My patriarchy is better than yours

Published: January 17, 2013
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The writer is a Karachi-based journalist leading the South Asia team for Berlin-based news agency, Associated Reporters Abroad. She blogs under www.thiskarachilife.wordpress.com and tweets @haniyousuf

The writer is a Karachi-based journalist leading the South Asia team for Berlin-based news agency, Associated Reporters Abroad. She blogs under www.thiskarachilife.wordpress.com and tweets @haniyousuf

Someone told me last week I left Berlin because of the men. Quite right. As a Pakistani woman, who lived here most of the life, I am expected to be used to sexism and patriarchy. I am not. At least not the kind I experienced in Germany.

I started working in Pakistan at age 19. I worked at schools and NGOs trying to figure out what I wanted to do, before an internship made a journalist out of me. I was always considered an intelligent, serious woman. And, I was taken as seriously as a woman in her mid twenties, just starting a career could expect to be taken.

In Germany, as an older woman, armed with a master’s degree from a top-ranked journalism school, fluent in two and half, now three, languages and highly-developed networking skills, I was reduced to a floozy. It came as a shock and it took me a while to get used to it and over it.

I won a fellowship awarded by the Columbia University and Axel Springer Akademie. Axel Springer is a major European media conglomerate with a political stance generally considered conservative. I worked at the foreign desk of Die Welt, their “quality” newspaper. They also publish Die Bild, a highly successful tabloid, popular for first-page photos of topless women. Recently, though, for Women’s Day, they pushed these photos further into the newspaper.

Die Welt surprised me because there were so few women at the desks there. The women who were there seemed to fade into the background. My experience in journalism in Pakistan was very different. I remembered it being populated by women. I wrote about this and was, surprisingly, published. This is free speech, I thought. Not quite. A few weeks later the paper ran another op-ed, questioning the veracity of what I was saying. And, talking about how emancipated German women were because they paid for their own meals on dates and opened their own doors. It was this skewed notion of feminism I often encountered in Germany.

And, the day after my op-ed was printed, the editor of the paper, a man of course, referred to me as the “privileged woman from the country of 180 million suppressed women”. His wife said that, he said. I found it hilarious to be called “privileged” by the white male, but I suppose I have something he never will have, exotic female privilege. Sarcasm absolutely intended.

Exotic Female Privilege, which I’ll refer to as EFP from now on, sucks. As the exotic woman, I was never really taken seriously by male journalists in Germany. If my work spoke for itself, I was taken partially seriously. I got sick of personal compliments given by senior correspondents at the paper. I also got sick of the sleazy looks. I once mentioned trying to get an invitation to an event to a senior colleague who pointed suggestively to another quite senior editor and said he would be happy to take me. And, while his regular type was blond, he was sure he would make an exception for me. And, this is just one of the many incidents, I experienced.

And, you could not call this sexual discrimination. Friends and colleagues I mentioned this to, said it was perhaps my demeanour, a vibe I gave off, or the way I dressed. Some said this was no big deal and happened everywhere. Still others said that I should use it for my personal gain. Call me an idealist or an idiot, I couldn’t handle it.

I wasn’t treated like this anywhere else in the world. As an ambitious woman who gets a kick out of meeting people, networking and socialising, I cold email and cold call people most places in the world, including Pakistan. I cold emailed a bunch of older journalists in London, right after my fellowship was over. All of them invited me into their office, looked at my CV and gave me advice. It was a tough industry and the chances of an edit job in London seemed slim.

I went back to Berlin and cold emailed some more. One senior male journalist from Hamburg emailed me every time he was in Berlin. By some stroke of luck I was always out of town, but I was quite excited to meet him and talk about his work, which involved the drone war in Pakistan. The one time I was in Berlin, he wanted to meet after hours, at 10 pm, both times. I suggested a 3 pm coffee and never heard from him again. Again, just another of many incidents.

