Hague summit: Nawaz makes case for civil nuclear energy

By APP
Published: March 25, 2014
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PM Nawaz speaks with President Obama during The Hague summit. PHOTO: AFP

PM Nawaz speaks with President Obama during The Hague summit. PHOTO: AFP

THE HAGUE: 

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif appealed on Monday for international cooperation and assistance that will give his country access to nuclear technology for a civilian energy programme — the lynchpin of its strategy to overcome chronic energy shortages.

“Energy deficit is one of the most serious crises facing Pakistan,” PM Nawaz told delegates at the third Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague. “As we revive our economy, we look forward to international cooperation and assistance for nuclear energy under IAEA safeguards,” he said.

Leaders from 53 countries, US, EU, International Atomic Energy Agency and Interpol are attending the nuclear summit.

The prime minister also called for Pakistan’s inclusion in all international export control regimes, especially the Nuclear Suppliers Group. International treaties and forums, according to him, should supplement national actions to fortify nuclear security.

At the same time he reiterated “the highest importance” that his country attached to nuclear security. because it was directly linked to the country’s national security.

“Pakistan is a responsible nuclear weapons state and pursues a policy of nuclear restraint, as well as credible minimum deterrence,” he said.

“Our region needs peace and stability for economic development that benefits its people. That is why, I strongly advocate nuclear restraint, balance in conventional forces and ways to resolve conflicts,” the prime minister said.

The prime minister paid tribute to US President Barack Obama for launching the nuclear security summit process four years ago. Pakistan has been running a safe, secure and safeguarded civil nuclear programme for more than 40 years and the country has the expertise, manpower and infrastructure to produce civil nuclear energy.

Eminently qualified

Pakistan’s nuclear security is supported by five pillars – a strong command and control system led by the National Command Authority; an integrated intelligence system; a rigorous regulatory regime; a comprehensive export control regime; and active international cooperation. Pakistan’s security regime covers physical protection, material control and accounting, border controls and radiological emergencies.

Pakistan is a party to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and worked closely with the IAEA to deal with safety and security of radioactive sources and illicit trafficking of nuclear materials.

The prime minister said Pakistan regularly submitted reports to the UN Security Council 1540 Committee on the measures the country has taken to exercise control over transfer of sensitive materials and technologies.

“Looking back, we can say with confidence that our decisions and commitments have spurred national action, promoted international cooperation and fostered nuclear security culture,” the prime minister said, adding that Pakistan has constructively contributed to this process.

He said Pakistan’s nuclear materials, facilities and assets were safe and secure and the country’s nuclear security regime was anchored in the principle of multi-layered defence for the entire spectrum – insider, outsider or cyber threat.

Islamabad has established a centre of excellence that conducts intense specialised courses in nuclear security, physical protection and personnel reliability, he said, adding that Pakistan was ready to share its best practices and training facilities with other interested states in the region and beyond.

Dealing with radiological threats

He said his country had also deployed radiation detection mechanisms at several exit and entry points to prevent illicit trafficking of radioactive and nuclear materials.

Similarly, he said, all countries should continue to take measures to secure their nuclear facilities and materials and prevent any perceived nuclear terrorist threat. “We all need radioactive sources for hospitals, industry and research; but should be vigilant about radiological threats,” he added.

Published in The Express Tribune, March 25th, 2014.

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Reader Comments (29)

  • Mar 25, 2014 - 2:46AM

    one must understand that in this day and age, global partnerships have a time dimension. not necessary those who are friends today will remain tomorrow and vice versa

    Recommend

  • AnisAqeel
    Mar 25, 2014 - 3:15AM

    Pakistan is qualified for receiving civilian nuclear energy program as it has proven to be responsible in this crucial matter but on the other hand it is utmost important to be honest partner that can be trusted. We must rid off all those policies that has brought us mistrust, defamed and reduced to a notorious state but surely that can be changed to countries like S Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Turkey and that kind. Fanaticism do not have any place along with progress and prosperity and religion or edict must not be traded for material benefits so widely.

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  • Maria
    Mar 25, 2014 - 4:08AM

    There is a lot of hypocrisy in the world when India is given a civilian nuclear deal when India is the nation which first exploded a nuclear bomb in the region and started the nuclear arms race in South Asia. This is even more disturbing when you think that the Indians took civilian nuclear aid given for peaceful purposes by Canada – the Candu reactor – and diverted its use to make weapons and make a nuclear bomb. If India can rewrite things, so can Pakistan. Pakistan has genuine need to overcome energy shortages that were ignored by dictators and politicians the last 10 years. So now would be a good time to forge ahead with a peaceful nuclear deal.

