in this region…”, these are the delusions of grandeur that have landed your country in this mess to begin with.
    So either you guys wake up and smell the coffee, or we’ll just enjoy the show, someone pass the popcorn!

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  • Tch tch
    May 18, 2012 - 8:42PM

    The GHQ stands exposed…No blaming Zardari and the “Bloody civilians” this time….

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  • anonymus
    May 18, 2012 - 8:58PM

    @naive:
    I agree with you. but then I have to say he is saying what exactly is the thinking of Post Zia educated middle class, with skin deep knowledge, with unidirectional approach to Islam, Pakistan, minorities, other nationalities in Pakistan and India. you will meet many good people with same thoughts.
    As some one has said…..good and well intending people do bad things in the name of religion( I must aid in the name of patriotism also)
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  • Lala Gee
    May 18, 2012 - 9:23PM

    @3rdRockfromtheSun:

    “And as regards “Pakistan herself is the trump card of USA in this region…”, these are the delusions of grandeur that have landed your country in this mess to begin with.”

    I understand it hurts the egos of our Indian brothers, but it is a brutal fact. Had it not been Pakistan, India might not have been realigned with USA – and if you read the comments of Indians one might take them as American spokespersons. And, although I do not like it, but USA has successfully used Pakistan to control India and vice versa. It is up to the leadership and people of both the countries to understand and realize the force behind that is not letting the friendly relations be established between the two neighbors which could have been beneficial for the people of both the countries having so much in common.

    Similarly, USA cannot afford to have another hostile country after Iran in the region. It definitely does not suit her plans in the gulf and Central Asia.

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  • Arjun
    May 18, 2012 - 10:45PM

    it’s become only more difficult since the Obama troop surge in 2009 and worsening ties with Pakistan.

    Really? Then why did Pakistan have to open the routes without an apology that it said it MUST have?

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  • Parvez
    May 19, 2012 - 12:18AM

    Nicely worded.
    What has now been absolutely established is that we are being managed by a bunch of semi-competent people. In local matters the public are aware of this and in international matters the outsiders are aware of this.
    These semi-competent people are unable to assess their own failings because they have built a system that perpetuates a mediocre mind set with low moral values and one that reinforces this cycle.

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  • Ajay
    May 19, 2012 - 12:46AM

    @bena: You are wrong. There is no respect or regard for Pakistan given its hiding of OBL and attendant lies all through, support for Taliban and other anti US elements, horrible treatment of minorities and involvement in most terror strikes around the world. US knows how to use a crooked finger to take the ghee out of the bottle. It will punish Pakistan suitably at the right time. It has accomplished its objectives meanwhile. Pakistan can attend Chicago but it is eventually going to be declared a pariah state by world community whereby it will become completely irrelevant in anything outside Pakistan.

    The trouble with Pakistani non-strategists is that they can’t think multi dimensionally. They can just think about what they can do to others not what others can do to them or the constraints they themselves are surrounded with which preclude such behavior.Basically they come across as arrogant know-nothing fools.

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  • from india
    May 19, 2012 - 8:01AM

    @BlackJack:

    I think you mentioned in one of your comment a while ago that PAK will be forced to apologize for closing the NATO supply route and exactly the same thing happened.

    Your comments (along with Mirza, ayesha_khan, gp65, faraz, John B, and few others) are all always a pleasure to read.

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  • A Peshawary
    May 19, 2012 - 2:14PM

    Who says Pakistanis donot understand the fine points of foreign policy or internaitonal relation. Mr. Talat and Najam Shethi are the example from the lot who have complete grip on what they write or say. So are our politicians and civil servants, these were the people who gave us 1973 consitution and Shimala Agreement and now the 17th and 18th Amendment. The mess created by military dictators takes time to be cleared. The empty space in internaitonal relations created by rule of military regime and filled in by US, NATO and India will take a lot of effort and time to regain the lost space and show some relavance and success.

    A Peshawary

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  • A Peshawary
    May 19, 2012 - 3:58PM

    @VINOD:
    Yes Sir, I am Pushtoon, Pakistani and Muslim! I 100% agree to you, no one has right to capture others land individually or collectively a nation.

    India also dont’ have the right to hold on the land sold by Raja of Kashmir against the will of people and UN Resolution or Siachin. Israel holding on the Land of other countries also not legitimate. It is reiterated that the apporoach and comments of emphasized textkaalchakara regarding having rights to other’s land are not commended.

    A Peshawary

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  • S.Murthy
    Jun 10, 2012 - 2:06PM

    Pakistan will always be running with the hare and hunting with the hound. The govt, whichever control it is supposed to be under, military or civilian, claims to fight terrorism, swears it never hid Osama Bin Laden and still punishes a doctor for betraying to the US OBL’s hideout. The world does not know, which one is a real criminal act, hiding OBL or betraying the hideout. And the country expects every other nation to trust it and sympathize with it. No way!

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  • Tahir Raza
    Jul 1, 2012 - 4:27AM

    I am in USA on Visit, and robbed in Atlanta, GA on Main Road(Day time,My I Pad and all docs snatched)….its an example of law and order in American and Slam for those who dreaming to be in USA……i even note the car number and reported to police immediately but still no progress,
    I can provide more detail,

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