Because of my engagement with the issue, I was asked to give the key-note speech at the launch of an admirable organisation. Pro Quote is asking for a 30 per cent women in leading positions in German newsrooms. Here, I befriended the likes of Annette Bruhns and Dagmar Engel, top women in German journalism. I heard inside stories of what goes on at respectable magazines like Der Spiegel and Die Zeit. Someone, who was a senior editor at Der Spiegel told me about how one of her ex bosses referred to women by the crass German word for ‘vagina’. People in Germany love to bitch about Axel Springer, the company the daily, Die Welt, belonged to. Springer was the “kleine, or little, Murdoch” and, therefore, subject to abuse all over the country. It’s not like this anywhere else in Germany, I was told. That wasn’t my experience. In fact, the editor at the foreign desk at Die Welt was extremely supportive, even if there were others who weren’t. And, I experienced this kind of behaviour at left-wing newspapers as well.

A friend of mine, an American Pakistani was going to language school as part of a prestigious German-American cultural exchange fellowship. His language teacher, he told me, said that in Germany you need to make a choice: you can either be a smart woman or a pretty woman. In Pakistan, not so much. I walked through the offices full of women at the Express Tribune a few weeks ago. Granted it is exceptional and it’s only the privileged English-language press that has that privilege. And, I don’t deny that the patriarchy here is disgusting and repressive. And, that mass and institutional sexism has destroyed many women. But, in any case, a career as a woman journalist is just plain easier for me in Pakistan than in Germany.

Published in The Express Tribune, January 18th, 2013.

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Reader Comments (51)

  • John B
    Jan 17, 2013 - 11:57PM

    Am I the one who sees through her writing why she failed in Germany?

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  • Fauzia Bin Al-Waleed
    Jan 18, 2013 - 12:03AM

    Oh, come on now! Comparing the status of women in Pakistan and Germany is just ridiculous. German women are educated, emancipated, demand equal pay, go to work, are not subservient to their husbands, own lots of property, etc etc. Pakistani women – mostly the opposite. Writing an entire story based on the narrow experience of one (that is you) does not bode well for your future as journalist. Please pick another one (astrologer?).

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  • Shamsher Awan
    Jan 18, 2013 - 12:20AM

    Das kann doch nur ein Witz sein oder??. Madam since i spent enough of my time in the past In Germany I can safely see you have no idea about the German Culture and you have grossly misinterpreted almost everything. There is no workplace discrimination of any kind here and infact Women are more appreciated than men. Population of women in Officers does not equate to freedom of Women!! Also you mention Girls on dates pay from their own pockets and it is not any disrespect but it is a culture. May be you find it rude on your date but that is they way it is. Infact if you will invite someone on a dinner table then it does not mean you have to pay for them. Even in all traditional German weddings I have attended we have to pay and in my last wedding attendance near Weimar Germany I paid 50 Euros on my friend’s wedding. Secondly I worked a lot with Germans and there is no way i concur with any of Your Arguments.
    Your interpretation of Germany is really faulty and i advice you to spent some more time in some Small German town rather than in Bigger city to experience the true German culture as in Bigger cities like Frankfurt, Berlin etc sometimes it seems True Germans are non Existent or now in a minority compared to states like Bayern and Thuringen.Recommend

  • Falcon
    Jan 18, 2013 - 12:42AM

    Very interesting insider view of journalistic world in Germany.

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  • Toba Alu
    Jan 18, 2013 - 12:46AM

    Being an Exotic Male Privileged for the largest part of my adult working life I can assure you it sucks too. Do not get me wrong it is a lousy experience and I feel sorry for you. At least in Germany there is a law for the protection against harassment since 1994.though it it is not very effective. You should have made use of it. They cannot get away with it that easy. Btw I think you should rather use sexual harassment rather than patriarchy.

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  • kanwal
    Jan 18, 2013 - 12:51AM

    @author
    I respect your hard work and dare to write this peice. I so far have had no issues with my german collegues other than the sleazy looks sometimes. Same is true for French work mates. The best ones i found were the British i think. Even better, the British Indians (interesting, is nt it?).
    Yet the Pakistani collegues have always been no worse than them. And its quite surprising. I think it also verifies your relevant findings.

