A Chitrali girl’s encounter with destiny

Published: March 31, 2011

Small town girl cooks up a storm with her culinary expertise. PHOTO: THE EXPRESS TRIBUNE

It’s not easy being a woman and working in the male-weighted hospitality industry of Pakistan. But Rubina Qadeem Khan, who inherited all the disadvantages of belonging to a poor family in a remote village of Chitral is doing just that. Talking to Express Tribune, she said she considered herself as an ambassador of women in this highly competitive modern profession.

She said she was inducted into this profession by her sister who was working in a hotel. Rubina had just finished high school and it was an opening she could not refuse. The hotel kitchen fascinated her. She thought that as a woman, it was her place. Men had no business to be there but women had been too shy to step out; it was all their fault. Setting her heart on this goal, she graduated and got a diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management.

“Except for my father, all other members of my family opposed the idea. They thought I would not be able to give time to my studies. My mother was not happy with my decision at all. She did not consider my job good for me. She used to cry when I got home with hands singed from handling hot pots. But my father, who worked in the government and who I used to help in the kitchen, as he also ran a small food stall as a part time job, thought differently. He said, “Never mind the burns: Rubina is learning to make new dishes every day. I cannot forget the bitter cold in which I used to work with my father but that tough training with my father made me so determined that today I am a scholar of Culinary Arts at a University in the United States,” Rubina said glowing with understandable sense of achievement.

“We lived in a small village strung along the valleys where the life and economy was based on subsistence farming. The idea of going out of my small village was novel and thrilling. I was very adventurous. Hiking, climbing and camping was my passion. I am also very determined and once I take a decision I don’t step back. When I came to know about COTHM, I applied for a student loan from my community and a scholarship from the college which I got. At that time I could only afford to have one meal a day and few hours to rest with my full time study and full time job, but I knew this would pass. When the USEFP announced scholarships in 2007, I was working in Lahore and had completed my certification. I applied for the scholarship and was one of the 11 people who got it from among hundreds of applicants. In the US I was enrolled on the President’s honored list. Now when someone asks my mother about my work she proudly says her daughter is a chef, and it makes me smile.”

“My work demands mental and physical strength. It’s not about cooking for a small family. It’s about   thousands of hotel guests. If you are not strong enough to work then you won’t stay on your job for long. Men outnumber you in the kitchen. I was the only girl in food production area among an all male staff. So I used to be very quiet and observant. Everyone was good to me. But then things started changing when I reached the senior level. I was faced with jealousy of the males. But I have learned to survive; it is a great experience.”

“The hospitality industry demands the readiness to accept change and diversity. I would say it is a challenge for young women to be taken seriously. Women need to project a great deal more confidence than their equal male counterpart to be noticed as an authority. Once her head is held high and her eye contact is direct, there is no stopping a woman. In the great hospitality industry we do best because women are naturally care takers and warm humans. Hospitality is about relationships and women are naturals in this area!”

“For me, there is still a long way ahead. It’s important to take decisions for your own self, think what you really want to do- look at its pros and cons. Don’t let society decide for you,” Rubina said philosophically. “At the end of the day it’s your life. So you should be the one to decide. I am fortunate that my parents always preferred their children’s education and career over social pressures and taboos. And this has really helped me to focus on my profession. I wish every girl is given that chance,” Rubina said. She looked a picture of satisfaction.”

Rubina explained that hospitality was a multibillion dollar industry that had a potential to absorb women in different departments such as housekeeping, beauty salon, massage centers, guest relations and the kitchen etc. The media can attract women to this profession by projecting it in a positive manner.

The writer works for International Labour Organisation (ILO). This story is a part of an ILO-The Express Tribune project: Promoting Gender Equality for Decent Employment (GE4DE).

Published in The Express Tribune, March 31st, 2011.

Reader Comments (109)

  • R. Khan
    Mar 31, 2011 - 9:52AM

    You made us proud pf PK women!Recommend

  • Mar 31, 2011 - 12:22PM

    You go girl!!!, I would really like to help the sisters & through them the kids of
    Pakistan. If you had any ideas, or would like to hear mine, please email me at ggtcb@hotmail.com, anyone else listening is welcome to. My beewe will monitor all corispondence, she is my best guide. I rareiil copy articals but I am going to copy this one to reread sucess stories are far to rare. and as always remember tooooo INCREASE THE PEACE!!!! ASAK HAROON
    Recommend

  • muhammad asad
    Mar 31, 2011 - 1:02PM

    This girl is the real “qaum ki beti”. she came from a conservative background yet she fought against misogyny & the attitudes of the men in our society.we need more women like her in pakistan.

    She’s a million times better than those Alevels,BBA,MBBS,MBA girls who waste their education by getting married & staying at home to become just baby producing factories.

