Shifting Pakistan and Saudi Arabia relations

Published: July 18, 2012
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The writer is an adjunct scholar with the Middle East Institute and president of Vizier Consulting, LLC. He tweets at @pakistanpolicy

The writer is an adjunct scholar with the Middle East Institute and president of Vizier Consulting, LLC. He tweets at @pakistanpolicy

There is no crisis in Islamabad and Riyadh, but something serious is apparently going on between the two governments.

On July 16, Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah held two major meetings in Jeddah — one with US National Security Advisor Tom Donilon, who has President Barack Obama’s ear on foreign policy, and the other with Prime Minister Raja Pervaiz Ashraf, the lame duck newbie whose tenure is tenuous and very temporary.

In his snubbing of President Asif Ali Zardari for three years, the Saudi monarch has made it clear that he can be quite selective about those he meets. So his holding of talks with Ashraf looks a bit odd. ‘Why Raja Rental?’ one might ask.

The meeting, which is said to have gone on longer than scheduled, was also attended by three leading Saudi national security officials, including the foreign minister and intelligence chief (who previously was the Saudi envoy to Islamabad). Interpreting for Abdullah and Ashraf was none other than Adel al-Jubeir, who is not only the Saudi ambassador to the US but is also a chief adviser to Abdullah. Al-Jubeir’s proximity to Abdullah is such that he is said to often fly to Saudi Arabia twice a week to counsel the octogenarian leader. And al-Jubeir, if you recall, once unabashedly said: “We, in Saudi Arabia, are not observers in Pakistan, we are participants.”

Given the energy crisis in Pakistan and Ashraf’s less-than-stellar record as water and power minister, official statements from Islamabad emphasised progress in bilateral energy cooperation. But the composition of the Saudi contingent suggests that the focus was on intelligence and security issues. Strangely, Ashraf was accompanied by his religious affairs minister and ambassador to Riyadh. The Pakistani delegation’s makeup did not correspond to that of their Saudi counterparts, which might mean that the meeting was impromptu and not planned in advance. It’s quite possible that Ashraf went to get another energy bailout, while the Saudis were keen on talking about other issues that mattered more to them.

Among those issues are Pakistan-India relations. Abdullah is said to have inquired about the state of normalisation talks between Pakistan and India. It’s likely that Saudi officials went into some detail regarding their government’s extradition of alleged Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) operative Abu Jundal to India. Abu Jundal has reportedly pointed towards ISI involvement in the November 2008 Mumbai attacks.

Despite their recent moves, the Saudis are not turning on Pakistan. They cannot and they will not in the short to midterm future. The Pakistan-Saudi Arabia partnership is the closest between any two countries that don’t have a formal treaty agreement, says former Saudi intelligence chief Turki bin Faisal. It’s a deeply-rooted security partnership whose importance has grown as Riyadh-Tehran tensions rise and sectarian uncertainty increases in eastern Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, which is why Prince Bandar bin Sultan met with President Zardari in Islamabad last year. And the Saudis most certainly will want to cooperate with Pakistan to keep a check on al Qaeda and stave off the Iranians and those can-do Qataris in Afghanistan. In extraditing Abu Jundal, Riyadh is probably responding to pressure from Washington, which sees the LeT as a group that not only killed Americans in Mumbai, but is also a potential threat beyond the subcontinent.

Still, Pakistani decision-makers should recognise that no bilateral partnership is permanent and shifts can be as impactful as all-out rifts. Ties with Riyadh will be indirectly shaped by Saudi Arabia’s eastward economic push. Since 2006, the Saudis have been expanding economic ties with China and India. By 2010, annual Indo-Saudi trade grew to $25 billion. Saudi Arabia now exports more oil to China than the US. India is its fourth largest oil export market.

Trade between Saudi Arabia and India is going beyond oil. Pakistan must look to forge a strategic economic partnership with Saudi Arabia, which has a sovereign wealth fund of nearly half a trillion dollars. It can’t simply be about bartering military cooperation or food for cheaper oil. The Saudis can make sizable profits in Pakistani commercial real estate, education, infrastructure, information technology and public transportation projects. But for them to do so requires Pakistan’s leaders to think outside the box before they get boxed in.