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  • Saleem
    Jan 18, 2013 - 1:05AM

    So tell me how many women were murdered in Germany in the lat ten years in the name of honour. How many women had their faces burnt with acid. How many women were made to parade naked in German villages. How many young girls were married forcibly against their will.
    Perhaps living and working in land of pure for a few years will put things in perspective for you.

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  • Pakistan is Da Bomb
    Jan 18, 2013 - 1:07AM

    Brilliant comparison of sexism in German and Pakistani societies. East or West, Pakistan is da Best!!

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  • Majid Urrehman
    Jan 18, 2013 - 1:18AM

    What is this? You have denied your own point which you established in the article in these ending lines? “And, I don’t deny that the patriarchy here is disgusting and repressive. And, that mass and institutional sexism has destroyed many women. But, in any case, a career as a woman journalist is just plain easier for me in Pakistan than in Germany.”
    Nevertheless, although I have been to Germany always whenever I went to Europe but I highly believe that the female in these countries are not considered anything else then a sex machine.

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  • S
    Jan 18, 2013 - 1:33AM

    I read your blog and this post, and the reason why you failed is because you’re not really good at writing. Going to Columbia doesn’t make you a writer

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  • media
    Jan 18, 2013 - 2:16AM

    Having read it, I now know why she failed abroad and became star at home.

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  • Watan dost
    Jan 18, 2013 - 4:43AM

    She is right, after living in germany for the last 7 years I can assure you that German culture is very inward looking, they literally do not take any interest in foreign people and their culture. They are mostly reserved , cold and quite a bit arrogant. But I have also understood the reason behind it in last 7 years, and the reason is that german culture is driven only by scientific logic and there is literally no place for any collective behaviour based on emotions. In germany people look at things as either Black or white and there is no room for any grey area in between. It is a country where each and every aspect of life is based upon 2+2=4. The behavior of Germans resemble so much to one another that sometimes it feels like they are carbon copies of each other, they look like a programmed disciplined nation which has no compatible anywhere else in the world.

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  • adam
    Jan 18, 2013 - 6:18AM

    I would agree to an extent there. If you want to be taken seriously as a working woman in a higher position, you need to be seen to be a bit aggressive and dominating (need to be more male-like).
    As someone said, Germans tend to think in white and black, rather than shades. So they will either see a woman as someone to flirt with or someone who is very independent and ‘fights the world’. There is nothing in between. They like to categorise things into air tight boxes which they understand.

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  • Usman
    Jan 18, 2013 - 7:18AM

    Is it a bird?

    Is it a plane? …..

    No….

    It’s Sour Grapes

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  • Ahmed
    Jan 18, 2013 - 7:23AM

    You never start your sentences with “And” if you want to succeed in any career, let alone in journalism, no matter what gender you belong to.

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  • Sirri Paey or Parathay
    Jan 18, 2013 - 8:43AM

    @John B Well I made the same Assumption after reading this article. ET is very generous indeed more than Die Welt and Die Bild. Also i find some self styled flattery in the start as well. Also i want to add that in Germany it is not your degree that matters like Pakistan but it is your skills like my Boss have lowest grades in university but he is the most intelligent person you can found in the world.

    @Shamsher Awan I definitely agree with you on all accounts. I am a Pakistani living in Germany and i know Germans Equate performance to Everything and Give the performance and get the respect and that is simple .Germans are Human form of robots and just like Futurama cartoons Germans are programmed with everything and believe me even among themselves they are like that and also i love to work with them because of their workplace ethics.

    @Watan dost I agree with you. But I must say that they achieved a lot in this world now they have some right to be arrogant and after achievement there is nothing wrong in it. But since i have many German friends believe me you cannot compare a German with anyone in the world. They are on time always, 99 percent Germans will speak truth, you will find them
    following the same routine everyday and from their breakfast to everything they have some way of life and they will follow it until the end of their life.