    This girl is much better than those degree holding women who choose to live off the earnings
    of their husbands & don’t have a career after marriage.Recommend

  • Mar 31, 2011 - 1:02PM

    Congradulations, you made it, its just a shame you ended up leaving Pakistan, or rather could'nt achieve the same sucess here, I am trying to find a way to help, the women and indirctely helping the kids through helping the women, because you are right the women posess the characteristics, to serve and help others. if you have any Ideas or would like to hear mine, emailme at ggtcb@hotmail.com, anyone else that has any ideas is invited to email me to.
    The support and understanding of your father is what true honor is all about, and I would like to whole heartedly congradulate him, he could be more of a role model to the men of Pakistan thanyou could be for the girls, or at least as equal. If your father has any way of emailing I would like to hear from him as well.
    Keep fighting the good fight and remember INCREASE THE PEACE!!!!!!

    ASAK that crazy american who wants to be a PAKISTANI HAROON
    Recommend

  • arif akthar
    Mar 31, 2011 - 1:05PM

    Well done rubina ,you do pakistan proud!!

    Women like rubina,sherry rehman,asma jehangir,sheharbano taseer,mukhtara mai give hope that pakistan still has a chance of a bright future.

    Our young girls should make these women as their role models so they can contribute positively in society rather than waste away their lives as glorified masis in their homes.Recommend

  • saher
    Mar 31, 2011 - 1:08PM

    :) inspirational!Recommend

  • ayesha
    Mar 31, 2011 - 1:08PM

    THUMBS UP!!Recommend

  • Harris Durrani
    Mar 31, 2011 - 1:09PM

    Phenomenal woman..what I love about articles like these is that people should learn to appreciate technical skillsRecommend

  • Shola
    Mar 31, 2011 - 1:29PM

    This inspiring! Thank you so much for sharing it. We need more women like Rubina!Recommend

  • kamar
    Mar 31, 2011 - 1:31PM

    very proud of u. my wish is that we all should look within to find what we like to do most .and make it our career .then only can we enjoy our work and be proud of our self .like rubina. my very best to you Recommend

  • faizan burney
    Mar 31, 2011 - 2:00PM

    girl whipped to death on court’s orders:

    http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/03/29/bangladesh.lashing.death/index.html?hpt=P1

    These horrific,barbaric acts are still being done against women.Recommend

  • abc
    Mar 31, 2011 - 2:00PM

    where is she currently working?Recommend

  • Shahid Sultan
    Mar 31, 2011 - 2:18PM

    Rubina! Proud of you, the way you have achieved your destination, you are the factual role model for the entire femalesRecommend

  • Amyn Noorani
    Mar 31, 2011 - 2:22PM

    Rubina. We are proud of youRecommend

  • Mar 31, 2011 - 3:37PM

    we r proud of uRecommend

  • mirza akbarali
    Mar 31, 2011 - 3:40PM

    your hard work and determination made it .we r proud of u.Recommend

  • Adil Motani
    Mar 31, 2011 - 4:09PM

    You have made the Nation Proud!Recommend

  • Nasir
    Mar 31, 2011 - 4:41PM

    “Men had no business there” WOW should i call it “Islamic feminist bigots” or what? What i have found in practical experience that men are much better cooks but that is just my subjective experience.

    But no one has the right to create boundaries in the name of anything.Recommend

  • MS
    Mar 31, 2011 - 6:15PM

    So proud of you!! Please never forget Pakistan!Recommend

  • farhat gondal
    Mar 31, 2011 - 9:23PM

    Wao u hve dne a gr8 job. we shud always listen to our own hearts. coz if we enjoy our work. we can make it inspirational for othrs as wellRecommend

  • Saira Qurban
    Apr 1, 2011 - 1:48AM

    it was a wonderful interview u made us proud dear may god bless u alwayz!Recommend

  • Fida Hassan
    Apr 1, 2011 - 7:43AM

    I am immensely delighted to hear about this girl because i also belong to Chitral. So well done Rubina we all are proud of you. People like you are the real role model for this nation, so please continue you good and hard work and make us more and more proud.Recommend

  • Zohra S. Khan
    Apr 1, 2011 - 9:52AM

    Well done Rubine. I am particularly pleased to see that you proudly recognise your roots, efforts of your parent specially your father and combine dedication of all the sisters for the sole purpose of achieving education. It is therefore said that educate a boy and you educate a family, educate a girl and you educate a generation. Keep up the good work Rubina!
    ZohraRecommend

  • Mehwish Moin
    Apr 1, 2011 - 10:33AM

    Way to go girl…. Wishing U much more ahead!Recommend

  • ba ha
    Apr 1, 2011 - 11:40AM

    Bravo! Bon CourageRecommend

  • Haroon Musabit
    Apr 1, 2011 - 11:54AM

    @Nasir:

    Take a chill pill Nasir, everyone knows, that men are the best chefs in the world, and thats changing fast now that champions like RUBINA are fighting their ways into that commercial enviroment!! And also the vast majority of the kitchens of the world are femanned by women, andmost of them are bare foot and pregnant and dominated over by narrow minded men. So just step off and don't rain on her 15 minutes of fame!!! andI am sure we will be hearing more positive accomplishments from RUBINA in the future!!, What have you done lately? Remmember folks to INCREASE THE PEACE!!!! ASAK HAROON
    Recommend

