‘Ramadan’ or ‘Ramazan’?

Published: July 21, 2013
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The writer is a London-based lawyer who tweets @ayeshaijazkhan

The writer is a London-based lawyer who tweets @ayeshaijazkhan

Come the month of fasting, a controversy erupts on Twitter. Is the ninth month of the Hijri calendar pronounced Ramazan or Ramadan? The passion with which discussion on this relatively innocuous matter takes place sometimes amazes me. Does it really make a difference either way?

Personally, I tend to say “Ramazan” when speaking in Urdu to Pakistanis but “Ramadan” when speaking to anyone else, including not just Arabs, but also Americans, British and those belonging to other nationalities. Since the months of the Hijri calendar are in the Arabic language, the authentic pronunciation would be “Ramadan” and hence, that is how it is known in most of the world. Yet, I must hasten to add that the softer “z” sound is more pleasing to the ear compared with the “d” sound, and hence, when I speak in Urdu, I call it Ramazan, which is the Pakistani version of the word.

Discussion on this subject, however, is as irrelevant as whether September, the ninth month of the Gregorian calendar, should be pronounced “September” or “Setambur” (the Urdu version). I would surmise that most people would say “September” when talking to non-Pakistanis but may say “Setambur” or “September” when talking to Pakistanis in Urdu. Essentially, it can go either way and calling it “September” doesn’t make one Westernised, just as saying “Ramadan” doesn’t make one Arabised.

While it is true that the Ramadan pronunciation became more commonplace in Pakistan once Pakistanis began returning home from the Gulf, i.e., in the 1980s, and in our conscience, that time is marked with Ziaul Haq’s misadventures, it may be far-fetched to link this adaptation of pronunciation to the influx of foreign fighters and permeation of puritanical thought in Pakistani society. Pakistanis moving to the Gulf and picking up Arabic pronunciation for certain words is no different from Pakistanis moving to the US or the UK and picking up the American or British accent.

Moreover, language has historically evolved as a result of travel and interaction between disparate communities. It is not just Pakistanis who have picked up Arabic by living in the Gulf, but also Arabs who have picked up Urdu. When I was in Makkah a couple of years ago, the Saudi driver who drove me to the Jeddah airport was keen to practise his Urdu with me. Nor is it uncommon for fabric vendors in Saudi Arabia to speak to their Pakistani clientele in a mix of Arabic and Urdu. “Kameez ke liye dhai gaz, sari ke liye chay gaz” is a common refrain.

Yet, it’s not just Ramazan/Ramadan, which sparks debate on Twitter. So does Allah Hafiz/Khuda Hafiz. The latter, unlike the former, is subject to relevant criticism by those who opine that “Allah Hafiz” is not an original Urdu greeting and that “Khuda Hafiz” was consciously done away with by many around the same notorious time period, the 1980s. The only thing the critics are confused about, however, is that they think this term, too, was imported from the Arab world. It wasn’t. I have never heard any Arab use the greeting “Allah Hafiz”. It is a latter-day Pakistani invention and has nearly replaced the original “Khuda Hafiz”, a greeting that we shared with our Persian neighbours.

In fact, even the greeting Assalamu Alaikum (which is Arabic) is used far more regularly in Pakistan than in the Arab world, where (Saudi Arabia included) often the more secular Merhaba is used to greet. In addition, Arabs use a number of other secular greetings such as Subah al khair or Masa al khair (meaning “good morning” and “good evening”) and though Urdu too has Subah bakhair and Shab bakhair, their use is becoming limited compared with Assalamu Alaikum and Allah Hafiz. What is particularly peculiar is that if it makes people feel closer to God to use the word “Allah” (though it is our belief that Allah has 3,000 names of which only 1,000 are revealed), then why not say Allah Nighiban, which is a far older Urdu idiom?

Published in The Express Tribune, July 22nd,  2013.

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Reader Comments (66)

  • Hayat
    Jul 21, 2013 - 10:30PM

    “Is the ninth month of the Hijri calendar pronounced Ramazan or Ramadan? The passion with which discussion on this relatively innocuous matter takes place sometimes amazes me. Does it really make a difference either way?” And then the author goes on to write a whole article about it. Oh, the irony.