    But since my German skills Are pretty good I would advise every Pakistani that kindly learn German language as without German language you cannot live in Germany. Germans are a great nation and every great nation loves their language and culture. Also on a longer run if you want to live in Germany then Integrate and everything will be fine and you will be welcomed everywhere.Recommend

  • Ali Kazmi
    Jan 18, 2013 - 8:47AM

    “I found it hilarious to be called privileged by the white male.”

    Don’t you think your whininess and your ridiculous sense of entitlement got in the way of you being likeable? After having read your article, I guess it’s safe to presume you act like a very snooty brown female victim. Why do Pakistani feminists do that? Do they play the victim card to validate their inferiority complex?

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  • Jan 18, 2013 - 11:36AM

    Would you prefer the patriarchy that protects women from singing and dancing at weddings? Opening doors and paying during dates was what you found skewed? I predict you will soon discover islam and we will see you sporting a scart and then hijab. And then you will be totally emancipated because men will look at you with respect. People like you offer fodder to apologists for the hijab, 4 marriages etc saying that women in pakistan are better off than women in germany. It is sad that you do not see feminism as a set of laws that does not discriminate – you do not see feminism that aims to make you a person – not someone to be protected from restaurant bills.

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  • Ghani
    Jan 18, 2013 - 12:47PM

    its strange that no one accepted you in England or Germany, ever wonder if its something to do with you? :) Look inward, my friend.

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  • abhi
    Jan 18, 2013 - 1:12PM

    I think you were not able to adjust to their culture.
    A woman is heading Germany and unlike India or pakistan she is not from a ruling family. It would not have been possible if the environment was as tough for femals as you mentioned.

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  • Palvasha von Hassell
    Jan 18, 2013 - 2:27PM

    Hani, you are a 100% right. With very rare exceptions, people make it a trial living here. Enjoy your time in Karachi!

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  • Adnan
    Jan 18, 2013 - 2:37PM

    I must say that every one has different experience of life. Writer has candid opinion about western society about partiarchy which she experienced. there are dark areas in every societies. Based on this fact we should not always malign our soceity only.

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  • Palvasha von Hassell
    Jan 18, 2013 - 2:51PM

    Hani, you are 100% right. With very few exceptions, people make living here a real trial. Enjoy your time in Karachi!

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  • Nobody
    Jan 18, 2013 - 2:55PM

    @Majid Urrehman:
    If your last sentence is true, then I’m sorry but you’ve been hanging around the wrong people. i’ve never ever experienced any sort of sexism in any country in Europe or in North America. The middle east and Pakistan, completely different feeling.

    @author:
    Unfortunate experience. And quite surprising to be honest; 30 years ago, maybe not so surprising, at least based on all that I’ve read and the slightly older women I’ve spoken to. But for that to happen in the 21st century in a developed country…sounds like you had the misfortune of being around chauvinistic, insecure idiots living in the past. Always one or two of those morons around.

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  • Palvasha von Hassell
    Jan 18, 2013 - 3:07PM

    @Shamsher Awan:

    I’m not surprised you find it ok here…you happen not to be a senstive, independently-minded intellectual woman!

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  • Parvez
    Jan 18, 2013 - 3:08PM

    Journalistic ability, intelligence, female charm, etc on one side, all balanced by personel issues on the other…………………difficult balancing act.

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  • joy
    Jan 18, 2013 - 3:26PM

    author……………………too much of I in ur blog

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  • Sana Mir
    Jan 18, 2013 - 3:38PM

    @Palvasha von Hassell Kindly dont misled the people here. Germany is not as bad as you want to portray If you dont like Europe then kindly leave Europe for Greener and Respectable pastures like Pakistan where you will be stared at like crazy and you will not be able to go out from your home after sunset and where all colleagues will talk behind your back and where working women will be considered as immoral by default. I really hate the people like you who love to live in Europe but at the same time if someone ask you why dont you go back to your land Pakistan then your obvious answer is no we dont want to. I am a woman living in Germany and Germany can never be compared with my country Pakistan in any manner as far as Women rights are concerned. !!!Recommend

  • Alex
    Jan 18, 2013 - 3:39PM

    “A career as a woman journalist is just plain easier for me in Pakistan than in Germany.”

