Pakistan seeks extradition of TTP supremo Mullah Fazlullah from Afghanistan

Request for the extradition of Pakistan’s most wanted man was made by Mahmood Khan Achakzai.


Kamran Yousaf June 19, 2014
TTP leader Mullah Fazlullah along with a host of TTP commanders are believed to be hiding in Nooristan and Kunar regions of Afghanistan. PHOTO: FILE

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan has sought extradition of Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) chief Mullah Fazlullah from Afghanistan and dismantlement of the militant outfit’s longstanding hideouts in Kunar and Nooristan provinces, The Express Tribune has learnt.

The request for the extradition of Pakistan’s most wanted man was made by Mahmood Khan Achakzai on behalf of the Prime Minister in a meeting with Afghan President Hamid Karzai in Kabul on Wednesday, said a well-informed government official in Islamabad.

Meanwhile, the foreign office confirmed that Achakzai visited Afghanistan as a special envoy of the Prime Minister to seek Kabul’s cooperation in eliminating terrorism. He was also accompanied by foreign secretary Aizaz Ahmed Chaudhry.

When contacted, Achakzai refused to comment on the visit.

But a government official familiar with the development told The Express Tribune that Pakistan had requested Karzai Administration to stop supporting the TTP and seek extradition of its fugitive chief, who is believed to be hiding in Afghanistan.

The official, who asked to remain anonymous, said Pakistan had compelling evidence suggesting that Mullah Fazlullah and other TTP commanders were enjoying ‘patronage’ of Afghanistan’s intelligence agency.

“Afghanistan’s support is very crucial for the success of operation in North Waziristan. They need to dismantle TTP’s sanctuaries on their soil. They must stop supporting Fazlullah,” said a security official.

During the weekly briefing at the Foreign office on Thursday, spokesperson Tasnim Aslam told reporters that Afghan authorities had assured their cooperation to Pakistan.

Karzai calls Nawaz

Following Achakzai’s visit to Kabul, Afghan President Hamid Karzai telephoned Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and discussed the anti-terror cooperation between the two countries.

“The Pakistani Prime Minister Mian Nawaz Sharif agreed with all parts of an Afghan that both countries should jointly fight with all terrorists. Safe havens of terrorists should be dismantled and there should be a road-map to coordinate the joint struggle,” a statement from Karzai’s office said.

It was decided that an Afghan delegation would also soon visit Islamabad to carry a special letter from President Karzai that would list some proposals and would also discuss future plans with Pakistani side.

President Karzai also underscored the need to coordinate with the anti-terror war strategy with all key regional players, the statement said, adding: “the Afghan President also called for extra care to avoid civilian casualties during the war on terror.

However, it was not clear whether the Karzai administration was willing to extradite Mullah Fazlullah and destroy TTP hideouts on the Afghan side.

Afghan intelligence agency is believed to be providing refugee to TTP in an effort to use them as a bargaining chip with Pakistan over the issue of Afghan Taliban as well as Haqqani network, which allegedly has safe heavens in Waziristan.

COMMENTS (30)

Rex Minor | 7 years ago | Reply

The Sharifs are seeking confrontation with Afghanistan now by demanding the fugitives who were identified as the causual factor to start military carnage in KPK and displcing the Pakhtuns of the tribal region who were forced out of their villages because of areal bombardment. And now they say the fugitives with their alleged camps have crossed over to Afghanistan.

Rex Minor

narinder singh | 7 years ago | Reply

@junaid: why u against narendar modi only one hope for peace in this region narender modi and nawaz sharif

VIEW MORE COMMENTS
Replying to X

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.

For more information, please see our Comments FAQ

E-Publications

Most Read