  • Abdul Ghaffar Khan
    Apr 1, 2011 - 3:09PM

    Inspiring, really amazed to c that. i know my people are crazy to explore new ventures but seeing this really delights me. but the question is that whether all the sisters out there had to went thrugh the same suffering as Rubina did or our policy makers would now come forward to discuss the gender issues related to women being part of an islamic and culturally complex society as here. there is an immense need for creating specialized fields where women can do the best while keeping her dignity and pride. Recommend

  • Amna Khan
    Apr 1, 2011 - 4:51PM

    I appreciate the courage and efforts she put in her journey to become a chef which is considered as men role in the society. I also appreciate men’s positive comments which reflects their acceptance for the change role of women in this societyRecommend

  • Sikander
    Apr 1, 2011 - 6:22PM

    well done Rubina, stay wherever you are and do not come back.

    I would love to see you go even further, if you come back I am sure that would be end of your fame.Recommend

  • DR rAHMAT
    Apr 1, 2011 - 6:40PM

    well this is not only story of sheer hard work and dedication, but also availability of chance and opportunities. not all will get opportunity like Rubina to complete their studies abroad. having said that, it is also true that fortune favors the brave. i also belongs to the same area and the message is clear for everyone,, sky is the limit, keep on and contribute positively in the uplift of human resources in this far flung area.Recommend

  • israr ahmad
    Apr 1, 2011 - 7:12PM

    Rubina.we are proud of your hard work. do you really belong to Chitral. it is strangeRecommend

  • Apr 1, 2011 - 8:11PM

    Amazing girl, good student and very hardworking professional and a beautifull human being… her name is Rubina Qadeem Khan.
    She is very much part of the COTHM family and we are proud of her achievements in hospitality industry.
    All the best Rubina and pls dont forget us.

    With Culinary Regards

    Ahmed Shafiq
    Executive Director
    COTHM PAKISTANRecommend

  • Ahmed Jehanzeb
    Apr 1, 2011 - 9:27PM

    Some people are destined for greatness! Rubina sounds like one of them. Well done!Recommend

  • farhan
    Apr 1, 2011 - 11:03PM

    We are all proud of you.. Keep it up and our whole family is glad to read the success story.. This is a lesson for everyone that hard work pays off..Recommend

  • Nasreen
    Apr 1, 2011 - 11:09PM

    Highly impressive and attractive oneRecommend

  • Apr 1, 2011 - 11:12PM

    Bravo, Young Lady. You are a light house showing the way out of stormy seas.

    Khudi ko kar buland itna ke har taqder se pehle
    Khuda bande se ye poche bata teri raza kia hai
    Recommend

  • mehnaz
    Apr 2, 2011 - 12:04AM

    Hey Rubina,
    I feel so proud to read about you in this paper today. Coming from a mountain area in Pakistan and doing my best in the USA i share your feelings and hard work that your are putting into your work. Go ahead… The world is yours. your determination has set a destination for you. You are destined to marvel and excel!

    I wish you all the best in your work in future!!

    Mehnaz
    USARecommend

  • Ranjit
    Apr 2, 2011 - 12:35AM

    I am happy to know that there is room for Pakistani women to excel! Recommend

  • Rubina Qadeem Khan
    Apr 2, 2011 - 11:45AM

    Hello everyone,

    First of all i thank to Allah for all the blessings and thanks for my family for their support all the time. I wanna thank my friends all around the world for being there for me.

    I really appreciate all of you taking time to leave comments on my interview, and i believe that your valuable comments are another way of appreciating and encouragement to achieve more in my career.
    Just to let everybody know that i am working in pakistan in a five star hotel since i got back (2009)and very happy to serve in my country.

    thanks once again.
    Remember me in Your prayers.

    Rubina Qadeem Khan.Recommend

  • ali raza
    Apr 2, 2011 - 1:03PM

    Well done. We all r with u.Recommend

  • Rabia Razzaque
    Apr 2, 2011 - 3:53PM

    To address gender inequalities it is important to bring women’s voices to the forefront, the ILO is trying to empower women in all professions and in this endeavor we are pushing media professionals to explore sensitive issues of gender, society, and human rights. So media doesn’t remain as a dormant tool to cover issues and events but becomes an active stakeholder and development partner. If we ; the commoners start thinking, debating and writing about issues of gender biases, stereotypes and other in-sensitivities we can ensure a just and fair working environment for women in our country.
    These may seem small things but they’re not. Gender stereotypes are pernicious. Gender stereotypes enter our consciousness in small and subtle ways. Like the microscopic viruses hidden in the air we breathe, they quietly enter our minds, often unnoticed, sometimes disguised. And like viruses, they settle in our bodies, strengthen and solidify, until they have a shape, a form, a manifested reality. Just like viruses become diseases, ideas become ideologies, words become worldviews.
    And unless we resolve these ingrained issues now, these viruses will become chronic diseases that will become incurable. So as a first step, let’s realize our collective potential as a nation and start treating gender issues as a bigger development issue and not as women’s issue.Recommend