    A career in anything is easier for you in Pakistan. You belong to the 0.1%. Stop whining. One of the most infuriating things about this country is how the blood sucking elite manages to portray itself as “oppressed”.

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  • Alex
    Jan 18, 2013 - 3:43PM

    @John B: I’m glad to see, from the other comments, that you are not. Tribune, a liberal leaning paper, should fire this spoilt brat on the spot for writing such a ridiculous piece which is an insult to the suffering Pakistani people who do not enjoy her gross priviledges.

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  • doom
    Jan 18, 2013 - 4:09PM

    Surprised by the comments here. Yes, Pakistan has a horrible track record with women. But is it so impossible that the German newspaper industry is misogynistic? This is not about who is better or worse. I think people are naive enough to think women have achieved perfect equality in these developed countries. Sexual harassment and discrimination in the work place continues to be a problem everywhere.

    I would also point to the Berlusconi and Dominique Straus-Kahn scandals. Their cases, how people stayed silent and ignored their behaviour for years as if it was nothing, and how people continued to speak in their favour in their countries after everything that was revealed, have shown how attitudes towards women are still perverted in many different ways. America and Britain I think are somewhat better.

    And the truth is that there are now progressive industries and organizations in urban Pakistan that have opened to women wonderfully with a great deal of equality, and the media it seems is one, as well as multinational companies and the development sector where gender issues are talked about endlessly. They probably offer a better work environment for women than other countries.

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  • nm
    Jan 18, 2013 - 4:21PM

    Surprised by the comments here. Yes, Pakistan has a horrible track record with women. But is it so impossible that the German newspaper industry is misogynistic? This is not about who is better or worse. I think people are naive enough to think women have achieved perfect equality in these developed countries. Sexual harassment and discrimination in the work place continues to be a problem everywhere.

    I would also point to the Berlusconi and Dominique Straus-Kahn scandals. Their cases, how people stayed silent and ignored their behaviour for years as if it was nothing, and how people continued to speak in their favour in their countries after everything that was revealed, have shown how attitudes towards women are still perverted in many different ways. America and Britain I think are somewhat better.

    And the truth is that there are now progressive industries and organizations in urban Pakistan that have opened to women wonderfully with a great deal of equality, and the media it seems is one, as well as multinational companies and the development sector where gender issues are talked about endlessly. They probably offer a better work environment for women than other countries.

    Recommend

  • Palvasha von Hassell
    Jan 18, 2013 - 5:37PM

    @Sana Mir: If we live somewhere, doesn’t mean we have to slavishly love it! Plz. Don’t be simple. When I live in Pakistan, I also criticize many things there! Who on earth are you to advise me where i should live or not??

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  • Palvasha von Hassell
    Jan 18, 2013 - 5:41PM

    @doom:
    You speak the truth

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  • Jan 18, 2013 - 7:06PM

    @John B:
    You’re not alone.

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  • Leopard
    Jan 18, 2013 - 7:57PM

    But, in any case, a career as a woman journalist is just plain easier for me in Pakistan than in Germany. In which Germany were you? At least not the one in which I live.

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  • stranger
    Jan 18, 2013 - 9:00PM

    I agree with all those who say that its a case of sour grapes. Germany , for that matter Europe is not as bad as described.She didnt make it , for some reason and now finding scapegoats .

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  • Bangash
    Jan 18, 2013 - 9:07PM

    Author may have suffered discrimination in Germany but I think the commentators have a point that he English is awkward and she has some inferiority or superiority complex issues.

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  • Haris Chaudhry
    Jan 18, 2013 - 9:43PM

    I must also add that someone inviting a colleague after-hours twice does not automatically translates into anything of a sleazy nature.. ! Perhaps both of the gentlemen were well leaning people and only able to see you late after hours.

