Poetic art woos visitors at Jumma Hafta Bazaar

Exhibition allows art admirers, students to view and purchase intricate paintings and pottery among other things.


The exhibition allows art admirers and students to view and purchase intricate paintings, pottery, sketches, and traditional shawls and dresses. PHOTOS: AYESHA MIR/EXPRESS

KARACHI:


If you are looking for some traditional decorative items for your house, or a block-print shalwar kameez for Eid, you may want to check out the works of over 30 different artists all the way from Hala, Hyderabad and Bhit Shah.


Their works are on display at The Second Floor cafe’s Jumma Hafta Art Bazaar, which ends today. The exhibition allows art admirers, students and art collectors to view and purchase intricate paintings, pottery, sketches, and traditional Sindhi shawls and dresses.


The exhibition allows art admirers and students to view and purchase intricate paintings, pottery, sketches, and traditional shawls and dresses. PHOTOS: AYESHA MIR/EXPRESS

Apart from Hala’s blue pottery and Bhitt Shah’s naturally dyed Ajrak, kurtas and dupattas, you can also purchase the “common problems” of Karachi. Aliya Yousuf, a teacher at the Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture, who uses wood as a medium of expression to display the city’s problems quite creatively. “People like to purchase these problems for their drawing rooms,” she said, smiling at the irony. “It is a replica of traditional artworks.”

Tahir Bhatti draws a sketch within 15 minutes. “Art reflects peace and tranquility. Such exhibitions rarely take place in Pakistan, and when they do, they tell the whole story of what is happening in our society,” he added.


The exhibition allows art admirers and students to view and purchase intricate paintings, pottery, sketches, and traditional shawls and dresses. PHOTOS: AYESHA MIR/EXPRESS

An empty room titled ‘in memoriam’ is a unique artwork of Minelle Gaya. “It is a different kind of art. It is a new concept in Pakistan. Only art lovers can understand it,” she explained. Gaya is a graduate from NCA, Lahore. She says she gets the least attention for her work as visitors pass by randomly without inquiring about her creation. “This work doesn’t get noticed at the first sight,” she added.

The T2F had also invited Hyderabad’s Dilshad, an expert in making unique kind of bangles, at the exhibition. “The visitors at such exhibitions know the value of these bangles. I don’t sell my work at shops regularly,” Dilshad told The Express Tribune.

Khuda Dino Arbab from Hala is also invited for the first time at the T2F’s Jumma Hafta Art Bazaar. He makes decoration pieces in his native town. “I see my work being valued at such events. Common people can’t afford it and they don’t even purchase these items for their home,” Arbab said.



Syed Ali Raza Shah, a visitor who stopped at Majeed Soomro’s stall, said: “People in urban areas have adopted traditional dresses. It’s a good omen and I think the government should encourage the industry as it has great potential.” He said that he made dyes with the roots and leaves of different trees. “They are natural colours. No one will find such dresses anywhere.”



Soomro’s small stall was overflowing with dresses. “The black and maroons are some of my favourites. Thanks to the T2F for making my dream come true,” said Afifa, a customer at Soomro’s stall.



“I’ll show these things to my family members and friends living abroad and will tell them how these things are made in Sindh,” said another admirer.

Published in The Express Tribune, June 29th, 2013.

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