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  • Sadist
    Jul 21, 2013 - 10:56PM

    @Hayat:
    The author had to write since ‘liberals’ seems to make it a point.
    Agreed with the writer fully

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  • Rafay R
    Jul 21, 2013 - 11:09PM

    You know you won’t be judged on judgment day regarding pronunciation of ramzan or ramadan. Live and let live folks facepalm

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  • Parvez
    Jul 21, 2013 - 11:11PM

    To an intelligent person willing to use his / her mind there is no difference.
    If a difference has arisen between the years when Kuda Hafiz was used and now when Allah Hafiz is being forced upon us, its the difference in our tolerance level. It’s a matter of prefering form over substance, religiosity over religion……….this can not end well.

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  • Mirza
    Jul 21, 2013 - 11:24PM

    In Urdu we have been calling our God as Khuda, Rab, Oper wala, Malik and so on. Our God by definition can understand what we mean no matter what name or no name we use. Khuda-e-wadaho laasharik knows that we are not talking about idols but our one God. Those insisting on correcting me I tell them first change the word Khuda from the last line of our national anthem which we hear day and night and respect most.

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  • Rasheed
    Jul 21, 2013 - 11:47PM

    I often read your articles and am impressed by the in-depth knowledge of the subjects on which you write. In Pakistan, people of your age.can hardly speak Urdu without mixing English words in every sentence. Idiomatic Urdu is something that is not expected of this generation. And that’s not only with Urdu; Punjabi, Sindhi, Saraiki, etc all have lost their charm. As I often say __ we teach everyn thing in English medium except English!

    Coming back to Urdu, have you ever heard some body saying Adab arz, or Tasleemat or any elder replying Jeetey raho, Khush raho? Or the typical grand-mother,s duaya kalmat _ doodho naho pooton phalo. ,;

    I wonder if you are aware of today’s psyche of the majority of Pakistanis who prefer to wear their Islam on their sleeves and have dogmatic beliefs. If I speak in English, French, German or any other language people get very impressed but if I say ” ghusssa nae kero, shant hojao” then I am a sinner, because I spoke Hindi _ the tongue of the arch enemy__ the use of even one word of Hindi is good enough to declare that I am a non-believer in the Ideology of Pakistan; whatever that is.

    A few days back I read an article that beautifully explained the difference in Islam of say 100 years ago and today_ he said in good old days the Sufis of the sub-continnent used to preach non-Muslims in an effort to bring them in the fold of Islam, today the so-called Ülemas of Pakistan and also of other Muslim states are excluding Muslims from Islam. That speaks loud and clear why Muslims are looked down upon all over the world and are ferociously fighting among themselves. Look at the aftermath of the so-called Arab Spring..

    Rasheed
    . .

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  • Muhammad Rizwan Malik
    Jul 21, 2013 - 11:50PM

    Meray mulk k 2 number liberals aur ‘modern’ log; in ko Amreeka ko America, Jalapeno ko Haelapeno aur Pizza ko Peetza kehnay mein tou koi masla nai hota lekin agar koi Allah ka banda Ramzan ko Ramadan bol de tou in ki jaan ka masla ban jata hai.

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  • ahmad
    Jul 22, 2013 - 12:07AM

    just for the sake of writing… chussssss…

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  • Muhammad Yousuf Khan
    Jul 22, 2013 - 12:28AM

    i wonder how much time these writers have, and specially this lady. No debate whats so over just wasting time whether to say Ramzan or Ramdan? Its thousand times better to practice the month rather then debating on its actual or unreal pronounciation !!!!!

