Secure the politicians of Pakistan


Syed Ali June 25, 2010
Why is it such a dire concern if a politician is granted VIP protocol and police security? Shouldn't this be their earned right? We are quick to criticise and unleash our fury on to them without understanding for a second the security threats they, and their families, face when managing the affairs of the state.

Most of our leaders are under severe security threat and face people who dislike them, or would rather see them dead.

The word ‘politicians’ has become synonymous with being corrupt. Agreed, most of them may be and the history of this country stands witness to this fact. Yet, we must realise that they possess the courage and the will to be exposed to all sorts of dangers including difference of opinion from various quarters of the ruthless public. Knowing the kind of attitude opposition elicits and the 'slightly' extremist nature of the people of Pakistan, if our politicians were to roam around without security, believe me, we will not be left with any and there would be no more coming ahead to take the responsibility.

Certainly, for the maintenance of democracy it is the duty of every citizen of this country to protect the politicians. Many do end up getting assassinated on high streets, in congregations, their own homes or at places of work. As we have never arrested the killer of any of our political leaders starting from PM Liaquat Ali Khan to Mohtarama Benazir Bhutto, we should be the last ones to criticise VIP protocol.

Everybody needs security, but ordinary citizens have a very low probability of being the target of an attack. However, for high profile people, the case is different.

If we feel they deserve to be exposed to danger because they are corrupt, then we must open our mind and take an objective look at our bureaucracy. Only then will we will realise who teaches and maintains corruption at all levels. This is what our politicians fall prey to and get entangled in.

While there are politicians who are not in the ruling government and travel without official security (but with personal guards only) they too must be secured at all costs because they are also working for the people of Pakistan.

Pakistan has come to this stage, because we only criticise and discuss the obvious. Rarely does anyone notice the main culprits behind the nation's disasters.
WRITTEN BY:
Syed Ali A businessman who writes on politics and civic issues. He completed his masters in business administration from Boston University. He tweets @abidifactor.
The views expressed by the writer and the reader comments do not necassarily reflect the views and policies of the Express Tribune.

COMMENTS (10)

Saman Jafri | 10 years ago | Reply a good writeup,its always good to see the other side of the coin too,but as majority of ur polticians are corrupt and scoundrels themselves,its hard to feel any pity for them,but yes the ones who are in here beacuse of real patrotism and sense of ervice for Pakistan,we would not want them and tehir families to suffer..
Atts | 11 years ago | Reply I totally disagree based on the following grounds: Firstly its generally the common man which suffers from target killing, terrorism etc. If we were so lucky that the terrorist would actually target the VIPs!!. Secondly, the VIP are receiving protocol & police security at the COST OF THE COMMON MAN, which is being criticized..... by cost i just dont mean monetary but the security personnel on duty for the common man is also diverted to the VIP. On the one hand we say that Pakistan is a poor nation & on the other hand we spend millions on unnecessary security arrangements which are costly in terms of money, time & convenience. We do not feel the politicians deserve to be exposed to danger as they are corrupt, however, we feel their security should not be at the cost of our time, money & convenience. I would request the writer to look at this issue from another perspective.
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