  • benz
    Apr 3, 2011 - 10:23AM

    @muhammad asad:
    I appreciate your thoughts for gender equality..but how can you say baby producing factory…
    i was a working lady before my baby..i went to abroad for myself and i am a qualified professional..have you ever read about child deve,lopment at an infant stage,..how it is important for a baby to receive the warmth of his/ her mother for the first two years..what do you expect a woman go out to work anf feeding her baby the formula milk at home by some body else..she goes out and depriving her baby her breastmilk which is the best source of nutrients for her baby in intial two years..fine u can solve this two but my dear the warmth of mother’s skin gives the baby very healthy emotional development, the baby learns to trust his parents..i think i dont need to say any thing else..Recommend

  • benz
    Apr 3, 2011 - 10:28AM

    @Haroon Murabit:
    that was very nice to hear from a daring girl ..
    but let me write here..she was brought up and raised in islamabad, not chitral..
    she was given schooling in islamabad not chitral..she was given all oppertunities in islamabad, she got her inspirations in islamabad not in chitral..i bet if she was in chitral she would never get any single chance to enter into a hotel…
    i think the title should be
    A Pakistani gilr’s encounter with destiny..

    or An Isloo girl’s encounter with destiny…Recommend

  • fatima aman
    Apr 3, 2011 - 12:00PM

    Rubina! You are a real RUBI, we are proud of you… You made all women proud… best of luck for everythingRecommend

  • Hina
    Apr 3, 2011 - 5:43PM

    Dear Rubina,
    They say when there is a will, there is a way. So you proved it in reality and yeah fortune always smiles at bold.I am sure this is just the start of your career.You have to touch the zenith of skies.I am sure you can and will do it.We all as Ismaili community and Pakistani are proud of you.Girls like you are the real cause of inspiration and strength for those who feel disempowered.Best of luck for your future endeavors and remember Struggle is the meaning of life as His Highness Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah said.Once again me and Sher Baz (My husband) really congratulate you and pray for your successes ahead.Keep it up.Recommend

  • Dr. Khalil
    Apr 3, 2011 - 5:59PM

    Mohabat sahab We are proud of her .. please mind yoour language… she is from our district Recommend

  • Dr. Khalil
    Apr 3, 2011 - 6:09PM

    Yes She is Much precious then RUBI .. but ..Recommend

  • Ahmad
    Apr 3, 2011 - 7:59PM

    @ Benz
    You have a point here .She may be originally from Chitral but the opportunity was offered to her in Islamabad. Born and living in Chitral girls are no way so lucky.Recommend

  • Munira Barkat Ali Sukhiyani
    Apr 3, 2011 - 9:43PM

    Dear Rubina,
    I would like to congratulate you and your family for this endless effort and remarkable achievement.
    You deserve this and I know that you will go more further in your success.We all are very proud of you. You are a very determined and powerful girl in your ambitions provided by the courage from your family, and with this brightness of confidence, you will conquer a lot more ahead Insha’Allah!
    Best of luck for all of your future endeavors!
    Take care,
    With Warm Regards,
    MuniraRecommend

  • Apr 3, 2011 - 10:15PM

    Indeed it’s a great effort made by this young lady who hails all away from Chitral. Appreciable! Bravo! No doubt, Pakistani women are playing an equal role as men in the long run of better society.Recommend

  • rehan
    Apr 3, 2011 - 11:49PM

    rubina i am proud of you!!!
    and really happy that you are my friend!!!
    see you in june!Recommend

  • Nighat-akbar Shah
    Apr 4, 2011 - 12:35AM

    We congratulate Rubina and her family for her success! Certainly, she has accomplished this position by dedication and hard work. No matter where she was brought up, she is a daughter of committed Chitrali parents and deserves a Chitrali Beti’s respect. Keep it up dear!Recommend

  • Rizwan Qadir Baig
    Apr 4, 2011 - 3:15AM

    Congratulations Rubina!! One can really anticipate your hard work and commitment.
    It’s not easy for any women living in such a male dominant and double standard society where we talk a lot about empowerment of women, but in practicality we are always there to put fences around women for the sake of so called honor.
    It’s not just your family, but your friends, well wishers; in fact the whole community would surely appreciate your success and achievements.