    Not impressed !

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  • gp65.
    Jan 18, 2013 - 11:47PM

    I have never lived in Germany but can share my views of how you would have been received in USA where I happen to be a working woman:

    Sending unsolicited emails and making unsolicited phonecalls is seen as pushy not as having good networking skills.

    Carelessness in professional duties is frowned upon – no matter how well known the school you studied at is. When you are writing an OpEd for your employer and do not bother to get your grammar right (beginning a sentence with ‘And’) – it is seen as careless.

    Attitude of gratitude is completely missing. While there is no need to be slavishly effusive, the fact that you could not even find one positive thing to say amomg the litany of complaints about Alex Springer corporation – the organizatuion that gave you a fellowship and provided you a job – is telling.

    You state that Germans see women as being either smart or attractive and imply that since you were attractive, they assumed you would not be smart. Don’t know about Germany but in US pushy, whiny, ungrateful women with a high sense of entitlement are not considered attractive.

    If you had introspected a little or sought feedback from your German friends (did you have any?), you might have had an easier time.

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  • Mueen Batlay
    Jan 19, 2013 - 12:27AM

    This account is insightful. It illustrates that for all the challenges that women may face in Pakistan, there are some positives as well. We should become aware of these advantages, and build upon them.

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  • ali akbar
    Jan 19, 2013 - 3:02AM

    @gp65 while I agree that the writer is a whiny little Cinderella, there quite a bit of difference between European and North American culture. Things flow at a leisurely pace in most of Europe unlike N.A. The American culture far more dynamic and evolved because of its history. (read up a bit about the country you live in). What you just did would be described as comparing apples with oranges in America.

    “Sending unsolicited emails and making unsolicited phone calls is seen as pushy not as having good networking skills.” —-> this is not true! Expressions of interest and job inquires are part of the job search process and may even help you get a ‘foot in the door’ (I’m sure you’ve heard of that phrase).

    “Don’t know about Germany but in US pushy, whiny, ungrateful women with a high sense of entitlement are not considered attractive.” —— well, she wasn’t talking about U.S now was she??

    “Carelessness in professional duties is frowned upon – no matter how well known the school you studied at is. When you are writing an OpEd for your employer and do not bother to get your grammar right (beginning a sentence with ‘And’) – it is seen as careless.” —-> careless indeed. Last I checked, there are editors are every newspaper who are supposed to catch such errors while proof reading. Also, you don’t end sentences with ‘is’ and its not ‘organizatuion’

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  • Akash
    Jan 19, 2013 - 3:59AM

    Forgive me for saying so, but your writing is not up to scratch.I am not surprised that you were not taken seriously. You are just being plain sensational for circulating stories about your chimerical date invitations.

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  • Maria
    Jan 19, 2013 - 4:51AM

    @Sana Mir: Whether you wish to admit it or not, there is a fair deal of sexism at play in Germany. Women, not only in Germany but other European countries know only too well that they may have to agree to inappropriate interaction with male superiors to get ahead or at the very least accept sexist remarks and loutish behaviour. In Pakistan there is a fair degree of sexism in the common arena but at the educated work place level, there is surprisingly little sexism; Quite simply people are worried about how society including sisters, mothers and friends will see them. Add to this the notion that some irate male family member might well punch your lights out, you can quickly see why Pakistani men have to more careful in the educated work place environment- the women in this arena also have access and contacts with others who can cause real trouble to a sexist man. Yes modern German society is more liberal and open with good social supports as a generalization. The vast majority of poor Pakistanis who went there, did so as refugees since Germany has no legal immigration for people wanting to settle there. If you’re smuggling yourself into Europe to claim asylum since you were poor and had no future in a poor part of Pakistan, obviously Germany or any European country will look free and fair but try to see it from the writer’s point of view. As someone who has been in Germany and Pakistan as an educated person and not a refugee, I agree with her writing. Ich werde sagen dass sie Recht hat.

