National team hopefuls: Doors still open for Pakistan Cup rejects

New selectors to give fair crack of the whip to all


Nabil Tahir April 25, 2016
Instead of focusing solely on recent performances, the selection committee will take into account the players’ entire record, past and present, as well as their efforts in the training camp. PHOTO COURTESY: PCB

FAISALABAD: Tauseef Ahmed, one of the three selection committee members chosen by Pakistan’s newly appointed chief selector Inzamamul Haq, has revealed that players who are not playing in the Pakistan Cup will also be considered for the upcoming tour of England.

“The Pakistan Cup’s five teams only have 80 players, which is not that big a number,” Ahmed told The Express Tribune. “The 70 players out of the talent pool of 150 who did not get picked for the tournament are also talented and will get their chances to impress and make their way into the national team.”

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Ahmed explained that instead of focusing solely on recent performances, the selection committee will take into account the players’ entire record, including both past and present, as well as their efforts in the training camp.

He further said that under the new regime the players’ fitness will be the decisive factor that could get someone selected or rejected. “Fitness is the most important element in the selection criteria as we want players who can stay fit and are able to handle the pressure in tough conditions throughout the series,” Ahmed declared.

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“We are also observing fitness levels in this tournament and will continue to do so during the camp,” he added.

Meanwhile, chief selector Inzamam, who has seen every match of the ongoing Pakistan Cup in Faisalabad, has expressed his concerns regarding the quality of pitches being used in the tournament.

“If the aim is to produce good players through domestic events, I don’t think the pitches being used here can do that,” said the 1992 World Cup winner.

Inzamam then called for pitches that not only encourage batsmen to play their strokes but also have enough life for bowlers to showcase their skills. “Good pitches produce good players. This is how players are made and groomed,” Inzamam concluded.

Published in The Express Tribune, April 25th,  2016.

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