    It’s still long way to go and so many snags yet to cross, so best of luck rubi, and lots of wishes for your future…Recommend

  • Apr 4, 2011 - 3:26AM

    It is an inspiring story. I believe much can be learnt from individual’s experiences provided they are narrated to a larger audience. Rubina’s story does not demand appreciation for breaking away from the social and cultural norms but speaks of an endeavour of rational choice amidst a difficult situation of individual and collective struggle. I would like to pay homage to her father and other family members for their positive support in making her what she is today. In fact Chitral is different in many respects from rest of the province for people in general (both educated and otherwise) live intellectually engaged life discussing, contesting and ridiculing at times all that is considered ‘taboo’ by the so called moderates. Any culturally conscious observation will be testify to this fact. Recommend

  • Mir Wali
    Apr 4, 2011 - 9:57AM

    Rubina, I am very happy and really appreciate your hard work and struggle for the building of your career. Absolutely, you are a role modal for our coming generations especially for Chitralies. So carry on your life, because ‘struggle is the meaning of Life defeat and victories are in the hands of God’

    I am proud of you being a Chitrali

    Mir Wali Chitrali
    British Council, PakistanRecommend

  • Jalib
    Apr 4, 2011 - 10:07AM

    @benz: Your name already suggest how proud you are of your own identity. Your inferiority complex shows in your writing when you contest on place fo upbringing rather than roots. Youa re pakistnai because you are born in Pakistan, By going abroad (i doubt the professional claim) you dont become British or American. Shall I say that you would be a loser if you didnt go abroad and so you should not be called pakistani just because you earn abroad. sillya rgument. The girl just said they moved from chitral and it is the effort of the family (again that belongs to chitral) came to islamabad leaving thier land and working day and night for education. The girl if she was in Islamabad or chitral would have excelled because it is the direction which matters not mere jobs. She got opportunity becoz she had input of hard work and sense of direction.
    Why are you so concious of baby label. Isnt it true that thousadns of women abondon thier studies for children even when they knwo they can manage thier life workign and raising kids. The world is changing and so is life opportunities. Who told you that 9 to 5 is the only option. there are ten thousand opportunities that you can work as well as raise your child even at home. So stop this bodily odour drama. Youa re jobless means you are jobless. Dont blame your innocent child.
    @hina: It is sick that even here you show your love for your husband rather than congratulating the girl. grow up no one gives a damn about your love for your husbands. sick PDA.
    @dr. khalil: learn to respect women and not to make derogratory remarks.
    @ rabia Razzaque: well done and the compilation fo artile was worth a praise.
    @rubine: now you knwo how people view your efforts. Some Very colourful and some very diguised ugly comments. Keep your spirits high and don’t you give a damn of negative vibes.Recommend

  • Hina
    Apr 4, 2011 - 10:35AM

    A true success story…very inspiring….best of luck !!Recommend

  • Kausar Ali Shah
    Apr 4, 2011 - 10:52AM

    Dear Rubina,
    Bieng a Chitrali, We are proud of you, Keep it up and be an example for the Gender.(Ispa ta sura fakhar kosian, ispa umeed sher ki tu ispa ilaqu shak xorginian ten hamosh mehnat kori proshti biko bachen e misal savoz bos, ispa DUA ispa wishes tasum sheni)

    Syed Kausar Ali Shah,
    IslamabadRecommend

  • dr.fayaz
    Apr 4, 2011 - 12:01PM

    well done rubina.every chitrali should be proud of you.keep it up.Recommend

  • TAQDIR ALI KHAN
    Apr 4, 2011 - 12:16PM

    well done Rubina, keep it up, we the people of Gilgit Baltistan proud of you.

    TAQDIR ADVOCATERecommend

  • Rabia Razzaque
    Apr 4, 2011 - 12:37PM

    We keep forgetting its not women from one part of the world who need such platoforms, its women in entirety who have to be provided such forums and voice to raise their issues and concerns. The severity of the problems that working women face may be different but the core of the problem is just the same.

    Please advocate for gender equal treatment or fair treatment for both men and women.
    More on ILO’s facebook page called Engender work..

    http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001488525314Recommend

  • Ali
    Apr 4, 2011 - 2:11PM

    Its only because of individuals like Rubina that I have not given up on Pakistan completely—yet!Recommend

  • Apr 4, 2011 - 2:26PM

    Its great to read out this piece of news regarding Rubina. She done a good job and open ways for others to think and bring change in social setup. Chitral is a remote area where limit opportunities to earn bread. Choosing alternate ways for earning is really good and she is indeed inspiration women in prospect.Recommend

  • Sana Ahmed
    Apr 4, 2011 - 3:04PM

    Rubina…..i have no words to share my happiness and tell you that how proud i am feeling now.
    You are my star….i never knew, i have got a gem in my friends
    May you always prosper and excel in your field. May your every wish come true amin.Recommend

  • R ibrahim
    Apr 4, 2011 - 3:06PM

    well done Rubina sister proud of you.