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  • Irum
    Jul 22, 2013 - 1:14AM

    I think the debate is actually an important one and really not as simplistic as the author presumes. It’s about the deep connection between linguistic trends and cultural dynamics. So when people talk about the Khuda Hafiz/Allah Hafiz distinction, they are troubled by the growing, unnecessary religious purism the phrase ‘Allah Hafiz’ denotes. After all, I could talk about Khuda (a general term for God) with a Christian, Hindu, Buddhist or anyone from any religion and we would be talking about essentially the same concept. Allah, however, is a name for the Muslim god (I don’t even want to get into the debate of “but isn’t that the only God?”). So, for me, Allah Hafiz is a divisive term, while Khuda Hafiz is an inclusive one (at least as far as religious people are concerned). After all, if it doesn’t matter, why insist on Allah Hafiz? The fact that people do, signifies that it means something very specific for them. Implicitly, both sides are talking about more than just words in this debate. The author’s analysis is too superficial and lazy to be printed.

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  • kaalchakra
    Jul 22, 2013 - 2:18AM

    Rasheed and Irum

    Please, gentlemen, let’s not make light of a serious subject. When in olden times people said Adab arz and old people replied Jeetey raho, doodho naho pooton phalo, was that really according to Islam, or just substituting the local culture for Islam?! Please study Islam, which has a clear meaning. We are not to be ‘blessed’ by other humans. A Muslim receives blessings from Allah alone. We don’t need any middlemen who can bless us. This was just shirk. I am glad that that practice is not used anymore. Similarly, why did the usage of the word ‘khuda’ disappear almost overnight? Because people realized that it was unIslamic. I am not talking about laymen, but scholars of Islam. The god khuda can be a Hindu god or a Persian god. It did not mean the same as the one true God of Islam. When we have been clearly told la ilaha ila Allah, then why should we settle for confusing terms? We can understand the confusion if there is no clear instruction from Allah, but in this case, there is no room for any doubt.

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  • Nadir
    Jul 22, 2013 - 2:21AM

    Do as the Saudi’s do, as they know best.

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  • RAW is WAR
    Jul 22, 2013 - 5:09AM

    whatever….

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  • Imran
    Jul 22, 2013 - 5:24AM

    real dumb article

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  • jssidhoo
    Jul 22, 2013 - 6:27AM

    @Rasheed:” A few days back I read an article that beautifully explained the difference in Islam of say 100 years ago and today_ he said in good old days the Sufis of the sub-continnent used to preach non-Muslims in an effort to bring them in the fold of Islam, today the so-called Ülemas of Pakistan and also of other Muslim states are excluding Muslims from Islam.” I could not agree with you more , I am a practicing turbaned Sikh and have been at many places in India where there is no gurudwara , now on a special occasion like my son’s birthday or my wedding anniversary when i have wanted to thank God for what he has given me i have done so in a mandir, church, Buddhist temple and at sufi shrines but never at a mosque because i do not think i am allowed inside nor am welcome . Sufism which has been put on the backseat was more inclusive and welcoming modern Islam is more on the lines of George Bush “you are either with us or against us”. My two bits for your consideration .

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  • bharatvarsh
    Jul 22, 2013 - 7:22AM

    Natives are illetrate & uncultured its the arabs who are cultured & literate. Pakistanis should use arabic nomenclature after all they are arabs too. Arabs as we know follow & practice pure, unadultrated, original version 1.0 of islam.

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  • Tribune Reader
    Jul 22, 2013 - 8:23AM

    “Personally, I tend to say “Ramazan” when speaking in Urdu to Pakistanis but “Ramadan” when speaking to anyone else, including not just Arabs, but also Americans, British and those belonging to other nationalities.” So do I. Because my English friends find it difficult to pronounce Ramazan.

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  • Jul 22, 2013 - 8:59AM

    @Hayat: Frankly, I enjoyed this article very much for the simple reason, these everyday salutations and regards that we mention do not get the attention they deserve for tradition.
    The information in the article has several daily usages and makes it interesting in relation to religious and secular contexts. I find it a simple and wholesome article with a lot of clarity. Salams to the author.