Published in The Express Tribune, July 19th, 2012.

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Reader Comments (58)

  • Truth bites
    Jul 18, 2012 - 10:24PM

    Lacking depth, Nothing much for the reader in this op-ed.

    Recommend

  • Nadir
    Jul 18, 2012 - 10:34PM

    Time to get out of this succubus of a relationship, no not the US this time, but the Saudis. Saudi Arabia more so than America has pumped hatred, and along with Iran turned Pakistan into a proxy sectarian battlefield. The Saudis shamefully use their “custodianship” over the Holy sites to blackmail the rest of the Muslim world.

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  • Cautious
    Jul 18, 2012 - 10:51PM

    Best thing Saudi’s can do for Pakistan is stop the funding of Madrassas – Pakistan will never make progress against the extremist until they control the places where they are trained.

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  • M Baloch
    Jul 18, 2012 - 10:55PM

    And what will be the cost of this friendship? More funding to terrorists, more Saudis coming to Pakisan for hunting animal , more Pakistani soldiars to control protesters and driving women in the kindom…We should try our best to be away from the ugly business of Saudis of suppressing voice of their own people …!
    http://pakhtunkhwatimes.blogspot.fr/2011/08/editorial-saudi-support-at-what-cost.htmlRecommend

  • mahmood
    Jul 18, 2012 - 11:12PM

    US energy intelligence agency (EIA) recently reported that as a result of recent major shale gas exploitation in North America, the US will become completely independent of Gulf oil by 2035. At that point, the chief Saudi customer will be China, followed by India. This is probably why the Saudis are now looking eastward.

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  • Ali Tanoli
    Jul 18, 2012 - 11:25PM

    I think Iran regime must go it brought a tornado of destruction in Mid East and South Asia and nothing Else and most of Iraq deaths responsilbe is also Iran shia khumaini revolution during Shah Iran Raza Pehlvi time iran was so peacefull and progressive country.

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  • bangash
    Jul 18, 2012 - 11:26PM

    Saudi money and Wahhabism have been major contributors to the extremism and terror we see today.

    Recommend

  • Ali Tanoli
    Jul 18, 2012 - 11:28PM

    @Mahmood
    Its not exploration in america but the truth is Brazil oil flow will starts in 2020 and main buyer will be great U.S.A and close to home.Recommend

  • BlackJack
    Jul 18, 2012 - 11:31PM

    The Saudis have realized that Pakistan will always be a supplicant – there is no need to invest in such a relationship. However, relations of other countries may hinge on how Saudi handles any terror connections that emanate in Pakistan and seek refuge in the Gulf region – and they seem to have wised up to that pretty quick.

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  • 3rdRockfromtheSun
    Jul 18, 2012 - 11:45PM

    So in the recent past, apart from the Indians & Afghans (well they always says so, hence they don’t count) – the Americans, Brits, Germans, various other NATO countries, China and now Saudis : have all had a ‘conversation’ with the Pakistan govt on the issue of “security”. I wonder how many more such conversations are needed before the Pakistanis realize that this is no conspiracy to “get them”, but that there is indeed a problem, and unless action is taken soon; it would be too late!Recommend

  • Ali Tanoli
    Jul 19, 2012 - 12:19AM

    Saudis and pakistanis allways gonna need each other the way america and pakistan do….

    Recommend

  • Pakistani Agnostic
    Jul 19, 2012 - 12:45AM

    None of the comments actually relate to what the author wrote. Same old pieces

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  • kingfisher
    Jul 19, 2012 - 1:41AM

    @Ali Tanoli:
    Check your facts, without even knowing an iota of truth stop blaming it for the problems created by Saudis and the Americans. Iran has never been linked to any extremist activity, all finger & evidence points towards you know who. So keep your half baked comments to yourself or else get em right.

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  • Babloo
    Jul 19, 2012 - 2:06AM

    Why would Saudis invest their petro dollars in a very corrupt and lawless country ?

