SHC displeased with police reports on missing children, persons

Orders to recover the missing immediately, progress reports summoned 


Our Correspondent October 26, 2018
Sindh High Court. PHOTO: EXPRESS

KARACHI: The Sindh High Court (SHC) rejected on Thursday the police reports on missing children as unsatisfactory and ordered them to submit another progress report by November 15. A two-member bench, headed by Justice Naimatullah Phulpoto, heard the case and expressed displeasure with the reports. It said that the police performance has been non-serious. According to the police reports, Sindh Inspector-General (IG) formed a committee comprising senior officers of the Anti-Violent Crime Cell, Anti-Car Lifting Cell, and others, which has been in touch with the parents of missing children in Karachi and police of other provinces. The Crime Investigation Agency (CIA) Deputy Inspector General (DIG) Amin Yousufzai informed the court that prior to a previous hearing of the case, two missing children had been recovered, and since 2014, 129 children have been recovered.

During the proceedings, the parents of a missing girl, Saima who went missing from Baldia Town, informed the court that she had been missing for two years. "The police were not cooperative."

SHC reprimands police in missing children case

The bench ordered the police to look into all aspects of the cases of missing children.

Missing persons' case

The same bench expressed dissatisfaction with another police report regarding the recovery of 100 missing persons and demanded a detailed report by November 28. The court remarked that the police doesn't care about anyone's agony and now we don't want to listen any excuses, just recover the missing persons. The families of missing persons Noor Jamal, Mukhtar, Kamran Ahmed and others stated that after every three months investigation officers are changed. Investigation officers, Joint Investigation Team (JIT) and task force say something else and courts say something else. Court expressed mistrust over police reports and directed the police and other law enforcement agencies to recover the missing persons through modern devices and submit a report by November 28.

Electrocution case

The SHC on Thursday heard the appeal filed by K-Electric (KE) Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Tayyab Tareen challenging the order of a sessions court to register a case of the death of 8-year old child against the CEO of KE. A two-member bench, headed by Chief Justice (CJ) Ahmed Ali Sheikh, heard the appeal and upon completion of arguments, reserved the verdict. The CJ asked CEO Tareen's lawyer Barrister Abid Zuberi about the reservations he had regarding the registration of the case. Barrister Zubairi argued that the CEO wasn't directly involved in the incident. To this, the CJ remarked that the one who is responsible will be determined once the investigations are carried out.

The lawyer of the deceased's family said that when the CEO is responsible for the company's profits, then why not for the loss of human lives. Barrister Zuberi questioned how they were responsible for a bulb installed on a pole and said that a sessions court doesn't have the authority to direct registration of a case in such circumstances. The CJ expressed astonishment over the answer and said that the responsible people cannot be determined without a registered case. On completion of arguments by lawyers, the court reserved the verdict.

Mother of missing person tries to set herself on fire in SHC

Baldia factory case

The SHC on Thursday accepted the appeal against non-payment of remuneration to families of Baldia Factory Fire victims and issued notices to Sindh government and Sustainable Energy Services International (SESI) till November 13. A two-member bench heard the case where plaintiff's lawyer observed that a German company gave Ali Enterprises up to Rs60 million for remuneration payments. The petition requested the court to order the Sindh government to release Rs21m in one go to the victims' families instead of monthly Rs6,000 that are of no use.

Forestry department

The SHC on Thursday heard the case regarding the restructuring of forestry department and summoned the secretary of Sindh Forest Department on November 6. A two-member bench heard the case pertaining to the loss of millions to national treasury due to the restructuring. The plaintiff's lawyer claimed that restructuring of the department is taking place and new vacancies are being created in order to distribute funds acquired from United Nations for Green Pakistan. Officials facing cases in National Accountability Bureau cases have been appointed in key positions while the requirement of having MSc degree for secretary position has also been overlooked. The court demanded reply from the senior officials in next hearing.

13 missing persons return home, SHC informed

25-year-old murder case

The SHC demanded a report from Sessions judge pertaining to the murder case of a 25-year old girl, Rani, in Federal B Area and adjourned the hearing for an indefinite time period. A two-member bench heard the case. The petitioner's lawyer Liaquat Ali Khan argued that his client's daughter was murdered by Muhammad Asif, who is a security guard. He added that the guard was an employee of a security company and that company was facilitating him. He said that Asif should be arrested and jailed.

Rs32m fraud

The SHC sought a response from the NAB prosecutor in a Rs32m fraud case and adjourned the release plea filed by the accused for two months. A two-member bench heard the appeals for the release of accused Shoaib Naeem, Suhail Ilyas, Zainab Jahan, Shumaila Moiz and others in China-cutting and land occupation fraud of Rs32m. NAB prosecutor observed that accused Shoaib Naeem and others have filed the appeal for the second time. The court adjourned the hearing for two months. 

Published in The Express Tribune, October 26th, 2018.

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