Books, not guns in G-B: NGO continues to enhance educational standards

Published: June 29, 2015
Email
STOCK IMAGE

STOCK IMAGE

GILGIT: 

Much like in the rest of the country, NGOs in Gilgit-Baltistan have been working hard to ensure every child has access to quality education.

Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) is one such organisation which has recently completed a five-year project in the region called Education Development and Improvement Programme (EDIP).

For nearly three decades, the NGO has worked towards improving education standards in the region to help people stand on their own feet.

“The project has enhanced access to quality education,” an AKDN official told The Express Tribune on Sunday. “The number of girls who go to school has increased because of this initiative.”

On the cards

Earlier, on Saturday, a seminar was held to mark the successful implementation of the project. During the session, programme partners shared details about EDIP and their work in G-B.

G-B Education Secretary Sanaullah, who was also in attendance, lauded EDIP’s strategy to reduce illiteracy in areas where it remains rampant.

“One of EDIP’s goals is to help the education department develop an implementation strategy,” the secretary said. “Under this strategy, which has been termed G-B Education Strategy (G-BES), the district will see an improvement in educational services. Furthermore, public sector initiatives with private sector will be merged,” he added.

Blessing in disguise

EDIP was implemented in close collaboration between the federal government and the education department in G-B. It has been established in Gilgit, Astore, Ghanche, Skardu, Hunza-Nagar, Diamer, and Ghizer.

According to an insider, the project has strengthened the school infrastructure and provided security for children and teachers.

“The programme has generated awareness about education and built avenues to help children suffering from disabilities become contributing members of society,” he added.

Published in The Express Tribune, June 29th, 2015.

 

Facebook Conversations

More in Gilgit Baltistan