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  • nomi
    Jul 19, 2012 - 3:31AM

    It is just so sad. Why do we have follow the Saudis? Aren’t we the most powerful islamic country as is said by many Zaid Hamid fan boys?

    Pakistan seems to be Rentistan. Whoever needs us to be used as cannon fodder just calls the GHQ.

    So much for a nuclear powered nation.

    Recommend

  • adam
    Jul 19, 2012 - 4:05AM

    i agree most of people that pakistan must look its interest not saudi ,we must forg good relation with iran which is our next door neighbour and it can full fill our energy needs better than these wahabis can do no shipping all at border ,so i am not saying we should disengage but move in middle between saudi and iran ,and we must held accountable these wahabis for funding terrorist inside pakistan if i am pm i will ask them to stop these atm machine i think saudis hurt us more than give any benefit they r american puppets what he will say they will do nothing more .

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  • Jul 19, 2012 - 6:27AM

    In his snubbing of President Asif Ali Zardari for three years, the Saudi monarch has made it clear that he can be quite selective about those he meets.

    Surprised author downplayed it, but as per Wikileaks, the Wahhabi king is so bigotedly selective that it most certainly not be someone of a sectarian Shia background. If only it had been the Sunni Nawaz Sharif. Curse this democracy….

    @Ali Tanoli:

    Iraq deaths? Which one. When the Sunni Gulf Arabs supported dictator Saddam’s attack in the 80’s on Iran? Or when the US, whom you now seem fond of, invaded Iraq in 2003 with consequences that included Al Qaeda and Sunni insurgents blowing everything and everyone? Interesting prejudiced Deoband/Wahhabi aligned talking points, nevertheless.

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  • Nitin
    Jul 19, 2012 - 7:02AM

    @Babloo:
    Dude, India is an equally corrupt country, although it is not as lawless as Pakistan. As you know, our ups govt. is rife with corruption

    Recommend

  • Polpot
    Jul 19, 2012 - 7:53AM

    “Despite their recent moves, the Saudis are not turning on Pakistan. They cannot and they will not in the short to midterm future.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Amusing to note that the author does not consider Saudi’s handing over of a person holding Pakistani passport to India as not turning on Pakistan.

    There is no law against deluding oneself, is there?

    Recommend

  • Polpot
    Jul 19, 2012 - 8:00AM

    “The Saudis can make sizable profits in Pakistani commercial real estate, education, infrastructure, information technology and public transportation projects”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Any investor makes a list of countries and evaluates the risks and rewards per country.

    Where do you think does Pakistan rank on such a list?

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  • EX Pakistani
    Jul 19, 2012 - 8:02AM

    Post US withdrawl Pakistan will have a shock… no one in ME is willing or will be willing to let Pakistan do what they have been till now. Pakistan in the eyes of ME & GCC is no less a rogue state.

    Recommend

  • Musings
    Jul 19, 2012 - 8:06AM

    There is something more ominous in this meeting attended by important security advisers of the king, and the Pakistani PM. Note who accompanied the Raja Pervez Ashraf? The ‘religious minister’. What was the statement that we got to hear after the meeting? Saudi Arab is ready to extend all support to Pakistan. This comes at a time when Syrian conflict has entered, apparently, in its last phase. The spillover will soon start appearing. Secondly, there is an uprising in two of the Shia-dominated provinces of Saudi Arab against the monarchy and its discriminatory policies against the minority. Saudi Arab needs Pakistani forces to quell that uprising in Saudi Arabia like they did in Bahrain. Thirdly, there is a gradual rise of SSP in Pakistan where you see Ludhyanwi and Tahir Ashrafi being the common features on TV/analysis more than Hafeez Saeed. All this points to a new Wahabi-Salafi rise in the Muslim world.