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  • afzaal khan
    Jul 22, 2013 - 9:18AM

    JazakALLAh, good article thank you

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  • Noreen
    Jul 22, 2013 - 9:47AM

    Good read.. literally crap debate fashion to discuss such stuff which are not important

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  • Komal S
    Jul 22, 2013 - 10:26AM

    @kaalchakra:
    You sound like a taliban. Just a food for thought, If both of us believe in God then your God and my God are the same independent of our religion. To be intolerant/judgemental to other persons interpretaion of your/our God shows your arrogance and lack of faith in the creator. I am pretty sure your God did not give you the role to validate other persons faith.

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  • Jul 22, 2013 - 10:35AM

    Good point, but when I say, Setumber, no one comes to correct me and make me feel like a lesser Muslim. But when I happen to say Ramazan, people immediately try to rectify me as if I have committed a sin. This is where this Arabisation becomes a pain in the neck!

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  • tkhan
    Jul 22, 2013 - 10:42AM

    I’ve personally been annoyed by this dual use of ramazan and sometimes ramadan. The pronunciation ramazan is what I’ve been hearing since my childhood and seems good to the ear but while we are for instance tweeting we switch to ramadan. I think similarly as we don’t copy Arabs in their greetings such as Subah al khair or Masa al khair (for “good morning” and “good evening”) and use Urdu version Subah bakhair and Shab bakhair we should also stick to ramazan even when tweeting and not ramadan.

    P.S we Muslim need to get these minor things settled and catch the world while we can, if at all.

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  • roadkashehzada
    Jul 22, 2013 - 10:48AM

    wow thats far fetched. a whole article on it. probably shouldnt be more than a blog.
    btw important stuff is happening in the world, white american acquitted over killing black, paletinian-isreali peace negotiations, chinese earthquake, power crisis (may be already over written topic), sartaj aziz in afghanitan etc…..

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  • Mohammad
    Jul 22, 2013 - 11:05AM

    it should be called Ramadan..! the true and proper pronunciation.

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  • Faisal
    Jul 22, 2013 - 11:11AM

    If u talk about pronunciation of Arabic “Ramadan” in Urdu It should be “Ramzan” not “Ramazan”.

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  • RK
    Jul 22, 2013 - 11:37AM

    The point we are missing here is that the spelling of the word Ramadan and Ramazan is identical in Arabic as well in Urdu.:Moreover, the word “Ramadan: is a Quranic word. While reciting the relevant Quranic verse on the month of Ramadan, we pronouce Ramadan and not Ramazan. Similarly while reciting Surah Fateha in our daily prayers, we pronounce “WALADDUALEEN” and not “WaladZualeen Examples of other urdu and Arabic words given in this article are irrelevant in the context of the month of Ramadan..

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  • GhostRider
    Jul 22, 2013 - 11:37AM

    What I ve come to notice is people who say “Ramazan” and “Khuda Hafiz” tend to be more tolerant and liberal and vice versa. Its just my observation I am not passing any verdict so spare me the sermons if you disagree.

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  • Jul 22, 2013 - 12:33PM

    The author took the debate too literally.

    Its not just about the pronunciation and spelling, but the subtle hint of self-hate and loathing.

    Ramzan is an Indian word, Urdu in an Indian language. In 1947, Bengali was considered Indian and hence, Jinnah said Urdu would be the language of Pakistan – the supposed language of the Muslims.

    This ideology of self-hate, which started with hating Indian language of Bengali, has evolved itself to strange proportions and shapes.

    Punjabi is less spoken in Punjab than, say, 20 years ago, in Pakistan and it’ll probably disappear in a generation or 2.

    Similarly, Urdu is being Arabized. Urdu is too close to Hindi, a language spoken by a huge number of Indians and hence, not a good idea. Getting rid of Khuda and Ramzan and what not is part of the process. You already got rid of Hindu and Sikh festival of Basant and the practice of Kite Flying.

    This is not surprising, this is part of the evolution of Pakistan from India and gravitating towards Arabia. All things Indian will be targeted, all Arabic stuff will be loved and promoted.

    Simple strategy, but very effective!

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  • Darjat
    Jul 22, 2013 - 12:36PM

    I did enjoy while reading it

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  • Muhammad
    Jul 22, 2013 - 1:13PM

    The passion with which discussion on this relatively innocuous matter takes place sometimes amazes me. Does it really make a difference either way?

