Energy security action plan: Power crisis to end by 2030

Nuclear plants to increase production by 8,800MW.


Irshad Ansari June 14, 2011

ISLAMABAD:


The federal government has approved an energy security action plan on Tuesday that targets an end to the power crisis by 2030.


The plan also envisages production of additional 8,800MW through nuclear power plants coupled with promotion of alternative energy resources for production.

Officials told The Express Tribune that a new nuclear power plant will start producing 340MW in June while construction on two similar projects is also under way. Another 1,000MW project is proposed to be set up in Karachi, according to the plan.

Officials said that talks with nuclear plant suppliers are in process for the promotion of nuclear power plants in Pakistan. The government is also trying to encourage local investors and companies in energy production.

The officials told that the plan will help Pakistan overcome the prevailing energy crisis and also reduce energy cost. The officials said that sites for more nuclear power plants were being reviewed.

They added that the plants will bring billions of rupees of investment amid helping social and economic development in the country.

Published in The Express Tribune, June 15th, 2011.

COMMENTS (9)

CB Guy | 10 years ago | Reply Mush's gift to the country and the MUSH+ version government is now screwing us. We need dams, we need solar power, we need wind power, we need coal powered electricity projects, these are the way out. we can make a 100 small dams in the next 2-3 years which will save us a massive amount of water that we waste every year as well as a good amount of electricity. But then again, it can be done if the Government is willing to work, rather then screwing everything.
Bangash | 10 years ago | Reply 20 years !!!! that is unacceptable.
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