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  • sabi
    Mar 25, 2014 - 4:10AM

    Mr prime minister what you say is correct but tell us how safe is our GHQ-If it goes into rebel control nuclear assets will automatically go under their control.

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  • Takoo
    Mar 25, 2014 - 5:25AM

    Do you all see that big stick in Obama’s hand??

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  • 2*2
    Mar 25, 2014 - 6:37AM

    Photo caption: Speak softly, but carry a big stick

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  • Professor
    Mar 25, 2014 - 7:07AM

    Nawaz’s claim as a “responsible nuclear weapons state” will certainly raise a few eyebrows. I don’t think Qadeer Khan’s escapades has been forgotten.

    Recommend

  • Shafiq Rehman
    Mar 25, 2014 - 8:11AM

    Can’t wait for funny catptions on this picture all over facebook and twitter. Don’t even try here, they will be censored by ET :D

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  • Unknown
    Mar 25, 2014 - 8:29AM

    A Picture Speaks Louder Than Thousand Words :)

    True relationship between America and Pakistan is shown in this picture.

    Recommend

  • Ash
    Mar 25, 2014 - 8:42AM

    “He said his country had also deployed radiation detection mechanisms at several exit and entry points to prevent illicit trafficking of radioactive and nuclear materials.”
    And what about the rogue “radioactive-minds” that have been spreading the techniology across the globe? What kind of checks you have deployed for them Mr. PM?

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  • Char Latan
    Mar 25, 2014 - 9:01AM

    The photo shows Obama offering Sharif a scroll containing a nuclear deal, a guarantee to intervene in Kashmir and a best friends forever badge. Either that or it was a giant lollipop.

    Recommend

  • Rasikh
    Mar 25, 2014 - 9:04AM

    The Picture:
    “How about a magic trick? I’m gonna make this pencil disappear. Ta-dah! It’s, it’s gone.”

    Recommend

  • Umar
    Mar 25, 2014 - 9:13AM

    Why is he showing the Danda to our PM?

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  • Wali
    Mar 25, 2014 - 9:52AM

    Like the photo….. looks like a stick in Obama’s hand!

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  • Mobeen
    Mar 25, 2014 - 10:12AM

    Pakistan is an energy-deficient country, and thus need a non-discriminatory, criteria-based approach to access nuclear technology. Pakistan must be given equal rights and responsibilities in this regard, as its experience in the nuclear power programme provided an auspicious environment to further develop nuclear power generation capacity.
    Energy security, the ability of a nation to secure sustainable energy supplies to meet its energy needs at reasonable prices, has become a major energy policy imperative. If India can be accommodated in the nuclear energy market despite not agreeing to accede to the non-proliferation treaty, and given a waiver to trade by the Nuclear Suppliers Group, Pakistan should not be an exception.

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  • champu
    Mar 25, 2014 - 10:21AM

    @Wali ,
    It is a carrot colored stick.

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  • Munir Ahmed
    Mar 25, 2014 - 10:29AM

    @sabi: I believe this is more related to talibanization within army.

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  • Professor
    Mar 25, 2014 - 10:30AM

    @Wali:
    Maybe it is part of the carrot and stick policy.

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  • Usman
    Mar 25, 2014 - 10:31AM

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) also recently declared the nuclear program of Pakistan as safe and secure and appreciated the obvious dedication to the safety and security of the regulators as well of operators. Also we have improved our position in recent NTI report which shows our dedication we attach to the nuclear assets. All we need is to let down our energy dilemma which can be solved by having civil nuclear technology deals from powers like US.

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  • Tabish Bilgrami
    Mar 25, 2014 - 10:39AM

    The picture is awesome.. Hahahahahahahahahaha

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  • Hurmuth
    Mar 25, 2014 - 10:48AM

    Apart from nukes, nuclear technology is widely been used for civilian use power generation across the globe in order to meet the increased energy needs. Pakistan faces a strident energy crisis at its homeland which gives an offshoot to multiple socio economic dilemmas. At the NSS 2014, Pakistan makes a very coherent case of opting nuclear energy to get rid of the power outrage. The existing available energy resources are not sufficient to meet with the pace of energy demands which left a big vacuum in shape of lack of supply. That is the major aim that Pakistan is on a joint venture of building nuclear power plants with China. It also welcomes any kind of energy cooperation from the international community. But this is categorically very clear that Pakistan is doing everything under the parameters drawn by IAEA safeguards.

