VIDEO: Obama quotes Shah Rukh Khan in DDLJ during address in India

'Senorita, bade bade desho mein… you know what I mean,' the US president said


Web Desk January 27, 2015
US President Barack Obama gestures after speaking on US - India relations during a townhall event at Siri Fort Auditorium in New Delhi on January 27, 2015. PHOTO: AFP

US President Barack Obama gave everyone a pleasant and entertaining surprise when he quoted a dialogue from one of bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Khan’s movies, Indian Express reported.

The US premier was on a two-day visit to India with his wife Michelle Obama. The line he quoted in an endearing manner was from Bollywood blockbuster Dilwale Dulahinya Le Jayenge.

“Senorita, bade bade deshon mein… you what I mean,” Obama said, with a sheepish smile on his face, attempting to speak Hindi.

Watch a clip of Obama’s address at a townhall in New Delhi:



“Last [time] here, we celebrated festival of lights in Mumbai. We danced with some children. Unfortunately, we were not able to schedule any dancing in this visit. Senorita, bade bade desho mein… you know what I mean,” he said.

Shortly after his winning attempt at speaking Hindi and quoting Bollywood, it was no surprise that it caused a Twitter frenzy.

Moreover, the US president also used actor Shah Rukh Khan and Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarti as examples of courage and humanitarian values, adding that these two traits unify India and the US.

COMMENTS (14)

oBSERVER | 6 years ago | Reply

@Sid: Read my reply to Mega and continue to live with your myth.

oBSERVER | 6 years ago | Reply

@Mega: There is no language called Hindi. Like your society it is another denial of facts and history. You speak Urdu, I repeat Urdu and just by adding few Sanskrit words and phrases you don't create a new language. I feel sorry for you people with no history but only Mythology which is also Called Myth. Do read Mr Mohan Lal Gandhi and you will be wiser.

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