    Recommend

  • kaalchakra
    Jul 19, 2012 - 8:44AM

    Although the relationship with Saudi Arabia is the most beneficial and desirable from every angle, their recent backstabbing of Pakistan has really been upsetting. I hope the leaders would make it very very clear to Saudi officials that they can either pick Pakistan or pick India. They can’t have both. If they want to work with Pakistan, then Pakistani assets must be absolutely safe in Saudi Arabia. If Saudis ever even think of repeating their recent act of betrayal, Pakistan must cut off all relations with them.

    Recommend

  • Jul 19, 2012 - 9:17AM

    You have to ask some basic questions. Why are US and Saudia allies? US needs Oil, Saudia wants to sell them to make money and US provides it a nuclear umbrella and safety.

    What if the US becomes independent of Gulf oil, as its predicted to be by 2035? Saudia will need others to buy its Oil, say India-China?

    If Saudi Arabia has Oil, which translates to money, it nevertheless needs buyers to buy the Oil to get to that wealth. This is quite interdependent actually.

    Saudia will in the future always prefer India over Pakistan. It will always suspect Pakistan due to its physical proximity to Iran and will always have a master-slave relationship with it. With India its a relationship of equals.

    India represents the future, Pakistan represents of what a nation-state should not be.

    Recommend

  • GhostRider
    Jul 19, 2012 - 9:32AM

    @Ali Tanoli
    Sure you can have your biased opinion but it doesnot change the fact that Salafi ideology has brought the muslim world in the state of chaos and guess who is the promoter of that ideology? you guessed right..bingo

    Recommend

  • Prince
    Jul 19, 2012 - 9:39AM

    @Babloo:
    Hey indian loser, so we meet again… you’re right, they should invest in india… even more corrupt than Pakistan… hahaha

    Recommend

  • m.usama.kabbir
    Jul 19, 2012 - 11:08AM

    Shame on you for calling an elected PM as Raja Rental. Do you have guts to call this Army Chief as Kiyani Butcher because of Shia and Baloch Genocide?

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  • Jayan
    Jul 19, 2012 - 11:23AM

    Instead of funding the Madrassas the Saudis should directly fund for uplifting of the poor in Pakistan. Saudis should give priority to humaity over religion

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  • A J Khan
    Jul 19, 2012 - 12:36PM

    Pakistan was a great country with abundance of God given resources, talented general public, but destroyed by the incompetent leadership and financially corrupt bureaucracy / government officials. Countries like Saudi Arabia use to get “Zakat” from us in Ayub Khan’s reign. Pakistan was one of the fastest growing economy and Koreans used to seek help from us.
    It is still not impossible. We have to be at peace with our selves and those around us.
    Saudi Arabia must stop interfering in Pakistan and should not support for terrorists and Madaras

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  • Wonderful
    Jul 19, 2012 - 12:58PM

    @Ali Tanoli:
    Stop making false accusations and the sensationalisation of issues, if you want to have a healthy argument bring some facts and logic to the conversation.

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  • Lord
    Jul 19, 2012 - 1:11PM

    @Ali Tanoli:
    Bro, you cant deny the Gulf countries specially KSA is the initiator of proxy war that is being fought in Pakistan , Lebanon etc. They pumped money at the time of soviet invasion of Afghanistan. There funding enabled mass conversion of Barelvi’s to Deobandiies . They captured almost all the mosques of the big cities in matter of years. This wave of extreme islam created millions of jihadis which ruined legitimate freedom struggle of kashmiris etc.After the fall of soviets these extremist started attacking Minorities especially shias in Pakistan. Yes, Iran helps but only as a reaction. Dont be biased see the facts as it should be seen.

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  • Hunter punter
    Jul 19, 2012 - 1:44PM

    Saudi Arabia and UAE are very upset with Pakistan for taking back the Shamsi airbase. Besides, pakistan is being suspected for playing double/triple games. Either be with Saudi or Iran. And either be with terrorists(al queda/haqqani etc) or Saudi. Besides, Saudi has no interests in pakistan, and huge trade with India and China.
    However Pakistan has advantages that it rents out its army to protect monarchy such as was done in Bahrain. Saudi may want to rent pak army to quell its uprising in shia areas. Better to use force thru pakistan than use ones own people. That way, pakistan can be blamed for deaths etc.

