Indemnity-granting presidential ordinance challenged in SC

Petitioners claim ordinance undermines parliament's legislative authority and judiciary’s constitutional rights.


Web Desk June 26, 2012

ISLAMABAD: The supposedly unchallengeable presidential ordinance issued to grant indemnity to all actions taken by former prime minister Yousaf Raza Gilani post-April 26 has been challenged in the Supreme Court, Express News reported on Tuesday.

Petitoners Shahid and Saeed, who filed the petition today in the Supreme Court, stated that the court had not yet given “consequences” of Gilani’s post-disqualification actions, therefore President Asif Ali Zardari had granted "unconstitutional" indemnity to the former prime minister.

The petitioners also claim that the presidential ordinance undermines the parliament’s legislative authority and the judiciary’s constitutional rights.

Earlier, Zardari had issued an ordinance providing legal cover to all the actions taken by Gilani between his conviction by the Supreme Court (SC) on April 26 and his actual removal on June 19.

The two-page ordinance promulgated on Sunday is intended to validate all decisions, appointments and international commitments made by Gilani since the day he was convicted for contempt. The draft of the presidential order said it could not be challenged legally, including through a petition in the SC.

The order stated that “no suit, prosecution or any other legal proceedings including a petition shall lie in any court or forum including the Supreme Court” against any order made or functions performed by the former premier.

COMMENTS (2)

Baghi | 9 years ago | Reply

Detailed decison of SC will give coverage to all issues. There was no need for Ordinance or now challenging it in the court. Actually every one seems to fond of jumping ahead. Media also seeks thrilling news so is the headline in ET too.

A J Khan | 9 years ago | Reply

It is the best time for such acts when PML N can customise the Laws through judiciary.

Replying to X

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.

For more information, please see our Comments FAQ

E-Publications

Most Read