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  • gp65 .
    Jan 19, 2013 - 6:57AM

    @ali akbar: It is true the author did not write about US and there is a difference between the 2 cultures. That is why I did not assume they were identical and clearly provided the prism through which I evaluated the OpEd. I do however believe that culture in Western Anglo Saxon majority countries is closer to each other than it is to Desi culture and Germany is amongst the least laid back of European countries.

    Secondly, I am careless and make typos or don’t fix my grammar sometimes in these boards. But this is not my profession. I am never careless in my professional life.

    Finally I do understand that networking can help to get a foot in the door but most good networkers will say that cold calling or cold mailing is not an effective way to network. Since she mentioned her networking skills and her cold calling/emailing more than once, I felt I should point that out.

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  • S.R.H. Hashmi
    Jan 19, 2013 - 8:11AM

    If the lady is narrating her personal expeience, why is it that some of the readers find it so hard to believe her? Due to the high degree of permissiveness in the western society, having sex is not normally considered any different from smoking a cigarette or sipping a cup of coffee, and men are normally bewildered as to why someone should resist such a ‘natural’ urge, and their advances, most of the time taking it as a personal affront. It is the same story in almost all fields and not just restricted to journalism. I have read reports of instructors not training female athletes properly unless they obliged them.

    Recently, there was a report of a court case in Germany against a brother and siter living together as husband and wife, with a few children born out of the relationship already. There was pressure on the courts to treat the case as elsewhere in Europe where there is generally no bar on such relationships, but the German court did send them to prison, and I am sure there would have been huge protests against the violation of basic human rights of the couple. I also remember having read a long article by a white lady complaining that men do not take women seriously until they have reached a fairly-advanced age, when they lose sex appeal, and it is then that men partially recognize women as professionals, treating them as ‘honorary’ men, which means that even after long years in a profession, women are not accepted as such but as men, albeit ‘honorary’ ones. Is it not a fact that despite women being in every field, serving as presidents and prime ministers, and even doing active service in army, navy and air force, we have not heard of a woman commander-in-chief, at least not yet. Does not that demonstrate a certain attitude?

    Karachi

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  • amoghavarsha.ii
    Jan 19, 2013 - 11:57AM

    @ahmed,
    ” you never start sentence with And”
    Absolutely right, this is school day grammer.Recommend

  • XYZ
    Jan 19, 2013 - 5:29PM

    To those objecting to starting a new sentence with And: Ahmed and Amoghavarsha ii to be precise.

    Language is a living thing which changes somewhat with times.

    If still in doubt, just read the article “Whose ‘terrorists’ is West at war with now? published in Today’s Dawn, page 13 (International), column 1, third paragraph. Robert Fisk not only started a new sentence, but a new paragraph altogether, with ‘And’ and he is not exactly a non-entity in journalism.

    And by the way, re-check your spelling for grammar.

    And please don’t try to embarrass the writer; she seems to have been harassed enough in Germany.

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  • bibi
    Jan 20, 2013 - 3:23AM

    After reading the article what is a cold call and what is a cold email?

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  • Insaan
    Jan 21, 2013 - 8:48AM

    Author ” Friends and colleagues I mentioned this to, said it was perhaps my demeanor, a vibe I gave off, or the way I dressed. Some said this was no big deal and happened everywhere. Still others said that I should use it for my personal gain. Call me an idealist or an idiot, I couldn’t handle it.”

    I tend to agree with your friends and colleagues.You were ready to have coffee at 3 PM. No one asks some woman to meet at 10 PM for coffee when meeting for the first time. The guy who asked you to have coffee at 10 PM felt for some reason you were needy.

    Do you go out for coffee with Pakistani men at 3 PM?

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  • Sarah
    Mar 11, 2013 - 11:35AM

    The competition for journalism jobs in Europe is way more intense. In Germany you would find many more graduates from Columbia and the other top universities. Here in Pakistan, they are a rarity so you would have no trouble being employed by ET – after all the average person in Karachi cant even write correctly in English.

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