Met office forecasts rain in lower Sindh today

Rain will continue for the next three days


Our Correspondents August 03, 2016
Rain will continue for the next three days. PHOTO: ONLINE

KARACHI/SUKKUR: The Met office forecasted that it will 'rain the entire day, today' in lower parts of Sindh including Thatta, Badin and Mithi. Some parts of Sukkur will also come under the rain spell.

The weather forecast indicated the temperature will remain between 32 and 34 degrees Celsius for Thursday in Karachi, according to Karachi Met office director Abdul Rashid.

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The pressure system that developed in Rajasthan, India, has grown over time and has now reached rural Sindh, said Rashid, adding that the rain will continue for three days.

Monsoon showers take over lower Sindh

The heavens opened in the central and southern parts of Sindh on Wednesday evening with the onset of the first monsoon showers. The districts of Hyderabad, Jamshoro, Nawabshah, Mirpurkhas, Sanghar, Tando Muhammad Khan, Matiari, Badin and Thatta received moderate to heavy downpour that continued for around an hour.

By 6pm, the Met office had recorded 10 millimetres (mm) of rain in Nawabshah and
5mm in Dadu. The official rain readings of Hyderabad and Jamshoro, where it rained heavily, could not be obtained.

Collapse of a roof from Junejo colony in Kotri taluka of Jamshoro caused the death of Sawera, 18, and injured two children.

The rain also entailed widespread shutdown of electricity in Hyderabad Electric Supply Company’s (Hesco) region that powers 13 districts. The electricity feeders in all the rain affected districts were shut down but almost all have been restored except 20 feeders out of 90 feeders in Hyderabad district and two in Nawabshah, claimed Hesco spokesperson Sadiq Kubar.



“We suspend the electric supply as a precautionary measure when there are thunderstorms,” said Kubar, adding that Hesco teams patrol the areas and supply is restored as soon as they get information that the thunder has stopped.

Gusty winds, rain lash Sukkur

Heavy dust storms followed by rain lashed Sukkur and its surrounding areas at around 12 noon on Wednesday. Despite the disruption of power supply, the rainfall was welcomed by the residents as no rain had taken place in the city since many weeks.

For rain-deprived Karachi, possible respite in nurturing trees

Speed of the wind was 81 kilometres per hour, while volume of rain was only 2mm, according to the Met office.

The intensity of the winds was strong enough to root-out trees and blow away signboards and hoardings. Power supply to almost the entire city was disrupted as soon as the gusty winds started to blow. The disruption was due to snapping of high and low voltage conductors, according to the Sukkur Electric Power Company.

Roofs of many katcha houses blew off with the strong winds but no casualties or injuries have been reported, so far. Rain started to pour down after an hour of gusty winds, flooding all the main roads and streets of the city.

In low lying areas of the city including, Gharibabad, New Pind, Qureshi Road, Numaish Road, New Goth, Waritar Road and others, rain water mixed with sewage entered into houses, adding to the problems of the residents.

Meanwhile, to express their joy over the long awaited rainfall, that turned the weather in the city very pleasant, the residents came out of their houses and headed towards public parks. Children, in many areas, were seen playing in the rain water, while many motorcyclists were seen dragging their motorcycles on foot, as it was difficult for them to start their bikes that had water entering into its silencers.

Similar reports were also received from other parts of upper Sindh including, Ghotki, Shikarpur, Khairpur and others.

Published in The Express Tribune, August 4th, 2016.

 

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