Shoaib Akhtar: ‘PCB on rampage to destroy cricket’

Files petition against PCB's penalty on him in 2008, ban from playing cricket for one-and-a-half year and Rs7m.


Express June 24, 2011

LAHORE: Justice Sheikh Azmat Saeed of the Lahore High Court (LHC) on Friday while hearing the writ petition of Shoaib Akhtar said that it seemed as if the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) is on a rampage to destroy cricket in Pakistan.

Akhtar in his petition challenges the penalty imposed on him by an appellate tribunal of the PCB, a ban from playing cricket for one-and-a-half year, and a fine of Rs7 million. The petition was filed in 2008 but the board has not responded to date. The LHC chief justice on July 3, 2008 gave interim relief which allowed Akhtar to participate in national and international cricket by suspending the ban on him. The court directed the PCB counsel to ensure submission of reply by next hearing date of hearing, September 27. Akhtar’s counsel Abid Hasan Minto pointed out that his client was awarded punishment after cancellation of his central contract which is not permissible under the law. He submitted that the appellate tribunal of the PCB was not authorised to award such penalties under the relevant law. Taffazul H Rizvi, counsel for PCB, said that every player was bound to obey the laws of International Cricket Council (ICC). He said Akhtar’s unprofessional behaviour had compelled the PCB to implement the ICC rules. He said the board was justified in its decision and it had afforded Akhtar the opportunity to defend himself.

Published in The Express Tribune, June 25th, 2011.

COMMENTS (1)

[email protected] | 10 years ago | Reply its totally unfair with shoaib akhtar.he won many matches for Pakistan and in return what PCB is doing with him.fine should be withdraw because its the hard earned money and player has only 8 to 10 years to earn money for his whole life.
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