    RegardsRecommend

  • Murad Akbar
    Apr 4, 2011 - 3:33PM

    Such an interesting news. Despite being surrounded by conflicted and rigid societies of Afghanistan, Dir and Swat District of Pakistan, Chitral (where Ms. Rubina come from) has been in forefront to welcome social development initiatives and maintaining the peace. That is the reason Chitral is called land of peace and has come forward as the third district after peshawar and mardan in Khyber Pakhtoonkwa in terms of school enrollment at the primary level. Thousands of young women are getting education in higher educational institution across Pakistan. Recently a young girl from Chitral has made her way in the Pakistan woman’s junior cricket team. A young lady has completed her PhD from UK, many others are on their way to get the doctorate degree in different fields. These are just few examples, otherwise Chitral if one compares is progressing much faster than other areas in terms of education, health, gender mainstreaming without compromising on its social and religious values. Ms. Rubina’s case is another milestone that has been crossed by another Chitral lady. Chitral society is extremely friendly to change because of its tolerant culture and progressiveness. People in Chitral are looking forward to have their sons and daughters who are trend setters to come back to home and take a lead role to develop Chitral. Recommend

  • Apr 4, 2011 - 3:36PM

    Wow Rubina! you did a great job and opened new ways for women to earn better respect in society. I hope you will make efforts for the rest of your friends to come forward for better services. Recommend

  • Jadoon
    Apr 4, 2011 - 5:09PM

    Great going. I wish all the people in Pakistan were moderate and forward looking like Ismailies. Recommend

  • Mohd Nadir
    Apr 4, 2011 - 5:49PM

    Ms Rubina very honestly yoy are doing great jobe…………..
    we r proud of you..
    dosron k liye ek Missal ban jaw.
    best of luckRecommend

  • Rahim
    Apr 4, 2011 - 6:02PM

    Well done rubina. We are proud of youRecommend

  • Apr 4, 2011 - 6:46PM

    You go girl!Recommend

  • Apr 4, 2011 - 10:23PM

    WOW, such an amazing achievement!Recommend

  • Fardad Ali Shah Sanick
    Apr 4, 2011 - 11:51PM

    We really appreciate ur hard work and untiring efforts… Its all ur goal and desires for success make u successful. So u r a great lesson for the girls living all over the world.. We all are a change factor and can bring very positive change in the society…….Recommend

  • Aamir
    Apr 5, 2011 - 4:50AM

    Mashah ALLAH, May almighty ALLAH (SWT) bless her with immense success in days to come……Ameen.Recommend

  • Dr. Khalil
    Apr 5, 2011 - 7:37AM

    Rubi ! you are simply wonderfulRecommend

  • Muhammad Abeer Khan
    Apr 5, 2011 - 12:34PM

    Dear Rubina,

    Very Well-done!! Shabash, Keep it up. Wherever you go whatever you do please never forget dignity, reputations and values of a Chitrali daughter.

    Thanks!!Recommend

  • Apr 5, 2011 - 2:46PM

    Well done Rubina! The entire valley of Arkari celeberates your success! You have made us all so proud!!! May Allah help you achieve new heights in your career! Recommend

  • Apr 5, 2011 - 3:15PM

    Well done-Bo Jam Ma Zhoor Recommend

  • Khalil
    Apr 5, 2011 - 5:10PM

    Rubina you are so cute so sweet .. you are in our heats, in our soulRecommend

  • Khalil
    Apr 5, 2011 - 5:15PM

    Rubina you are very specialRecommend

  • Afzal syed
    Apr 5, 2011 - 5:43PM

    well done our daughter ! I can’t believe that a girl from a very small town , inspite of difficult culture manners and family b.ground you proved that nothing is impossible . First of all congrates to your great parents , because this is the trust they make on you , and to you because you make a ideal identity for you , for your parents and for the area . and I highly appreciate your struggle , because this is not easier to face this this kinds of difficulties . I wish , I pray and I hope that our every daughter make us proud like you . Ameen !Recommend

  • Mansoor Ali
    Apr 5, 2011 - 6:39PM

    @Benz and Ahmad: I agree to some extent. the question is as a Chitrali I am studying here in Islamabad as well and all the rural students do come to the large cities for their higher studies including Chitral where there is no singel degree granting University.What you call the thousands of Chitrali/Other Rural graduates?? Isloo?? Karachite?? Lahori?? Pekhawari??Recommend

  • Rabia Razzaque
    Apr 5, 2011 - 7:02PM

    How could she be from Chitral? She just got it all so easy!
    Has she struggled hard enough? We see women as domestic servants and those at the brick kilns or in farms under scorching sun all day, they work hard!
    Why has Rubina got this chance? She must have contacts or references!
    I want to question all of you who have been critical of Rubina’s life struggle- Do you know the essence of the message captured in this interview? Or Did you not care?
    The idea was to highlight women working in unconventional occupations and bringing them to forefront. Yes, there are other areas too where women contribute. Women contribute as mothers, by staying home looking after their family, feeding and upbringing them (let alone the institution for child care could cost a fortune, start paying a maid or a nursery and you will know what I am saying!), there is the productive role of women, fetching water, maintaining the livestock and collecting wood in villages that is not even considered work! In care economy for instance; be it your mother or mine, they are expected to provide us care at home if we are sick (unless it’s so bad that you have to go the doctor, home remedies are mothers thing!). So yes, women everywhere are contributing directly or indirectly to the economy as providers, family helpers or even savers.
    So, Rubina’s interview is in no way in denial of the many other women who are struggling their way up the ladder in their capacities.
    I have interviewed Rubina, she is very much a Chitrali girl (if that matters in anyway; she could be an African, an Asian or any other ethnic group and still be a ROLE MODEL). I am proud to have found her story and I am on my journey to find more of such unsung heroes. So can I request all of us to be encouraging of women who dare to dream and with dignity, much perseverance and a lot of hard work attain their goals. We can support them and be a partner in development or we can go on talking about petty issues wasting energy and cyberspace!
    I hope we all protect the image of our women and promote equality for women in the world of work.Recommend

