Overseeing border security: Pakistan, Iran call for joint commission

Statement also calls for unity among the Muslim Ummah through early resolution of all differences


Our Correspondent July 28, 2016
Statement also calls for unity among the Muslim Ummah through early resolution of all differences. PHOTO: REUTERS

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan and Iran on Wednesday cited the need to establish institutional mechanisms to oversee border security in addition to fighting against the common threat posed by Da’ish, the Arabic acronym of Islamic State.

This was stated in a joint statement by National Security Advisor Lt Gen Nasser Janjua and Iran’s Secretary of the Supreme National Security Council Ali Shamkhani as the former concluded his three-day trip to Tehran.

“They noted the need for establishing institutional mechanism to oversee the border security, including Joint Commission, and agreed to continue further discussions,” the joint statement read about border security issues discussed between the two countries.

The statement also called for unity among the Muslim Ummah through early resolution of all differences while calling for the “need for fighting against the common threat posed by Da’ish, which was not only posing a grave threat to the stability of the Muslim countries but also giving a bad name to Islam — a religion of peace.”

This came against the backdrop of current strained ties between Iran and Saudi Arabia. Both countries have been at loggerheads due to the situation in Middle East particularly in Syria.

While Iran is supporting Basharul Assad’s regime, Saudi Arabia on the other hand is seeking his removal. The two countries are also at odds with each other over the situation in Yemen.

Relations between the two countries have gone from bad to worse in recent months as this year pilgrims from Iran would not be able to perform Hajj in Saudi Arabia after the two countries failed to reach an agreement on the issue.

Pakistan in the past attempted to mediate between the two key Islamic countries but with little success. Islamabad is trying to follow a delicate path as it neither wants to spoil ties with Iran nor turn its back towards Saudi Arabia with whom the country has longstanding strategic partnership.

Published in The Express Tribune, July 28th, 2016.

COMMENTS

Replying to X

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive.

For more information, please see our Comments FAQ

E-Publications

Most Read