For peace with India

Despite hesitant overtures by both countries, lasting peace between Pakistan and India now seems as distant as ever.


Editorial August 28, 2010

Despite hesitant overtures by both countries, lasting peace between Pakistan and India now seems as distant as ever. On August 27, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh signalled his willingness to continue talks despite Pakistan’s alleged involvement in attacks on Indian interests in Afghanistan. The prime minister is right to worry about Pakistan’s actions and sensible to use negotiations rather than just rhetoric to express these concerns. While Dr Singh’s pursuit of diplomacy is laudable, the outstanding issues between the two countries will require action. And much of the groundwork will have to be done by Pakistan. For instance, there is no progress on the case against seven members of the Lashkar-e-Taiba arrested in Pakistan for alleged involvement in the Mumbai attacks.

Furthermore, allegations on the continued link between Pakistan and the Afghan Taliban remain and that the latter are being used as some kind of asset to ward off India’s perceived ‘evil designs’ on Afghanistan seem to be surfacing too often and many important people in foreign capitals tend to at least partially believe them. At the very least, the perception that Islamabad turns a blind eye to the activities and presence of the Afghan Taliban inside its territory is quite strong.  Whether active aid or malign neglect, this has to change, if peace with India is our ultimate aim. Dr Singh has been quoted as saying that India faces three barriers in its quest to become a world power: energy, education and Pakistan. Pakistan, meanwhile, will need to import food for years to come because of the devastating floods, and India would be the cheapest country from which to get these imports. Everything else aside, self-interest alone calls for fraternal relations between India and Pakistan.

Published in The Express Tribune, August 29th, 2010.

COMMENTS (4)

Ishaan | 11 years ago | Reply Pakistan is India's long lost brother...and a lot of people in India and Pakistan feel the same. It's high time that the people of Pakistan realize the conspiracy they had been a part of, they're being fed with Anti-India sentiments by the Islamic extremists every day. The government is corrupt, the name of Islam is being maligned by the extremists, Pakistan is being called the failed state and the biggest center of terrorist outfits. Do you think we are pro-Allah or Shaitan has taken us over? Pakistan has turned evil, and only a people's revolution is the answer to all our problems. If it can happen in history with Russia and France, why not in Pakistan?
Praful Shah | 11 years ago | Reply It is refreshing to read such balanced article in Pakistani press about India. It is the ego and jealousy that is the main obstruction. Reference to the issue about Kashmere the issue can be resolved if there is will. The thought that one can have results his will never happen and the force used has turned up to be useless. Regarding the violence in Kashmere the casualties are Muslims. The ungraceful behaviour of Pakistani politician not accepting $ 5,000,000 Indian aid for flood is not only pathetic but charade about accepting the aid. Pakistan is consumed about the jealousy about India. Let me remind the Pakistani foreign minister Kashmere problem is old than his life on this planet and will not have result so quickly. I have read in Pakistani President telling the Chinese are very close friends. All I have to remind Pakistanis their blood contains Hindu genes not Chinese. Muslims have to be also tolerant about Hindus. India is subsiding Rs. 45,000 for each Indian Muslim who is going for Hajj while Indian Muslims went on riot when government allotted 25 acres of travels facilities for Hindus in Kashmere. Bottom line is let us civilized and have good relations which will bear fruit in future.
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