Companies asked to find ways of improving productivity

Published: September 29, 2011

IBM Pakistan Country General Manager Humayun Bashir

Stock Exchange Managing
Director Nadeem Naqvi IBM Pakistan Country General
Manager Humayun Bashir Pakistan Centre for Philanthropy
head Dr Shamsh Kassim Lakha

KARACHI: Companies should analyse how they can improve their productivity in the face of present-day challenges despite the fact a number of them have significantly improved their earnings with innovative business ideas over the last few years, top leaders of national and multinational firms say.

Speaking at Pakistan Business Leaders’ Summit here on Wednesday, they emphasised the role of business leaders in present challenging times and urged the private sector to find local solutions to local problems.

The speakers said those who do not change with time would face more challenges because the world has changed dramatically after the global financial crisis of 2007-08.

“Our company brings major changes in its business strategy after every 18 months to adapt to the changes,” IBM Pakistan Country General Manager Humayun Bashir said. “If we give space, others will come and fill the gap and we will lose what we could get with innovative solutions.”

Bashir, who is also the president of American Business Council (ABC) and vice-president of Overseas Investors Chamber of Commerce and Industry (OICCI), urged business leaders to create new avenues along with their ongoing businesses.

Pakistan Centre for Philanthropy Chairman Dr Shamsh Kassim Lakha, while speaking on the topic of “leaving a leadership legacy”, said the most important legacy of business leaders is ethical and moral value.

Lakha, who has led Aga Khan University Hospital for 27 years, argued that leaving behind big buildings is not the best legacy of leaders. “The values that a leader left behind are actually bigger than big buildings because values always guide organisations, especially in challenging times and organisational dilemma,” he said.

Comptel Corporation Finland Senior Vice President and Head of Middle East-Africa Region Syed Veqarul Islam said employees notice minute details of leaders that give leaders a strong power to change their subordinates.

“Top civil and military offices in Islamabad have separate toilets for officers and junior staff,” Islam said, adding “how can you expect to bring change when a leader even does not consider others equal to him.”

Published in The Express Tribune, September 29th,  2011.

Reader Comments (2)

  • Meekal Ahmed
    Sep 29, 2011 - 2:08AM

    This is not a new discovery.

    The econometric evidence shows that in advanced and growing developing countries, including those in Asia, 80% of the growth is due to productivity improvements, and only 20% due to more inputs of labor and capital.

    In Pakistan, the results are the opposite: only 20% is due to prodictivity improvements and 80% due to more inputs of labor and capital.

    The policy implications are self-evident.

    Recommend

  • Disgruntled
    Sep 29, 2011 - 11:01AM

    Lakha, who has led Aga Khan University Hospital for 27 years, argued that leaving behind big buildings is not the best legacy of leaders. “The values that a leader left behind are actually bigger than big buildings because values always guide organisations, especially in challenging times and organisational dilemma,” he said.

    Mr. lakha’s statements are contradictory to what he built over the years: an institution with big red buildings sucking poor men’s blood.

    Recommend

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