Soldier who massacred 16 Afghans, identified as Sgt Robert Bales

US troop shifted to base in Kansas to face punitive action as per US Army rules.


Reuters March 16, 2012

WASHINGTON: The soldier implicated in the massacre of 16 villagers in Afghanistan - an incident that sent American-Afghan relations into a tailspin – has been identified as US Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales, a US official said on Friday.

The official declined to provide additional details about Bales, who is suspected of walking off his base in southern Afghanistan on Sunday and gunning down 16 villagers.

Earlier, the soldier's attorney said the staff sergeant was scheduled to arrive on Friday at the Fort Leavenworth army base in Kansas, where he will be held in maximum security. Fort Leavenworth has the US Defense Department's only maximum-security facility.

The 38-year-old soldier, whose military unit is based south of Tacoma, Washington, had been held in Kuwait after he was flown out of Afghanistan on Wednesday.

Bales has not yet been charged in the incident.

"I would assume he'll be charged pretty fast," said Jeffrey Lustick, a defense attorney and former Air Force military prosecutor and defense attorney in Bellingham, Washington.

The soldier is expected to face justice under US military rules, but it is not clear where any trial would take place.

Seattle attorney John Henry Browne told Reuters that post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, would likely be part of the defense of the four-tour veteran.

"It is commonly used in military defense," he said, calling it a mitigating factor. Browne has said the soldier was unhappy about returning to combat after being wounded twice in Iraq.

He added on Friday that the man had witnessed a serious injury to a comrade the day before the massacre in the southern province of Kandahar on Sunday.

"One leg was blown off," Browne said, and the sergeant was nearby. Browne or a colleague from the defense team plan to meet the sergeant next week, he said.

It is believed that the soldier walked off the Belambai base in the middle of the night last Sunday and began shooting Afghan villagers in two nearby villages, according to a congressional source.

The shooting of villagers has harmed relations between Afghanistan and the United States. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has accused the Pentagon of failing to fully cooperate with an investigation into the killings.

Browne told CNN that he had spoken with his client earlier in the morning, and in the short conversation the soldier "sounded distant and kind of like a deer in the headlights, but okay."

At a news conference on Thursday, Browne described his client as "an exemplary soldier" who was upset at having to do a fourth tour of duty in a war zone and was likely suffering from stress after seeing colleagues wounded.

An unnamed US official had told The New York Times that the killings were a result of "a combination of stress, alcohol and domestic issues — he just snapped."

But Browne said on CNN that marital problems were "totally bogus." He said his client has a "very strong marriage and frankly we're all taking offense at that."

Karzai met with village elders and families of victims of the shootings on Friday and appeared to back their belief that a single gunman could not have killed so many people and in different places some distance apart.

On Thursday Karzai called for NATO troops to leave Afghan villages and confine themselves to major bases, underscoring fury over the massacre and clouding US plans to withdraw its troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014.

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COMMENTS (18)

anwar | 9 years ago | Reply

Words of R. Fisk

I'm getting a bit tired of the "deranged" soldier story. It was predictable, of course. The 38-year-old staff sergeant who massacred 16 Afghan civilians, including nine children, near Kandahar this week had no sooner returned to base than the defence experts and the think-tank boys and girls announced that he was "deranged". Not an evil, wicked, mindless terrorist – which he would be, of course, if he had been an Afghan, especially a Taliban – but merely a guy who went crazy. This was the same nonsense used to describe the murderous US soldiers who ran amok in the Iraqi town of Haditha. It was the same word used about Israeli soldier Baruch Goldstein who massacred 25 Palestinians in Hebron – something I pointed out in this paper only hours before the staff sergeant became suddenly "deranged" in Kandahar province.

Larry Caudill | 9 years ago | Reply

This soldier has been asked to go way above and beyond anything we can imagine in the service to his country. He has been asked to leave a wife, two young children and all his friends and family not once, not twice, but four times. We don''t condone his actions, but pray for mercy for a man who has been stretched beyond endurance. The military made him the way he became, so the military should take responsibility and give him the resources he needs to recover instead of bowing to the wishes of the Afghan people. Please don't harm this man. He has served our country when so many of us won't.

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