Media ethics: ‘Lack of resources, training compromise quality journalism’

Pakistan remains one of the more difficult countries to work in, says Danish ambassador.


Our Correspondent September 20, 2013
“According to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), seven journalists were killed in Pakistan in 2012, making Pakistan one of the riskiest countries for members of the press,” says Danish Ambassador. PHOTO: FILE

ISLAMABAD:


National and international media persons have deplored that Pakistan lacked training centres, resources and had hostile environment for journalists, which was compromising quality journalism.


They were speaking at the third International Media Ethics Day (IMED), organised by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with Coalition for Ethical Journalism and the Center for International Media Ethics.

“The highest priority for the media today is to produce quality journalism. Today, we celebrate the importance of truth, humanity and responsibility in the way we communicate and tell our stories. Our ethics are the key to peace, democracy and tolerance and that’s what we fight for every day,” said Aidan White, the London-based director of the Ethical Journalism Network, who joined through Skype.

CIME Ambassador to Pakistan Puruesh Chaudhary said: “Our challenges are not only complicated but also complex in nature, therefore, the work of journalism demands proactive approach towards creating ethical content in public interest.”

Danish Ambassador to Pakistan, Jesper Sorensen talked about the Danish International Development Agency’s contribution for an open and pluralistic media in Pakistan. “Among the
key priority areas in assistance are the promotion of freedom of expression, democracy and respect for human right,” he said

He said that Pakistan remains one of the more difficult countries to work in - due to many factors, including militancy.

“According to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), seven journalists were killed in Pakistan in 2012, making Pakistan one of the riskiest countries for members of the press,” he said.

He said according to statistics, Pakistan has 252 daily, 130 weekly, and 279 monthly news publications.

“That is actually impressive and so is the circulation of newspapers,” he said.

Charmaine Anderson from Internews Network expressed her dissatisfaction over the way journalists in Pakistan covered a plane crash incident that took place last year.

Published in The Express Tribune, September 21st, 2013. 

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