    The discussion is irrelevant and unnecessary, but, then why write a blog about it…I wonder !…I wonder !

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  • Tamatar
    Jul 22, 2013 - 2:29PM

    @author, I don’t mind saying “Ramzan” be it Arabs or Americans. By the way, it’s “Hijra” and not Hijri. ;)

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  • Alam
    Jul 22, 2013 - 2:41PM

    If we recognise Allama Iqbal our national poet pl remember that he most of the used Khuda in his poetry even in Duas.

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  • Haseeb Talal Khan
    Jul 22, 2013 - 2:45PM

    Allah Nigahban will be replaced by Fee Amanillah….Thanks to our infatuation with Arabic words…We Pakistanis tend to think that if we use Arabic phrases to greet one another, it will give immense pleasure to our protector, and we will be considered more pious…which is a mistake…

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  • Pacer
    Jul 22, 2013 - 3:27PM

    8-9 years ago I was uneasy with pronouncing Ramadan, but now with the proliferation of internet and cable TV it has become a very familiar pronunciation. And its not even like we don’t have alphabets to pronounce Ramadan in Urdu, we do. So whats the fuss all about?

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  • gujranwala789
    Jul 22, 2013 - 4:20PM

    @GhostRider:
    And you know I have noticed that people who make “Ramadan” and “Allah Hafiz” or arab influence an “issue” in pakistan happen to be from a specific “sect” that has its loyalty with iran, it is quite clear from the “names” of bloggers who happen to criticize arabic pronunciation of “Ramadan”.

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  • Khair Khaw
    Jul 22, 2013 - 4:53PM

    While working in the United States, I was flabbergasted as my Jewish boss on the first day of the Moslem fasting month asked “are you fasting in Ramadan.” WOW! That was the correct pronunciation which I had never heard in Pakistan (I am talking of times before 1982). Well, we can’t make a big issue out of this trivia. Also, it is futile to make a fuss of whether we say “Khuda Hafiz” or “Allah Hafiz.” Let the speaker choose and let the listener understand without bothering to correct it. To each, his own.

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  • Omer
    Jul 22, 2013 - 5:09PM

    @ahmad: Everybody knows the one thumbs up you got was yourself.

    I think the article was interesting and was well written.
    A word of advice for you, if you do not like something move on instead of writing pointless comments.

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  • Rizwan Nasar
    Jul 22, 2013 - 5:39PM

    @kaalchakra:

    WhatWhat nonsense! As a Muslim the concept of any other God should not exist. God is “Rubbul-Alameen”. Have you ever heard the terminology “Rubul Muslameen”. There is no such thing as “Hindu God” or “Persian God”. Get your mind off the myopic thinking. Khuda, Rub, Allah, is one – The LORD of the universe. Don’t sit there and divide HIM like you have divided yourselves in Madhabs, Sects, Languages, Provinces and all little things.

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  • zafar
    Jul 22, 2013 - 5:42PM

    @author You’ve really put the things in perspective.

    Sometime we generate useless discussions. Nature of our language can give rise to any number of discussions, just basing on the perspective your’re viewing from. It is highly westernized (a lot of English words) for Mullahs, and highly Arabic or highly Persian or highly Sanskrit. You can easily raise any kind of controversy.

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  • TrueBlue43
    Jul 22, 2013 - 5:45PM

    I live in KSA and am witnessing this unnecessary transformation regarding culture & language (and to some extent religious as well) ….. to me, it doesn’t matter which one you chose out of Khuda Hafiz or Allah Hafiz ….. however, i would prefer Khuda Hafiz if i am forced to use Allah Hafiz by a certain mindset …… see, the argument is not chosing amongst the appropriate word but it is the import of cultural as well as religious aggression in general from here …… it is a sad thing to watch …..

