Situation grave in Pakistan: report

Human Rights Watch expresses concern over human rights conditions in Pakistan.


Express January 24, 2011

KARACHI: A report published by Human Rights Watch (HRW) expressed concern over the human rights conditions in Pakistan, citing breakdown of law enforcement, missing persons, alleged military abuse during operations in the tribal areas and discriminatory laws and violence against minorities as major concerns.

The 21st annual World Report by the HRW is a summary of human rights conditions in over 90 countries worldwide.

The report, an overview of major events in Pakistan during 2010, states that the relief efforts after the July 2010 floods were free of any ‘systematic discrimination’ against minorities.

Suicide and armed attacks by militants targeted every sector of society, including journalists and religious minorities, in the larger cities of the country.

Expressing concern over the actions of security forces during operations in the tribal areas, the report states that a large number of militants belonging to al Qaeda, the Taliban, and other armed groups were picked up but hardly any were prosecuted in the courts.

Drone strikes by US forces on the tribal belt increased in 2010, with over 87 strikes since October 15, 2010 being reported.

On the situation in Balochistan, the report says that teachers from ethnic and religious minorities have started transferring out of the province after targeted incidents against education personnel.

The United States was the largest donor to flood relief efforts in 2010. HRW says the Leahy Law, which requires the US state department to certify no US aid is involved in human rights abuses, was violated on a number of occasions.

Expressing concern over the actions of security forces during operations in the tribal areas, the report states that a large number of militants belonging to al Qaeda, the Taliban, and other armed groups were picked up but hardly any were prosecuted in the courts.

Drone strikes by US forces on the tribal belt increased in 2010, with over 87 strikes since October 15, 2010 being reported.

On the situation in Balochistan, the report says that teachers from ethnic and religious minorities have started transferring out of the province after targeted incidents against education personnel.

The United States was the largest donor to flood relief efforts in 2010. HRW says the Leahy Law, which requires the US state department to certify no US aid is involved in human rights abuses, was violated on a number of occasions.

COMMENTS (4)

sultan a khan | 11 years ago | Reply Yes, that is right. There is no doubt that ministeries reminded, repeated reninded rports and recommendations are dieing in dark locked cells of Pakistani ministeries and parliament. Due to the crimenal nature of these offices and hypocracy of Pakistani politicans the people of Pakistan are intentionally avoided in receiveing justice in time. Now,Supreme Court of Pakistan is the only hope to take actions in these matters otherwise Pakistan's cancer will become incureable..Sultan A Khan, USA
Vidyut | 11 years ago | Reply Nice photo. Speaks far more than the article. The primitive beauty of destruction - that fights to remain as it is and doesn't allow any order to establish itself. The beauty of ancient man winning the world with might, where the law of the jungle said that might is right. No place for the weak. To be heard, you must kill those fighting for the microphone. Warriors, all of them..... still unaware that the world has made other means possible. Sad. Sad.
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