Malala attends first lecture at Oxford University

Nobel laureate attends first class at university five years after she was shot in the head by Taliban


News Desk October 10, 2017
PHOTO: TRIBUNE

Malala Yousafzai on Monday started her studies at the prestigious Oxford University five years to the day that she was shot by the Taliban for campaigning for girls' education.

The 2o-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate tweeted on Monday saying, "5 years ago, I was shot in an attempt to stop me from speaking out for girls' education. Today, I attend my first lectures at Oxford."

Malala, PM Abbasi discuss female education in Pakistan at UN



Her tweet showed a picture of her laptop and a selection of books on logic.

Numerous well-wishers shared congratulatory messages after she posted the picture. The post was liked more that 666,000 times within hours.

Girls shot along with Malala head to Edinburgh Univerisity

Her brother, Khushal Yousafzai, replied to her tweet saying, "Sorry for being a headache for the last five years. So grateful you are still with us. Ik (I know) you miss me but I am coming to oxford in two years."

Malala has been updating her followers and supporters on Twitter about her university journey and continues to ask for academic advises too.

In 2014, Malala became the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and her campaign for children's rights to education across the world has seen her addressing the United Nations on the issue. PM Abbasi at the UNGA also met Malala to discuss women education in Pakistan and appreciated Malala’s resolve to her goals and reiterated his commitment towards education in the country.

COMMENTS (3)

Bunny Rabbit | 3 years ago | Reply Am I the only one still wondering what she has done for Pak in the last few years ?
amir | 3 years ago | Reply Good wishes for your education. Make Pakistan proud!.
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