On strike: IIUI students bring activities to standstill

Demand additional courses, first half of BA LLB degree.


Our Correspondent October 23, 2013
Demand additional courses, first half of BA LLB degree. PHOTO: FILE

ISLAMABAD:


Students of the International Islamic University’s Sharia and Law faculty on Tuesday brought educational activities to a standstill, barring the entry of teachers and staff members. Over 60 students of the department from the 2010 batch demanded two additional courses for the new semester and the issuance of bachelors of arts (BA) degree.


The BA LLB in Sharia and Law comprises two years for a BA degree and then three years for LLB. The students have completed the first two years and are demanding their BA degree.



“It is ironic that they are demanding a part of the degree before the completion of the entire degree,” said an official of the Sharia and Law department.

The university’s buses which usually pick students and faculty in the morning were not allowed to move and even vehicles entering the premises were blocked by the students.

“We want 10 courses for the ongoing semester while the varsity is offering eight, what is the big deal,” said one of the students participating in the strike.

Many students who were not part of the protests could not attend classes while the number of staffers also remained low as the majority come by bus.



The strike continued till the afternoon when a meeting of the heads of all departments and deans was called with the protesting students.

“It was decided that the issue of getting the BA degree could be resolved but the demand for additional courses will be discussed in the academic council in the next few days,” said a member of the meeting.

Later, the protesting students dispersed and traffic was allowed to move in and out of the hospital.

Published in The Express Tribune, October 23rd, 2013.

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