United Nations peacekeepers commonly involved in 'transactional sex': UN study

The OIOS draft said 480 allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse had been made between 2008 and 2013


Reuters June 11, 2015
Missions in Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Haiti and South Sudan accounted for the largest numbers of accusations. DESIGN: FAIZAN DAWOOD

UNITED NATIONS: United Nations peacekeepers commonly pay for sex with cash, dresses, jewelry, perfume, cell phones and other items, despite a ban on such relationships with people the world body is trying to help, a draft UN report concluded.

The draft study by the UN Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS), obtained by Reuters on Wednesday, said surveys of hundreds of women in Haiti and Liberia found their reasons for selling sex included hunger, poverty and lifestyle improvement.

"Evidence from two peacekeeping mission countries demonstrates that transactional sex is quite common but underreported in peacekeeping missions," concluded the OIOS draft dated May 15.

The United Nations currently has more than 125,000 troops, police and civilians deployed in 16 operations around the world.

The OIOS draft report also noted that "the number of condoms distributed, along with the number of personnel undergoing voluntary counseling and confidential testing for HIV ... suggest that sexual relationships between peacekeeping personnel and the local population may be routine."

It said a UN bulletin issued in 2003 had banned transactional sex by peacekeepers, in part because it undercuts the organisation's credibility in areas where it is serving.

The OIOS draft said 480 allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse had been made between 2008 and 2013, of which a third involved children. It added that missions in Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Haiti and South Sudan accounted for the largest numbers of accusations. However, it noted that there were 51 allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse against UN peacekeepers in 2014, down from 66 in 2013.

States providing troops to UN missions are primary responsible for investigating allegations against their soldiers and police.

"Despite continuing reductions in reported allegations, that are partly explained by underreporting, effectiveness of enforcement against sexual exploitation and abuse is hindered by a complex architecture, prolonged delays, unknown and varying outcomes, and severely deficient victim assistance," OIOS said.

The draft included a response by the UN Departments of Peacekeeping Operations and Field Support. They regretted that OIOS did not evaluate prevention efforts and only focused on enforcement and remedial assistance efforts.

"This would have provided a much more complete view of the measures taken by the departments to address sexual exploitation and abuse," they said. They did not dispute that underreporting was a concern, but noted there had been a significant increase in deployment of peacekeepers over the past decade and a large decrease in sexual exploitation and abuse allegations.

"This picture also supports an analysis that strengthened efforts ... are having a positive impact," they said.

COMMENTS (3)

Iqbal Aftab | 6 years ago | Reply Incomplete Reporting. If have no freedom in writing then try to avoid such features, the writer lack the courage to names of the countries involved in such accusations. At least name the countries whose personnels are largely involved in sexual exploitation and abuses in peace missions. Such people are also widely involved in human trafficking. So a suggestion to the writer if you can't name the country / countries involved abstain from writing such inadequate articles with no proper comprehension of the topic.Inadequate Journalism.
Afzal | 6 years ago | Reply @Usman: You are right, particularly in non-transactional cases ...rapes!!
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