India alleges Pakistan involved in North Korea nuclear tests: Reports

Unsubstantiated allegations raised by Indian media.


Mehroz Siraj February 13, 2013
PHOTO: REUTERS

Indian government officials have leveled unsubstantiated allegations  about Pakistan's involvement in North Korea's recent nuclear tests, reports the Times of India.

On February 12 North Korea carried out its latest nuclear test involving a nuclear warhead of six to seven kilotons, drawing sharp international condemnation.

The Times of India quoted an unnamed Indian government official as saying, "when you talk about any nuclear test conducted by North Korea, the role of Pakistan can never be far behind.''

Indian authorities were reported by the Times of India as saying that if these tests were done using enriched uranium, then it was an indication that pointed towards Pakistani involvement.

The paper reported allegations of Indian officials who claimed that just when these tests took place, in Geneva, Pakistan was blocking further negotiations on the Fissile Material Cut off Treaty (FMCT) at the global Conference on Disarmament that is being organized by the United Nations.

Echoing a similar view, American scientist and weapons expert Siegfried S Hecker was reported by the New York Times as alleging that North Korea might have obtained its nuclear knowledge and blue prints from Pakistani scientist Dr Abdul Qadeer Khan.

Previously, in his December 2008 book, Goodbye Shahzadi, Indian journalist Shyam Bhatia claimed that former prime minister Benazir Bhutto once told him, about the alleged exchange of nuclear knowledge and missile designs between Pakistan and North Korea, however it must be noted that none of Bhatia's allegations have ever been proven.

COMMENTS (72)

James | 8 years ago | Reply

@Rex Minor: The North Koreans still do not have a missile which is capable of reaching US

ram | 8 years ago | Reply

India enemity with Muslims is established.

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