Russian arrested after Turkey blast suspected of Islamic State links: foreign ministry

Authorities said on Thursday the army had killed almost 200 Islamic State militants in response to the blast


Reuters January 14, 2016
Turkish policemen block access to the Blue Mosque after the blast. PHOTO: AFP

MOSCOW:

Russia's foreign ministry said on Thursday a Russian man arrested after this week's deadly Istanbul bombing was suspected of having links to Islamic State and that such extremists "feel comfortable" in Turkey.


The ministry made the statement after a suicide bomber blew himself up in the center of Istanbul on Tuesday, killing 10 German tourists. Turkish police later arrested three Russians and authorities said on Thursday the army had killed almost 200 Islamic State militants in response to the blast.


One of the Russians arrested in Turkey was Aidar Suleimanov, Russian Foreign Ministry spokesperson Maria Zakharova said on Thursday.


Istanbul suicide blast kills 10 tourists

 

She said Suleimanov, born in 1984, was suspected of being linked to IS, while Russian news agencies quoted an unnamed Russian security source as saying he was suspected of helping send new recruits from Russia to the militant group.


"This is precisely a case where extremists accused of terrorist activity in Russia feel comfortable living for so many years in certain foreign states," Zakharova told a weekly news briefing. "These terrorists are confident of full safety and that they can not be reached by Russian justice."

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She went on to criticize Turkey's attitude toward suspected militants, saying: "The country's authorities have often declined to cooperate, including with the Russian Federation ... even when all personal data have been identified and all necessary evidence gathered and submitted properly."

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