Feast festivity: Eid draws Lahoris outdoors

Parks, historical sites popular choices for celebrating families.


Ali Usman/karamat Bhatty September 02, 2011

LAHORE:


The number of visitors to city’s parks and other recreational areas soared on Wednesday and Thursday as large crowds headed out on the occasion of Eid.


Jallo Park, Race Course Park, Ghulshan-i-Iqbal, Model Town Park and Lawrence Gardens witnessed a large number of visitors during the three holidays of Eid.

Among historical sites, Minar-i-Pakistan, Lahore Fort, Jahangir’s tomb, Kamran’s Baradari, Shalamar Gardens and Lahore Museum were the most visited places.

The number of people visiting River Ravi for boating, however, remained low this year. The contractor held low level of water in the river responsible for the low turn out.

Besides recreational places, people thronged graveyards in large numbers on Eid to offer prayers for their deceased relatives.

Traffic on city roads remained calm for the most part and no major jams were witnessed. Several commuters The Express Tribune talked to believed that this was a result of a large number of people departing for other cities and villages ahead of Eid rather than any effort on the part of the police.

(Read: Eid festivities - Tarot, food and shoes; something for everyone)

Some complained that said they had to choose between rickshaws and Qing Qis because bus and mini-bus service remained suspended on most routes. They also complained about the unusually high fares charged.

Earlier, sweets shops had remained open till late in the night ahead of the Eid. Hundreds of thousands of kilogrammes of sweets were sold by these shops. Most shopkeepers said sales on Eidul Fitr were more than on any other occasion throughout the year. Some, however, suggested that sales were slower than last year.

Abdul Razzaq, 37, who owns a shop near Data Darbar said he had sold much more last year compared to what he had sold this Eid. “It appears people no longer have the same purchasing power,” he said.

Security arrangements

As many as 13,000 policemen performed security duties in the city on Eid. In a statement issued on Friday, DIG Ghulam Mohamad Doger said he had personally monitored security arrangements at major mosques and other places where Eid prayers were organised.  He said city police was on high alert.

Excesses

At least 50 people were brought to emergency wards of various public hospitals in the city following excessive consumption of alcohol on Chaand Raat and Eid.

(Read: Is bad parenting linked to drinking?)

Doctors at Mayo and Services Hospital said some of the patients left without receiving treatment on finding out that a police case would be registered against them because drinking alcohol was illegal for Muslims.

A Mayo Hospital doctor, who was on duty at the emergency ward on Chaand Raat, said at least four people left without waiting for treatment when they were asked to take a medico-legal test.

A doctor at Services Hospital said they followed the procedures before admitting people brought to the hospital for excessive alcohol consumption.

More than 5,000 treated

According to teaching hospitals in the city, more than 5,000 patients visited emergency wards on the Eid day and the day after. Most of the visitors were discharged after treatment. Most of those admitted were suffering from gastroenteritis.

Meanwhile, 33 more cases of dengue fever were reported in the city on Friday. Health Department officials said they had started an SMS campaign to spread awareness about the fever among people.

In a statement issued to the media, the Young Doctors Association (YDA) alleged that the number of dengue fever cases was being underreported.

It warned that the carrier mosquito had developed resistance to the insecticide being used by the Health Department. The YDA suggested that mosquito killing lights should be installed at public places.

Published in The Express Tribune, September 3rd, 2011.

COMMENTS (3)

woohoo | 9 years ago | Reply

@pardesi: the use of elephants in religious celebrations by Pakistanis dates back to the traditions of their Arab ancestors. And of course elephants are dime-a-dozen in the deserts of Arabia.

S.D. | 9 years ago | Reply

@pardesi: U HAVE OBJECTIONS?

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