    Recommend

  • Arijit Sharma
    Jul 19, 2012 - 2:14PM

    @kaalchakra: ” … I hope the leaders would make it very very clear to Saudi officials that they can either pick Pakistan or pick India. … “

    Enlighten me. What bargaining power do you have over the Saudis ?

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  • Sonya
    Jul 19, 2012 - 2:49PM

    The statement from Saudi officials i.e., “We, in Saudi Arabia, are not observers in Pakistan, we are participants.” is deemed very dangerous and admittedly high interference into Pakistan’s internal affairs.

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  • Dushmann
    Jul 19, 2012 - 2:56PM

    @kaalchakra:
    I agree. Pakistan should also cut all the oil supply to Saudi Arabia.

    Recommend

  • Feroz
    Jul 19, 2012 - 3:40PM

    There is nothing wrong in making a virtue out of necessity. Saudi Arabia did not hand over Mr Ansari to India because of US pressure but because India provided DNA samples of his parents. This is a major shift because never earlier was anyone extradited against Pakistani wishes. Secondly, the Saudis want to get a greater share of the Indian Oil market thanks to Iran being sanctioned. Message has gone loud and clear.

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  • roadkashehzada
    Jul 19, 2012 - 5:43PM

    we need to get rid of false respect and make sure that our country is respected. iran and saudi arabia have made pakistan their playing field and have pumped money to finance their like minded.
    if iran and saudi go for a war,hypothetically speaking, pakistan will loose because of overcharged self proclaimed loyalists of the religion.
    we need to stop idealising iran and saudi arabia and stop making their national heroes as ours. theres no brotherhood between countries, specially in a society whose common number of brothers is 20

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  • kaalchakra
    Jul 19, 2012 - 6:07PM

    Ajith Sharma

    The relationship between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia is thicker than blood. You can keep dreaming that you will be able to hurt it.

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  • Nasir Mahmood
    Jul 19, 2012 - 6:14PM

    Pakistani leaderships short sightedness pave the way for India to boost economic ties with the country that helped Pakistan financially or otherwise on each occasion. Another goal achieved to complete the agenda assigned to them.

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  • Jul 19, 2012 - 6:30PM

    @Cautious: While sharing your feelings the two items on Pakistan’s immediate agenda, are fresh elections and a complete divorce from the archaic, boxed in policy of ‘strategic depth and assets.’
    The funding of Madras is the biggest headache facing the common person and the looming storm of civil disobedience and fratricide is fast becoming a reality.
    Allah alone knows how long this country will continue to beg and muddle along. Salams

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  • Ali tanoli
    Jul 19, 2012 - 6:43PM

    Saudis help with american tech Russia got defeated and many countries got freedom from regime 2. iran never help but messed up the region by revolution its messed up lebanon and syria by helping shia regimes there and funded pakistan shia and start it pin pointing in iraq internal affair as well.

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  • Somesh
    Jul 19, 2012 - 7:41PM

    @kaalchakra:
    their recent backstabbing of Pakistan has really been upsetting. I hope the leaders would make it very very clear to Saudi officials that they can either pick Pakistan or pick India. They can’t have both. If they want to work with Pakistan, then Pakistani assets must be absolutely safe in Saudi Arabia.
    Do you mean:
    1. Helping another country to bring terrorists to court is ‘backstabbing’ just because the terrorist held a Pakistani passport?
    2. Is Abu Jundal a Pakistani ‘asset’ in Saudi? I know you people love ‘Strategic assets’ but still!!
    3. What leverage does Pakistan have in Saudi to make them ‘pick’ Pakistan over ‘India’? Don’t forget that India has more Muslims than the entire population of Pakistan.
    4. Well if you consider Sunnis and other non Muslims as Kafirs only 75% of Pakistan is Muslims which comes to around 140 million people compared to 177 million in India!. Now, who do you think has leverage even religion wise?

