Speaker's ruling: CJ warns AG to be wary of his statements

AG says use of poetry in PM contem­pt case verdic­t was denigr­ating; hearin­g adrjou­ned till June 19.


Web Desk June 18, 2012

ISLAMABAD: Chief Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry warned Attorney General Irfan Qadir to be wary of his statements as he became critical of the judges during the hearing of the petitions filed against the speaker’s ruling in the prime minister contempt case on Monday, Express News reported.

The hearing has been adjourned till Tuesday, June 19.

As the attorney general came on the rostrum to present his arguments, he criticised the lawyers and said that the use of poetry in the verdict of the contempt case against Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani was denigrating.

He also said that the court was not “listening to his arguments”.

“The court can listen to the petitioners but does not give us the chance to say something.”

Irked by what he said, the chief justice warned the attorney general and told him to not give such a statement again. He also said that old matters should not be brought up in the court again.

The chief justice said that the PM contempt case had concluded and that the AG should remain relevant in his arguments.

AG Qadir asked the court to guide him as to what he should state in the court and he would not give any further arguments if the court had wanted so.

Justice Jawad S Khwaja observed that his arguments were being noted.

Earlier, the chief justice had said that a “convicted person is representing a population of 180 million people”.

The hearing was underway by a three-member bench of the Supreme Court including Chief Justice Chaudhry, Justice Khwaja and Justice Khilji Arif.

The chief justice had said, “A prime minister does not only represent a party, but is also a country’s representative.”

Gilani’s counsel, Aitzaz Ahsan, had presented his arguments before the judicial bench.

The chief justice had said that the steps taken by Speaker National Assembly Dr Fehmida Mirza regarding the function of the parliament can be reviewed.

Attorney General Qadir had submitted a reply before the judicial bench on behalf of Dr Mirza.

During his arguments, Ahsan had declared that the petitions could not be heard as the speaker had already given her statement on the issue.

The chief justice had said that the petitions maintained that Gilani was disqualified after the Supreme Court’s verdict in a contempt case against him was announced.

Ahsan had argued that the prime minister did not receive a sentence which disqualified him.

The Supreme Court had adjourned all other cases scheduled for today as it aimed to resolve this case as soon as possible.

In the previous hearing, Ahsan had proposed the formation of a larger bench, saying that the case was of high priority.

While presenting his case, Aitzaz had said that the Speaker’s office was not a ‘post office’, adding that she, too, has the right to use her own brain.

The petitions, including those filed by Pakistan Muslim League – Nawaz (PML-N) and Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf (PTI), had challenged the speaker’s ruling and demanded prime minister’s disqualification after he was convicted of contempt by the apex court.

COMMENTS (48)

Sadia | 9 years ago | Reply

Time for independent elections. Lets see how these PPP "saints" perform in free and fair elections.

Pakistani | 9 years ago | Reply

Once the dust settles and the euphoria dies down we'll know that we have created another Frankenstein. NO ONE including the judges can exceed the law. The current judiciary is creating its own laws. They are ridiculing the parliament and the choice of the people. They keep telling the nation that you are stupid and we are genius. If the CJ has powers under the constitution so does other institutions of the system such as the president, PM and the speaker. The parliament that makes the law is far superior to the judiciary which can only interpret the law. In this case the judiciary has gone beyond the constitution. Its a very sad decision

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