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  • Haniya
    Mar 25, 2014 - 1:29PM

    Apart from nukes, nuclear technology is widely been used for civilian use power generation across the globe in order to meet the increased energy needs. Pakistan faces a strident energy crisis at its homeland which gives an offshoot to multiple socio economic dilemmas. At the NSS 2014, Pakistan makes a very coherent case of opting nuclear energy to get rid of the power outrage. The existing available energy resources are not sufficient to meet with the pace of energy demands which left a big vacuum in shape of lack of supply. That is the major aim that Pakistan is on a joint venture of building nuclear power plants with China. It also welcomes any kind of energy cooperation from the international community. But this is categorically very clear that Pakistan is doing everything under the parameters drawn by IAEA safeguards.

    Recommend

  • unbelievable
    Mar 25, 2014 - 4:39PM

    Another example of Pakistan’s famous collective amnesia — anyone remember that your national hero sold nuke technology to N Korea, Iran and Libya? It’s easy to say politically correct things — harder to actually do them.

    Recommend

  • Raj - USA
    Mar 25, 2014 - 7:35PM

    The issues of Pakistan’s eligibility for nuclear technology and not just nuclear technology but also any other advanced technology that can be misused is examined from many angles. The structure of the country, the mental make-up of its population ranks far higher than anything in making such determinations. No one will tell you openly, but what they always factor in their minds are:
    (1) The daily rate of killings for religious cause and particularly the brutal ways of beheadings.
    (2) Kidnappings and rape to convert practices widely practiced by the general population, the support and justification these practices enjoy from the judiciary, law makers law enforcers and religious clerics and to top it, the support almost all its population render to these activities through their silence and deflections and inactions to probe any of these events.
    (3) The bombings and destructions of places of worship of all religions, particularly those of minorities. The inaction of the government, its agencies and importantly the silence from the majority on such issues.
    (4) The tendency and practice to view, discuss and determine anything under the sun in the light of sharia, be it child marriage, multiple marriage, educational curriculum, sports, arts, entertainment, etc.

    The world is far wiser now. The mental make up of the masses in the country, rather than just the government is taken into consideration. determinations on parity and equality are made on the basis of sanity and values the population reflects. After all it is the mass majority of its population that reflects the ethics and moral values of the country, and it is only these that shall be making, implement and enforce laws.

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  • Raj - USA
    Mar 25, 2014 - 8:33PM

    India also proliferated nuclear technology by diverting nuclear material from Canadian reactor. However, India proliferated for getting the technology for its own. This is vastly different from Pakistan’s proliferation for a religious cause. The world understands this and makes a clear distinction. The world community has now become more aware and wiser. It studies the mental make up of the population not just the stated intentions. Who makes the laws, how the laws are made and enforced, the ethics and principles the country follows are more important in making a determination. The mental make up and thinking of Pakistanis is seen in the view of the conversions, killings on religious lines, destruction of places of worship, the debate on laws such as child marriages and multiple marriages, the enactment of its laws, the Constitution, school curriculum, etc. It is these factors that determine if the technology transferred would be put to good use or bad use and justified on religious grounds.

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  • yasir
    Mar 25, 2014 - 10:32PM

    Today, Pakistan has become one of the hardest hit victims of terrorism and extremism. Nearly 3,000 Pakistani troops have been killed fighting insurgents. Pakistan is working closely with the international community to eradicate the menace of terrorism and extremism from its soil. That’s why it has taken preemptive steps to counter terrorism. But irony lie in the fact that International community is reluctant to assist Pakistan in energy sector. Recommend

  • unbelievable
    Mar 26, 2014 - 2:35AM

    @Maria:

    There is a lot of hypocrisy in the
    world when India is given a civilian
    nuclear deal when India is the nation
    which first exploded a nuclear bomb in
    the region and started the nuclear
    arms race in South Asia.

    As I recall China was the first to test nuclear weapon – ten years before India. Further – India has never been implicated in nuclear proliferation, never been associated with Worldwide terrorism, and has never been mentioned in articles talking about possible failed nations.

    Recommend

  • Adams Brown
    Mar 26, 2014 - 4:53AM

    US has admitted the security and safety of Pakistan’s nuclear program is impregnable, Pakistan scored the most improved security measures in NTI index. It’s strict export control measures makes the nuclear trade a more secure line. Record of using the nuclear technology in revolutionizing the science field in agriculture, medicine, water distribution and power generation. Pakistan has become the suitable country to be included in the Nuclear supplier group (NSG).

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  • JSM
    Mar 26, 2014 - 11:01PM

    From where did North Korea and Libya get nuclear weapon knowhow?Recommend

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