    The people who care so much about ET’s space & writer’s sheer wastage of time & energy, get a life ….. Thank God, none of you seem to be a librarian ….. otherwise, you would’ve burnt 99% of it being irrelevant to you champions …… cheers

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  • Indian
    Jul 22, 2013 - 6:22PM

    This is how muslims are spending (wasting) their time…
    Do you think any body cares in India whether you say Diwali or Divali or Deepavali ? Different people say it differently; all are OK. It’s the thought that counts, not the form…

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  • Muhammad
    Jul 22, 2013 - 6:46PM

    Ramzan or Ramadan…thats a literary issue and not of much significance when two or more different languages and dialects are under discussion. But however, you pronounce it, Allah doesn’t care, he cares a lot other than how you pronounce.

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  • A Pakistani
    Jul 22, 2013 - 6:46PM

    Allah S.W.T. is called “Allah” because it has no plural, no masculine, no feminine and that is why Allah is one & only one.
    On the other hand, the word God has plural (gods) and feminine (goddess) etc.
    Therefore, the proper name is Allah and the words should be
    MashaAllah,
    InshaAllah,
    Ya Allah khair,
    Allah Hafiz and Allah o Akbar.
    Our modernity should never alter the real name.

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  • Well Wisher
    Jul 22, 2013 - 6:50PM

    @Rizwan Nasar:
    Your message pleads for inclusiveness and TOLERANCE but your style of presentation is INTOLERANT!

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  • Quantum
    Jul 22, 2013 - 6:52PM

    @gujranwala789:

    You are a Sunni extremist sympathizer. I have seen many of your comments, that’s the conclusion I reached.

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  • Irum
    Jul 22, 2013 - 6:59PM

    @Tamatar: It’s Hijra in Arabic and Hijri in Urdu. There’s no right and wrong here. Those are two separate languages, you know. When speaking Urdu, saying Hijra would sound preposterous. If you speak Arabic, you are welcome to say Hijra. I don’t understand this wannabe Arabism. Why would anyone want to emulate a culture that is so often so regressive?

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  • Irum
    Jul 22, 2013 - 7:02PM

    @kaalchakra: Wow, way to miss the point of both the article and my comment. Flew right over your head didn’t they? Or are you just an Indian trolling here since you don’t even seem to know that Irum is not a ‘gentleman’s’ name.

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  • Irum
    Jul 22, 2013 - 7:05PM

    @gujranwala789:
    I am not Shia yet I don’t want to get on the Allah Hafiz train. There goes your baseless conspiracy theory.

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  • Salman Ahmed
    Jul 22, 2013 - 7:14PM

    @Rizwan Nasar:

    Agree … oh btw,,,love the use of the word “Madhab” :-)

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  • A J Khan
    Jul 22, 2013 - 7:39PM

    ramzaan, innit?

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  • Pathan
    Jul 22, 2013 - 9:18PM

    I for one prefer the Shia pronunciation, which sounds a bit like “don’tbeatmeup.”

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  • expaki
    Jul 22, 2013 - 10:03PM

    @Ayesha, when that guy broke continent, not we lost value, but also our identity too. you are living in UK, you can criticize anyone you wish, in Pakistan dare contradict with an ILLITERATE
    Mullah, and very next hour, you will be charged with Jamati “MUJZAA” known as Blasphemy.
    I am a Punjabi, will always remain Punjabi, I respect Sindhi, Baluchis and ofcourse anyone living in Pakistan. I learnt to say it Ramazan, Khuda Hafiz. while all other forms taken from Arabs are Chinese to me/- and KHUDA save me from Arabic culture

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  • Zia
    Jul 22, 2013 - 10:55PM

    0k its Ramazan n0t Ramadan i m agreed n0w happy. St0ry the endRecommend

  • Umair
    Jul 22, 2013 - 11:05PM

    What a waste of a column. Slow news day? This piece is more appropriate for teenager magazines.

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  • VS
    Jul 22, 2013 - 11:21PM

    “The god khuda can be a Hindu god or a Persian god.” So what difference does a name make if your belief in Allah is pure, firm and unshakable

    ‘Ramadan’ was originally changed to Ramzan, as in Hindustani ‘Ramadan’ is a construct of two words – Ram (Lord Rama of Hindus) and Daan as a donation/gift.

