Guilty Until Innocent?: Pakistani-American charged with aiding suicide bomber

Prosec­utors allege Raez Qadir Khan assist­ed in the May 27, 2009 blast at ISI headqu­arters in Lahore.


Afp March 07, 2013
PHOTO: REUTERS/ FILE

WASHINGTON:


A Pakistan-born US citizen in Portland, Oregon was charged  on Tuesday with helping one of three suicide bombers in a 2009 attack in Pakistan that killed 30 people and injured 300 more, the Justice Department said.


Reaz Qadir Khan, 48, could face life in prison if he is found guilty of the charges of “conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists”. He was arrested on Tuesday without incident at his Portland home, before later appearing in court to hear the charges against him, a statement said.

Prosecutors allege Khan assisted an individual named Ali Jaleel, who died while participating in the May 27, 2009 blast at the ISI headquarters in Lahore.

According to the indictment, Khan provided Jaleel, who comes from the Maldives, and his family with “advice and financial assistance.” The assistance continued after Jaleel’s death.

That aid included paying for Jaleel to attend a terrorist training camp and advice on how to escape detection, all the while knowing
the assistance “would be used in a conspiracy to kill, maim or kidnap persons abroad.”

Published in The Express Tribune, March 7th, 2013.

COMMENTS (1)

gp65 | 8 years ago | Reply

"Guilty Until Innocent?: Pakistani-American charged with aiding suicide bomber"

You clearly do not know how law and order machinery works in USA. People believed to have committed a crime are charged with the crime but they are presumed innocent until the crime is proved.

Charging someone does not mean that the government has gone back on the Innocent until proven guilty paradigm. How else would anyone ever get proven guilty if they were not charged to begin with?

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