Qatar’s World Cup bid to be fully investigated

Corporate entities await inquiry of bribery allegations


Afp June 09, 2014
There are allegations that former Qatari football boss Mohamed bin Hammam paid millions of dollars in bribes to secure support for Qatar's deeply controversial victory in a 2010 Fifa vote. PHOTO: AFP

SEOUL: Fifa's Asian commercial partners said Monday they expected a ‘thorough investigation’ into corruption allegations over Qatar's 2022 World Cup bid, reflecting concerns that their multi-million dollar sponsorship deals might be tainted.

Analysts say official statements from some of football's biggest financial backers reveal the extent of corporate concern over the charges of bribes and backhanders.

After Adidas and Visa spoke out at the weekend, Fifa's two top-tier ‘partner’ sponsors in Asia, Hyundai and Sony, underlined the importance of an exhaustive enquiry.

"We are confident that Fifa is taking these allegations seriously and that the Investigatory Chamber of the Fifa Ethics Committee will conduct a thorough investigation," the South Korean carmaker said.

"Hyundai Motor supports football as a sport that brings people together all over the world and firmly believes the World Cup is the ideal platform to fulfil this objective."

Sony had a similar reaction to the allegations that former Qatari football boss Mohamed bin Hammam paid millions of dollars in bribes to secure support for Qatar's deeply controversial victory in a 2010 Fifa vote.

"We expect these allegations to be investigated appropriately, and we continue to expect Fifa to adhere to its principles of integrity, ethics and fair play across all aspects of its operations," the Japanese electronics giant said.

The tone was mild, but Fifa's corporate backers rarely speak out and the fact that they issued statements at all pointed, analysts said, to the level of concern.

Adidas said Sunday it was confident that the matter was being dealt with ‘as a priority,’ while Visa said it would continue to monitor the internal Fifa investigation.

Fifa investigator Michael Garcia, a former US federal prosecutor, is to finish his inquiry into the 2018 and 2022 World Cup votes on Tuesday. But his report is not expected until mid-July, when the World Cup finals finish.

British newspaper The Sunday Times has said it has obtained millions of emails, documents and bank transfers showing that bin Hammam paid over $5 million to win support in the bidding process.

The Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy insists that it won the bid ‘on its merits’.

A spokesman for another major World Cup sponsor in Asia, Yingli Solar of China, said it had no immediate comment on the corruption allegations.

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