    Now the push is for Arabization, and moving away from our Persian heritage. In schools Persian used to be (is it still so?) the classical second language for Urdu. Much like Sanskrit was for Hindi, and Latin or English.

    People of the subcontinent have a very rich multicultural tradition. We had people from all over the world come to our beautiful land – e.g. Afghans, Central Asians, Turks, Arabs and Persians. We are happy as we are – no need to chase mirages?

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  • Jay
    Jul 23, 2013 - 12:40AM

    its better to say ‘ Allah Hafiz ‘ , Allah is the best word to call God , calling God ” Allah ” also states that there is only one God which is Allah while the word ” Khuda ” can be used for multiple Gods

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  • A. Khan
    Jul 23, 2013 - 8:14AM

    Again we seem to be concerned about trivial matters. The pronunciation does not matter but rather the observance of Ramadhan (or Ramazan) matters.

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  • antanu
    Jul 23, 2013 - 10:07AM

    it is funny hoe paki intelligentsia are trying to create rift in their misguided ZEAL.RAMADAN or RAMZAN….is it such a big issue? Your country is facing far more pressing problems a d need honest debates than brooding over how to spell certain words or involve in cultural rehabilitating which is the essence of your article.Recommend

  • Aschraful Makhlooq
    Jul 23, 2013 - 11:30AM

    By reciting Ramazan or Ramadan meanings don’t change but in Arabic language real word is “Ramadan” because if you listen Quran’s recitation Arabs pronounce word Zuad as Duad…..

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  • choclet
    Jul 23, 2013 - 11:32AM

    paakistan or ‘napaak’istan? ‘islam’abad or ‘isloo’???

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  • Jaleel
    Jul 23, 2013 - 3:28PM

    This topic was already perfectly captured by Sibtain Naqvi on ET Blogs. This Topic has already been covered and quite eloquently i might add. the link is below

    http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/18102/when-ramazan-became-ramadan-our-infatuation-with-arab-culture/

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  • Nicholas Sebastian Horticulturist
    Jul 23, 2013 - 3:41PM

    I remember reading a very similar article on ET Blogs on the eve of Ramzan, both had strikingly very similar topics, unfortunately i still cannot understand which side is Ayesha defending or leaning towards. Atleast the blog piece had a clear directive.

    I for one whole heartledy agree with whichever option has pure cultural roots, and obviously Arab Culture is NOT Pakistani culture. Its rather sad seeing Pakistanis obsessing over Arab culture.

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  • Manoo B.Island
    Jul 23, 2013 - 5:20PM

    Sibtain Naqvi had already captured this issue at the ET Blogs, i believe it was a pretty absolute article considering the viral sensation that erupted post its release. I know this because i had discussed the Ramzan Ramadan issue with several circles of friends and all of us referenced the original ET blog post.

    I dont understand Ayesha’s take on the same issue, its been done before, in a better writing style and the writers stance on the issue was clearly understood. However this piece is pretty ambiguous and feels as if shes playing for both teams. I highly recommend everyone checks out the following piece which is a link to the original Ramzan Ramadan article: http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/18102/when-ramazan-became-ramadan-our-infatuation-with-arab-culture/Recommend

  • Manoo B.Island
    Jul 23, 2013 - 5:21PM

    Sibtain Naqvi had already captured this issue at the ET Blogs, i believe it was a pretty absolute article considering the viral sensation that erupted post its release. I know this because i had discussed the Ramzan Ramadan issue with several circles of friends and all of us referenced the original ET blog post.

    I dont understand Ayesha’s take on the same issue, its been done before, in a better writing style and the writers stance on the issue was clearly understood. However this piece is pretty ambiguous and feels as if shes playing for both teams. I highly recommend everyone checks out the following piece which is a link to the original Ramzan Ramadan article: http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/18102/when-ramazan-became-ramadan-our-infatuation-with-arab-culture/Recommend

  • Altaf Hussain
    Jul 23, 2013 - 8:25PM

    @indian so that’s how indians do waste their time by spewing non-sense on the pakistani sites?! color me suprise.

    Recommend

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