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  • Nazir Ahmed
    Jul 19, 2012 - 8:38PM

    I feel Pakistan must have very close relations with Iran because both countries share a long border. Relations with Saudi Arabia have to be independent of Pakistan’s core interests of keeping our borders secure. This gets more crucial when we have confrontation with India and now the western borders with Afghanistan have necessitated deployment of considerable large number of troops.

    Saudi have interfered in the internal affairs of Pakistan in most negative way. They have funded extremist ‘Wahabi’ elements in Pakistan since Russian occupation of Afghanistan starting in early eighties. Pakistan will take lot of effort to recover from the damage; the Saudis have done to Pakistan. Saudi rulers are extension of US administration in the region and playing their role as directed. Handing over Abu Jandal to India instead of Pakistan is the latest example.

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  • Kamran Choudhry
    Jul 19, 2012 - 8:45PM

    It has been said that countries do not have friends but geo-political-economic interests. Saudi growing relationship with India is an example. Saudi Arabia is using Pakistan as a basket case and reinforcing its cult on us through our political and religious operatives. The best thing we should do is improve our economy using our own resources (we have plenty) meticulously and start looking at India in realistic terms and build permanent friendship. Remember we are genetically not Arab. Recommend

  • Arijit Sharma
    Jul 19, 2012 - 8:52PM

    @Nazir Ahmed: ” … Saudi rulers are extension of US administration in the region and playing their role as directed. Handing over Abu Jandal to India instead of Pakistan is the latest example. … “

    Oh yes, the Americans have this extremely effective weapon called “Regime Change”.

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  • Jul 19, 2012 - 8:55PM

    @Ali tanoli:

    Compared to funding for reactionary Wahhabi/Salafi/Deoband/Sunni Islamists by Saudis in Pak who indulged in sectarian extremism, massacres and whole scale terrorism since the 80’s? Or Saudis recognizing the Taliban after US help and short lived freedom? Or cracking down on Bahrain or their own Shiite population in an oil rich province? Conveniently left out?

    Give it up. Not a fan of Iran myself, but shameful hyperbolic misleadings and misgivings are a pro-Wahhabi/Deoband bigoted geo-political narrative based on sectarian bias and prejudiced hate.Recommend

  • BruteForce
    Jul 19, 2012 - 9:07PM

    @kaalchakra:

    Went too far, dude.. Assets thing was a bit too much. You had me fooled, gotta tell ya.. Where are you from, Pakistan or India? I am very curious..

    I am glad you are on our side.. Awesome..

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  • Ali tanoli
    Jul 19, 2012 - 9:51PM

    @bigsaf,
    so sad man u trying to changed the whole subject what i am saying is true by the fact and if Russian never terrorized the innocent Afghans then this region wasnot that bad. and if iran stays a under sha e iran then may be both countries did not seen a that destruction and deaths…

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  • Somesh
    Jul 19, 2012 - 10:03PM

    @kaalchakra:
    The relationship between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia is thicker than blood. You can keep dreaming that you will be able to hurt it.
    Well the Specific density of it is somewhat near to the petrol from Saudi oil fields… By this logic all we need to do is create a spark….. The rest will be visible to you. Well actually its just begun with Abu Jundal…..

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  • jracforr
    Jul 19, 2012 - 10:07PM

    Islamic civilization in almost 1400 years old and if compared with ancient Roman civilization at the corresponding stage [ 600 AD ], the eastern half of the empire will eclipse the wealth and power of it’s former western masters. This happened when the eastern Roman city of Byzantium eclipse the power of Rome. This same situation is likely to happen in the Islamic world as Islamabad Pakistan will eventually attain the status of ancient Byzantium.It will no longer represent Arabia’s interest in Asia but instead Asia’s interest in the Middle East. A significant character adjustment must precede this change however .Pakistan’s purpose in not to form a wedge between Iran and India but rather to bridge the divide and make possible a prosperous and multicultural region. Iran’s obsession with Palestine may make this a difficult task however.