  • Rabia Razzaque
    Apr 5, 2011 - 7:07PM

    How could she be from Chitral? She just got it all so easy!
    Has she struggled hard enough? We see women as domestic servants and those at the brick kilns or in farms under scorching sun all day, they work hard!
    Why has Rubina got this chance? She must have contacts or references!
    I want to question all of you who have been critical of Rubina’s life struggle- Do you know the essence of the message captured in this interview? Or Did you not care?

    The idea was to highlight women working in unconventional occupations and bringing them to forefront. Yes, there are other areas too where women contribute. Women contribute as mothers, by staying home looking after their family, feeding and upbringing them (let alone the institution for child care could cost a fortune, start paying a maid or a nursery and you will know what I am saying!), there is the productive role of women, fetching water, maintaining the livestock and collecting wood in villages that is not even considered work! In care economy for instance; be it your mother or mine, they are expected to provide us care at home if we are sick (unless it’s so bad that you have to go the doctor, home remedies are mothers thing!). So yes, women everywhere are contributing directly or indirectly to the economy as providers, family helpers or even savers.

    So, Rubina’s interview is in no way in denial of the many other women who are struggling their way up the ladder in their capacities.

    I have interviewed Rubina, she is very much a Chitrali girl (if that matters in anyway; she could be an African, an Asian or any other ethnic group and still be a ROLE MODEL). I am proud to have found her story and I am on my journey to find more of such unsung heroes.

    So can I request all of us to be encouraging of women who dare to dream and with dignity, much perseverance and a lot of hard work attain their goals. We can support them and be a partner in development or we can go on talking about petty issues wasting energy and cyberspace!

    I hope we all protect the image of our women and promote equality for women in the world of work.Recommend

  • Amina Qadeem
    Apr 6, 2011 - 12:54AM

    Dear Rubi, Mubarak. I hope and pray that this is the beginning of your successes.

    Dear Rabia, thank you so much for appreciating my sister’s efforts. This interview is just a glimpse of her hard work. She didn’t mention the pain she has gone through as woman in production area. She was used to go hotel directly from college and most of the time was not able to have lunch. We were used to meet her only on weekends, because she was going college before we wakeup and reach home after we sleep. Her colleagues (Male) gave her very tough time, intentionally, to get out her from work, but she is still in that field.

    I believe this recognition is reward for her by God. Recommend

  • Andrea
    Apr 6, 2011 - 8:12AM

    @Jadoon: I can’t understand why you want to link a religion to her achievement? The majority of successful women in Pakistan belong to mainstream Muslim families who feel that girls deserve every opportunity to better themselves. There are progressive groups in all of Pakistan’s religious communities. Whether she is Sunni or Shia or Christian or Buddhist is not the issue. What is great is that another young Pakistani woman has learned to follow her passion and she is succeeding. We all celebrate her accomplishment. The fact that she comes from a rural mountainous region is all the more inspiring and the fact that she received support in the national capital Islamabad and the Punjab provincial capital of Lahore shows how we as a people are inclusive. So please don’t take a great achievement and try to score points for a religious group for no reason. It’s a turn off. Just respect all groups and all people.Recommend

  • Apr 6, 2011 - 9:30AM

    Weldon Rubina I was really happy to know so hardworking girls. Being a Chitral based Journalist usually Chitral people are easy like and some lazy but it is great that being a girl from a very remote locality of Chitral she working in such a place where perhaps some shy guys also hesitate but I appreciate it and want to encourage. being a working and professional journalist me ready for any type of support and for all other girls of Chitral. I have prepared a Documentry Documentary on three sisters of Toq Hazrat Abad Mastuj which is available on website of http://www.app.com.pk on APP Video News Service by searching Chitral. any how you can send me your views and comments as well as press release to my email ID that is gulhamad@gmail.com, gulhamadfarooqui@yahoo.comRecommend

  • Fardad Ali Shah Sanick
    Apr 6, 2011 - 10:05AM

    Really very appreciatable work done by sister Rubina……..Recommend

  • zabi
    Apr 6, 2011 - 10:24AM

    Dear Rubina,

    well…first of all accept my heartiest congratulation 4 your this wonderful work which you have done…i just say well done Rubina…we all chitrali around the world are really happy and feel proud with your such achievement….well done once again.