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  • Hem
    Jul 19, 2012 - 10:39PM

    @A J Khan:

    Hi met, I could not agree more wtih you, but before you ask Saudis to stop supporting terrorists and madrasas in Pakistan your Pakistani government should put their own house in order; you people are quite happy when your jihadis attack targets in India but not when they attack any targets in Pakistan. Your home trained militants who attack India will actually destroy Pakistan instead.

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  • Jul 19, 2012 - 11:06PM

    @Ali tanoli:

    Didn’t change anything, just pointing out how untrue, bigoted and ridiculous the arguments are. An article heavy on Saudi Arabia, as well as your sad mad crush for it, you continuously deflect the whole subject to Iran and anti-Shia resentment over and over.

    Don’t blame Russia for the stupid, oppressive and violent Saudi Wahhabi-Zia Deoband military/militant team up after which gave us backward Pak laws, anti-Shia sectarian oppression in Pak, Jihadist activity in Kashmir, etc. Iran were against Russia and the Afghan Communist regime as well then. They didn’t endorse the Taliban, like Pak and Saud did, who’d later house Al Qaeda.

    You’re clearly fond of dictators, wishing the Shah had stayed and excusing Saddam’s attack. Regardless of Iran’s Shia theocracy, there was no justification (as much as you tout hyperbolic ‘conspiracist meddling’) for the attack by an opportunist Iraq dictator and his paranoid anti-Shia/Persian bigoted Sunni Gulf Arab allies whom you support.

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  • Anyways
    Jul 20, 2012 - 12:01AM

    Why are Paki so interested in an Indian called Abu Jundal?

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  • Ali tanoli
    Jul 20, 2012 - 12:04AM

    @bigsaf,
    Your pakistan was begging for help and if wahabi/Deobandi/Salafi Saudia didnot send it that time your name today would be a bigsafove and your streets would have a litter with innocent blood and those Deobandi u blaming for defeated Russia Empire with almoghty american tech
    and saudi petro dollars and your iran shia was ally of communist Russia and Hazrat Khumaini
    was getting all the support of Russia and iranian shia regime never help Mujahideen of afghan
    and was bussy killing both sides of shia with iraq war shamefully and turban didnot understand it.

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  • Pollack
    Jul 20, 2012 - 8:28AM

    @kaalchakra:
    “If Saudis ever even think of repeating their recent act of betrayal, Pakistan must cut off all relations with them.”

    The master lays down the house rules. Not the slave. You are standing logic in its head.

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  • kaalchakra
    Jul 20, 2012 - 7:02PM

    Pollack

    That might have been the case once. Not anymore. The future of Islamic civilization belongs to Pakistan.

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  • Nazir Ahmed
    Jul 20, 2012 - 8:47PM

    @kaalchakra:

    I agree with you. Pakistan spread over the vast expanses of the Indus valley and its tributaries is a very rich country. Deserts of Arabia have no match to the wealth contained in rich variety of terrain of Pakistan. Their oil wealth is not everlasting and they can come back to their original conditions after a few decades. Pakistan had made unprecedented progress in a short time of over a decade i.e. before 1965 war. It was a model of development for the countries getting their independence after the second world war when colonial powers lost grip over their domains. The Saudis and Gulf Sheikhdoms were insignificant; in fact late Shiekh Zaid on first his visit to Pakistan was received by the Deputy Commissioner of Rawalpindi and could not get audience with the President Ayub Khan. It was initiation of armed conflict with India aimed at derailing Pakistan from path to progress. Senior citizens of Pakistan like me who have enjoyed life of peace, prosperity and happiness know the characters that played into the hands of Capitalist mafia for their narrow personal gains. An honest and competent leadership is the only requirement to put Pakistan back to the path of progress. The Saudi’s are extension of US administration in the region and will meet their fate when the US loses control of the region which Insha Allah will be pretty soon.

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  • Fahran
    Jul 21, 2012 - 9:11PM

    @A J Khan:Mr.Looser, that choice of who gets support is not dictated by Saudis but Pakistanis themselves!!!!!! If you choose religion-based country you get support of countries like saudi. Why blame outsiders when you run a religious industry on a daily basis including educating children about glorious islam……

    Recommend

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