    Thanks & Regards Zabi Karachi

    zabiz79@yahoo.com)Recommend

  • Nisar
    Apr 6, 2011 - 11:06AM

    Congrate Rubi. The story is realy impressing one. And your passion towards a uinque field of job is a good lesson to us that is “Do something which you absolutely love to do”. keep it up and Bear in mind;

    Sitaroon sy aagey jahan or b hain!Recommend

  • Sajid
    Apr 6, 2011 - 12:05PM

    Wonderful achievement and big salute for the hard work you have put in reaching this stage.Wish you many more successes ahead,and hope other will follow you.
    CheersRecommend

  • sapper_soil@yahoo.com
    Apr 6, 2011 - 6:33PM

    @Sherzad Ali Khan: Sherzad Ali Haider??? very sarcastic …anyway like ur style man, by the way it is surprising to note that the brother duo Shamsul Haq Qamar and Ehsanul Haq jan are very much missing, come on guys do not feel shy, appreciate the efforts of the little small girl it is a big achievement indeed, so what if she is not zondrei?Recommend

  • Apr 6, 2011 - 7:16PM

    Mr/Ms. Sapper_soil, didn’t you find any other platform to express your frustration? Your situation didn’t even allow you to reveal your identity. Recommend

  • Yasmin
    Apr 6, 2011 - 10:30PM

    Congratulation Rubina! keep it up, we all are proud of you. You are a very good example for others. Recommend

  • Apr 11, 2011 - 12:44PM

    Dear Rubina,
    I would like to congratulate you and your family to effort and this achievement.

    Best of luck for all of your future endeavors!
    Take care,

    Best Regard:

    Saeed Ahmed JeelaniRecommend

  • Apr 11, 2011 - 12:45PM

    Chitral. Appreciable! Bravo! No doubt, Pakistani women are playing an equal role as men in the long run of better society.Recommend

  • shareef khan
    Apr 11, 2011 - 7:39PM

    Good work Rubina.No matter you live abroad or here,you have already set an example of hard work for the other ladies of Pakistan who remain restricted in their homes thinking that they are ladies,they have financial constraints.they cant afford to work with gents or what ever..
    KudosRecommend

  • Amir Nayab
    Apr 14, 2011 - 2:53PM

    Congratulation to Ms Rubina Qadeem for such great struggle, wish you all the best in the future, we all are proud, this is the lesson for the women of the chitral.

    Amir Nayab
    The FirstMicroFinance Bank Ltd,
    Head Office Islamabad.

    University of Lahore Islamabad.Recommend

  • shehnaz johar
    Apr 15, 2011 - 12:38AM

    that’s what we called empowered in the true sense. such brilliant examples can truly bring women empowerment and change the mind set of the people. Recommend

  • Dr.zerish
    Apr 15, 2011 - 10:05PM

    @ benz
    whether rubina is frm chitral or any other district she is just a RUBY.. :)Recommend

  • Azaz Ahmad
    Apr 16, 2011 - 9:14AM

    Really amazing. u did make us proud with ur courage and determination.Recommend

  • Azaz Ahmad
    Apr 16, 2011 - 9:18AM

    Really amazing. you did make us proud with your courage and determination.Recommend

  • Apr 18, 2011 - 11:28PM

    well done Rubina congratulations .
    you made some difference in stereotypes about some specific jobs for women .I would loike to encourage all girls and women who poosess aspecial culture and restrictions from family also.There is no job which has been identified for women but we are the people who differentaite men and women .Women are as equal as men /boys .Gender segreagation at workplace also play an important role in your carrer development .
    so where ever you go and what ever you do ,set a goal for yopurself where do you want to see your self after 3 years ,then you will be successeded.Recommend

  • wasi
    Apr 20, 2011 - 10:57PM

    i bet 95% of the ppl who get scholarships are the one’s that dont really deserve them. Most of those who go abraod show them selves as belonging to underdeveloped and less previleged areas but infact they are notRecommend

  • Razia
    Apr 22, 2011 - 8:35PM

    Really appreciatale!!!we all are very proud of you…………Recommend

  • Apr 22, 2011 - 9:05PM

    I really appreciate this Chitrali girl who stepped down in the field of hoteling and want to prepare a complete ducomentry on her life kindly send me email and Contact of her as well as of writer
    Razia. thanxRecommend

  • Apr 22, 2011 - 9:11PM

    Can you send me your email ID for sharing some other informations of Chitrali girls I have so many stories like this one here being a Chitral based journalist I want to explore other people too. plz send me ur email IDRecommend

  • Qurban Ali
    May 15, 2011 - 10:39AM

    I am highly impressed happy and pray to Almighty Allah to grant you more, more and more strength to sustain the prosperity, courage and work as a symbol for revolution and mental change in our chitrali society….. kamyab rahee, shad rahee, abad rahee……….. boooooooooooo sheeeeeeeeeeely……………….. hamesh kamyab bos………….. hamesh zindagia taraqi koray………… ameeeeeeeeeeen @R. Khan: Recommend

  • May 21, 2011 - 10:12PM

    congratulation miss rubina i really proud of u god bless u always Recommend

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